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"Crony Capitalism is an outsourcing of American jobs plus walmartization of the whole country" - I.G.
Many people around the world think that USA is a capitalist society with a free market. Nothing can be more far from the truth. We Americans live in a crony capitalist society.

Crony Capitalism.  Just what is it and why is it so bad? Crony Capitalists are those who seek to win in the market place, not by honest competition, but rather through government favoritism in the forms of advantageous laws, tax regulations, and other such methods. This is the heart of corruption and special interest groups as we know them today. Some among them may not realize it yet, but average people, both Conservative and Liberal are equally against crony capitalism, but they just blame each other for its existence.

Liberals blame conservatives because the free market creates rich people and they can buy politicians off. So liberals propose more regulations to try and limit said rich people’s power. Conservatives blame Liberals for creating Big Government, which won’t allow businesses to survive and grow without strong political connections.

So what can be done in order to fix the system? How can we make politicians accountable to the people, not the special interest groups? How can we make the government work for us, not us work for the Government?

I am sure there are no easy answers, but let’s try to put something on the table and start the brainstorming: CLICK HERE

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Wed Dec 18, 2013 at 04:52 AM PST

Shame on us!!!

by Elik Yuzhnij

Money and corruption are ruining the land, crooked politicians betray the working man, pocketing the profits and treating us like sheep, and we're tired of hearing promises that we know they'll never keep.
                                                                                     Ray Davies
Crony capitalism is an outsourcing of American jobs plus walmartization of the whole country.
                                                                                      I.G.

Staten Island, NY

Has anybody noticed the name of the company renovating the Staten Island Expressway? It is CCA otherwise know as China Construction of America. I’s ownership trail leads right back to the Chinese government and they have civil works contracts around the country (including federal buildings?). Shame on us!!!

In 2001, the company had to move its headquarters from the World Trade Center to Jersey City after the Sept 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.
But 2001 was also a turning point for the American subsidiary's business in the US. It won its first public works contract in the nation to build the Santee High School and Technology Center in South Carolina, after shifting its focus and becoming a general contractor. Since then, it has completed about 100 projects all over the US and is currently undertaking about 10 projects in New York, South Carolina, Washington DC and the Bahamas.
After all this time, China Construction America has gradually established its reputation and is no longer a newcomer to the US construction market.
In New York State alone, it won bids for projects including the renovation of the Alexander Hamilton Bridge (between Manhattan and the Bronx), construction of the ventilation shafts for the No 7 Subway line extension in New York (a $57 million deal), and the Yankee Stadium Station. The list just goes on.
Source: CLICK HERE

                                              ###

Brooklyn, NY

Forest City Ratner to sell 70% stake in Atlantic Yards to Chinese government-owned developer; largest such deal with Chinese backing.

First, a Russian billionaire whose path to wealth was launched during the shady days of post-Soviet privatization bought 80% of the Nets and 45% of the Barclays Center operating company.
 Now, after Forest City Ratner got one tower started, a government-owned property developer from China, Greenland Holdings Group, is buying 70% of the remaining 15 towers in the Atlantic Yards project, the largest commercial real estate deal ever for a Chinese company in the United States.
 And the latter seems a solid deal for developer Forest City Ratner, since it will continue to gain development fees and manage the project, hedging its risks. It likely can accelerate construction, thus responding to widespread criticism for the slow delivery of promised affordable housing.
 In both cases, the bottom line is: after Forest City did the heavy lifting to get subsidies, tax breaks, and regulatory approval, gaining what they call in the real estate development business "entitlement," Atlantic Yards became a pure investment opportunity, and global capital knows no boundaries, neither ethical nor geographic.
 And that means public assistance from New Yorkers is helping the Chinese government earn profits.
Source: CLICK HERE
Discuss
Listen to all the news channels and radio talk shows. They talk about Obamacare, gun control, gay marriage, woman’s issues, race issues, foreign policy, abortion, but never seem to say much about manufacturing.  It is up to us to make sure this becomes part of the national agenda.

Reviving American manufacturing in order to generate good-paying jobs garners support across the political spectrum, from tea party Conservatives and from pro-labor Progressives. Because the Make it in the USA movement is one that transcends ideology there no reason we can’t, together, with time and effort, accomplish the goal of resuscitating the American middle class so that it is again the envy of the world.

“Manufacturing is more than just putting parts together. It’s coming up with ideas, testing principles and perfecting the engineering, as well as final assembly” – James Dyson
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An immigrant to this country from the former Soviet Union, I am an electrical engineer by profession, a Russian newspaper editor and, with my wife, the owner a business that manufactures women’s fashions.

Before 2009 I wasn't political. But in 2009, the words "labor movement” drove me to activism, and not in a constructive way. Americans who never experienced the Soviet system surely can't understand the negative connotations there. I was invited to do a political magazine on Staten Island; a conservative borough of New York City. Living a place filled with conservatives, including many other immigrants from the former USSR who are attracted to the Republican Party because of its strong stand against the Soviets in the 1980s, my American political journey began as a tea party Republican...

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Make It In The USA": This is what we are fighting for

By Ilya Galak

My personal understanding of how the US economy works:

Crony Capitalism is an outsourcing of American Jobs plus Walmartization of the whole country" - I.G.
Without manufacturing the Middle Class is doomed
“The American consumer is also the American worker, and if we don’t do something to protect our manufacturing base here at home, it is going to be hard to buy any retail goods” – Lindsey Graham
“Capitalism works better from every perspective when the economic decision makers are forced to share power with those who will be affected by those decisions” – Barney Frank
“Manufacturing is more than just putting parts together. It’s coming up with ideas, testing principles and perfecting the engineering, as well as final assembly” – James Dyson
How to Hit the Nail on the Thumb?

Attention All Union Leaders! All of them, including municipal unions.

If you only have 2.28 minutes to watch that video ... NOW:

 CLICK HERE      

The untraditional business-labor relationship, spearheaded by organizer Paul Puente of Houston’s IBEW Local 716, has enhanced the quality and credibility of Neutex. The end result will be a 150,000 SQ.F. factory and  employment of 300 workers.

An assembly plant in Houston, Texas will soon be buzzing with IBEW workers. Neutex Advanced Energy Corporation, in partnership with Houston Local 716, is relocating its core manufacturing from China to the U.S. Organizer Paul Puente helped seal the deal by paying careful attention to the employers' wants and needs. The IBEW will provide trained workers and help the company market its advanced energy products. In exchange all current and newly hired workers will become members of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers

Discuss

Fri Dec 13, 2013 at 04:59 AM PST

Death in the Boxing Ring

by Elik Yuzhnij

Interview with Sergei Artemiev

By Ilya Galak

Brooklyn, NY

Boxing is big money.  Boxing is fame.  Boxing is a spectacle. That is why it attracts such overwhelming attention, while touching the interests of so many – bread and circuses.  Perhaps, that is why not everything that happens in professional boxing finds adequate evaluation.

In fact, the events in the boxing ring should be evaluated much easier; as professional boxing – is life.  Just like in life, it offers place for tragedy, as well as comedy.  A boxer confined to a wheelchair is always a tragedy.  A boxer opening his gown with no boxers underneath (as it happened with Timmy Larkin in 1942) is a comedy.  A Boxing Hall of Fame champion drowned in his own bathtub, like Albert Chalky Wright – is a tragicomedy.

Just like in life, there is always a place for heroism, in boxing. A prospective boxer Craig Bodsianowsky got into a car accident, and had his leg amputated  at the knee.  His will power was extraordinary enough to help him come back to the ring, and keep fighting on a prosthetic leg, demonstrating his high class mastership.

There is also place for cowardice, as when a two-meter-tall Anjey Golota missed Mike Tyson’s punch and started running away from the ring in the middle of the fight.

Still, the same question has been bothering me for a while: why is that despite medical control and plenty of referees, the tragedies on the ring keep happening? Of course, it is often a referee’s fault by letting the winning boxer finish the ‘floating’ rival.  Often it is the managers’ fault , pushing their boxer to fight an incommensurably stronger one, or while unprepared physically or technically.

A boxer has a right to refuse continuing the fight, but in theory only.  People blaming boxers who become handicapped because they didn’t quit fighting in time, simply don’t understand the ring fighter’s psychology. Perhaps, here lies the answer to my question:  the blame is on boxers’ character, will power, and courage.

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About the author: CLICK HERE

Every time an American job is outsourced to China or other slave-wage counties the American economy loses the spending and tax revenues that job generates. Every time an American worker is forced to take a low-paying service job, that worker’s disposable income shrinks, making it harder for that worker to stay in the middle class and decreasing demand across the economy.

Simply put, we need more American manufacturing. We need to stop sending jobs and the dollars they generate overseas. We need to start exporting high-quality goods produced in the United States to markets around the world again and bring our trade deficits back into balance. And while there are many people in Washington for whom rebuilding the middle class and the country’s manufacturing base are priorities, the issues is continually drowned out by politics and manufactured crisis.  That’s why we are proposing a grassroots, bottom up approach through the establishment of Make It in the USA chapters nationwide.

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About the Authors: CLICK HERE

When it opened in 1964, the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge was the longest suspension bridge on Earth; an iconic structure in a city with more than its fair share of icons.  50 years later the MTA (Metropolitan Transit Authority), which operates the bridge, is planning a massive $235 million-dollar upgrade, replacing its concrete upper deck with steel.

Unfortunately, the MTA decided to use Chinese and not American steel. Outsourcing this project would be a slap in the face at any time, not only to American workers and US manufacturers, but also to those who pay the exorbitant $15 dollars toll for the privilege of driving on the bridge. But it is even more egregious at a time when this country is suffering though a period of high unemployment with economic output well under capacity due to the lingering effects of the 2008 financial crisis.

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Sat Dec 07, 2013 at 06:33 AM PST

Make It In The USA

by Elik Yuzhnij

An immigrant to this country from the former Soviet Union, I am an electrical engineer by profession, a Russian newspaper editor and, with my wife, the owner a business that manufactures women’s fashions.

Before 2009 I wasn't political. But in 2009, the words "labor movement” drove me to activism, and not in a constructive way. Americans who never experienced the Soviet system surely can't understand the negative connotations there. I was invited to do a political magazine on Staten Island; a conservative borough of New York City. Living a place filled with conservatives, including many other immigrants from the former USSR who are attracted to the Republican Party because of its strong stand against the Soviets in the 1980s, my American political journey began as a tea party Republican.

Eventually, after observing, reading, listening to people (like my progressive friend Michael Califra), my views changed. I realized our biggest problem is the relentless war on the middle class and the outsourcing of good manufacturing jobs. There are many important issues to debate. But without manufacturing our middle class is doomed. Restoring manufacturing became my passion

I and others organized the “Middle Class Action Project – Make It in the USA” movement and I want to share our goals with the Kos community.

That is why I am here.

Poll

How to bring manufacturing jobs back to the USA?

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| 34 votes | Vote | Results

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