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Reposted from Hellraisers Journal by JayRaye
You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Saturday May 29, 1915
From the Appeal to Reason: P. H. Skinner Covers the Grilling of John D Rockefeller Jr.

Over the nest few days Hellraisers will presents the Appeal's coverage of the grilling of John D. Rockefeller Jr. by Chairman Frank P. Walsh of the Commission on Industrial Relations. We begin with the report of Appeal Correspondent, P. H. Skinner:

Appeal Staff Correspondent Describes
Walsh-Rockefeller Combat


BY P. H. SKINNER.
Staff Correspondent Appeal to Reason.
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Frank P. Walsh from Harpers Weekly  of Sept 27, 1913,
Frank P Walsh
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Washington, D. C.-Here in sordid, capital-ridden Washington, a miracle is being performed. An investigation involving capital and labor is being held with utter and exact impartiality between the two forces. With my own eyes I have seen John D. Rockefeller, one of the richest men in the whole world, and, perhaps, the most powerful, on terms of exact equality with "Tony the Tramp"-the "roughneck sky-pilot" as one silk clad lady, with Rockefeller predilections, called him-Daniel E. McCorckle, a preacher from Sunrise, Wyo. And I saw a poor, worn-out slave of the Colorado Fuel and Iron Co., another "sky-pilot," gazing defiantly into the eyes of the uncrowned czar, and reciting the most blood-curdling atrocities committed by the Cossacks of the great one.

And later I saw this same czar on the witness stand, doubling and twisting on his crooked trail like a scared rabbit-throwing out his clouds of sophistry-ink like a cuttle-fish, and determined, relentless, persistent, resourceful Frank P. Walsh, chairman of the industrial relations commission, towering above him, shaking a bony finger at the white, expressionless face and demanding in a bull-like roar, "What are you going to do-never mind your pleasant generalities-what are you going to do about these atrocious conditions in your state-your state-of Colorado?" And pinning him down, by force of personality, holding the bony form in his mental grasp as a youngster holds a squirming eel, until John D. Rockefeller, Jr., had made confessions enough to damn him forever before any impartial court in the world.

[Continued below the fold.]

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Reposted from Shutterbugs by Ojibwa

During the 1960s, General Motors cars—Chevrolet, Pontiac, Oldsmobile, Buick, and Cadillac—continued to dominate the American market. Shown below are photographs of the General Motors cars on display at LeMay—America’s Car Museum in Tacoma, Washington.

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"The willingness with which our young people are likely to serve in any war, no matter how justified, will be directly proportional to how they perceive the veterans of earlier wars were treated and appreciated by their nation."

- George Washington

History of the 1932 Bonus Expeditionary Force (BEF)
In 1924, WWI vets were voted “Adjusted Compensation” by Congress: $1.25 for each day served overseas, $1.00 for each day served in the States. To the “doughboys,” it was seen as a bonus.

Veterans owed $50 or less were paid immediately. Everyone else was given a certificate that would collect 4 percent interest with an additional 25 percent tacked on upon payment. However, there was a catch: the certificate was not redeemable until 1945. . . and a little something called “The Depression” was looming over the horizon.

In the spring and summer of 1932, disgruntled, broke, and unemployed veterans like Angelo got the idea to demand payment on the future worth of the aforementioned certificates. Anywhere from 17,000 to 25,000 former doughboys formed a Bonus Expeditionary Force (BEF), otherwise known as the “Bonus Army,” and—bonus certificates in hand—they marched on Washington to picket Congress and President Herbert Hoover.

It started in Portland, Or - Walter W. Waters Leader of the Bonus Army
Walters noted that special interest lobbyists got results in Washington, and conceived of a lobby of veterans to encourage the United States Government to deliver the payment the veterans were due.

On 11 March 1932 Waters called for a march on Washington and 250-300 men from Portland joined him.  They marched behind a banner reading “Portland Bonus March – On to Washington.” The veterans and their families had popular support and the support of some authorities.  A Portland railroad offered the use of dung-stained cattle cars to transport the Bonus Army.  The Indiana National Guard and the Pennsylvania National Guard used military vehicles to transport the Bonus Army.  Toll bridge operators let the Bonus Army march silently across bridges without pay, and police officers refused to arrest Bonus Army veterans for trespassing.  Thousands joined the Bonus Army as it marched towards Washington with Sergent Waters as their elected leader.  Waters forbade drinking, panhandling, and ‘anti-government’ or ‘radical’ talk.

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Thu May 28, 2015 at 12:00 PM PDT

The Birth of The Armored Tank

by Lenny Flank

By 1917, World War One was a stalemate. Both the Entente and the German armies were bloodied and exhausted. The development of the machine gun and the shrapnel artillery shell had given the defensive side an enormous advantage in warfare. Both sides were locked inside extensive trench networks from which they would send waves of men to storm across No-Man’s-Land to try to take the enemy’s trenches—only to be mowed down by machine guns and artillery. For years, hundreds of thousands of men were cut down in futile attacks that gained only scant yards, which were often then lost in a counter-attack. In desperation, both sides tried every conceivable method to break through the trenches and reach open ground where they could maneuver, and new weapons were introduced at a furious pace—airplanes, hand grenades, trench mortars, poison gas, submachine guns, flamethrowers, aerial bombs. None of them worked. It seemed as if the war would never end.

Then came the tank . . . .

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Reposted from Hellraisers Journal by JayRaye

My friends, it is solidarity of labor we want.
We do not want to find fault with each other,
but to solidify our forces and say to each other:
"We must be together; our masters are joined together
and we must do the same thing."
-Mother Jones

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Sunday May 28, 1905
From the Appeal to Reason: F. D. Warren Compares Roosevelt to Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
In this week's edition of the Appeal, Fred Warren compares the treatment dished out upon the Teamsters of Chicago by President Roosevelt to the respectful consideration given to the workingmen of New York when they were granted a meeting with President Lincoln on March the 21st of 1864.

The words of President Lincoln still ring true today:

The strongest bond of human sympathy, outside the family relation, should be one uniting all working people of all nations and kindreds.
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Reposted from Hellraisers Journal by JayRaye

My friends, it is solidarity of labor we want.
We do not want to find fault with each other,
but to solidify our forces and say to each other:
"We must be together; our masters are joined together
and we must do the same thing."
-Mother Jones

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Saturday May 27, 1905
Chicago, Illinois - Teamsters Strike Claims Lives on Both Sides

Blockade at State and Madison Streets, Chicago Teamsters Strike, Harpers Weekly Review, June 17, 1905
Chicago Teamsters Strike
Blockade at State and Madison Streets
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While Hellraisers supports the Teamsters in their strike, which was begun as a show of solidarity for Chicago's striking Garment Workers, we deplore the violence now bringing chaos to the city. Nowhere have we been able to find a call for peaceful picketing   from the leaders of the Teamsters or from the Chicago Federation of Labor. If such calls are pointed out to us, we will issue an apology.

From the Illinois Rock Island Argus of May 15, 1905:

Negro is Shot Dead.

James Jennings, 26 years old, colored, was shot dead and P. Lagrogoris, owner of a lunch wagon in front of 2517 State street, was severely beaten early yesterday. Legrogoris was taken to Mercy hospital, where it is said his condition is serious.

From the Rock Island Argus of May 17, 1905:
Boy Shot and Killed

Chicago, May 17.-The first schoolboy has fallen a victim to the violence attending the teamsters strike.

Enoch Carlson, 11 years old, a pupil in the Ward school, was shot and killed by a negro strike breaker, who was passing the child's home, 2701 Princeton avenue. The shooting occurred at 6:15 p. m. after a score of playing children had shouted derisively at the negro and a companion...

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Reposted from Hellraisers Journal by JayRaye
You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Wednesday May 26, 1915
Trinidad, Colorado - Robert Uhlich Acquitted of Murder in Death of Mack Powell

Colorado Mine Owner Instructs Judge re; grand jury investigation. Photo only. By K R Chamberlain. The Masses. November 1914.
COLORADO JUSTICE
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Although we welcome the news that Brother Uhlich has been acquitted of murder in the death of Brother Mack Powell, we would point out that no acquittal can ever restore to Uhlich the many long months that he has spent in that filthy jail in Trinidad. The news accounts below state that Mack Powell was a cowboy. We will remind our readers that Brother Powell was a union miner who was working as a cowboy and was shot off his horse by mine guards when these guards attacked the Ludlow Tent Colony in October of 1913.

From the El Paso Herald of May 22, 1915:

UHLICH WOULD PROVE ALIBE AS DEFENCE AGAINST CHARGE

Trinidad,Colo., May 22.-Denial that he was at Ludlow on Oct.9, the day that Mack Powell was shot and killed, and that he took any part in the battle between strikers and deputies, was made on the witness stand this morning by Robert Uhlich, on trial for his life. The testimony of the defendant, which was short, balanced the testimony to establish a complete alibi offered by a number of witnesses Friday.

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From the El Paso Herald of May 24, 1915:
UHLICH MURDER CASE GOES TO THE JURY

Trinidad, Colo., May 24.-Two and a half hours of argument this morning to be followed by four hours of argument this afternoon was to conclude the trial of Robert Uhlich, former president of the Trinidad Miners' union, on trial for his life for the murder of Mack Powell, a noncombatant, during a battle between strikers and deputies on Oct. 9, 1913.

The case will go to the jury late this afternoon.

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From the El Paso Herald of May 25, 1915:
UHLICH IS ACQUITTED OF CHARGE OF MURDER

Trinidad, Colo., May 25.-On the jury's first ballot, Robert Uhlich, a union leader, was acquitted Monday night of a charge of murder of Mack Powell, a cowboy, Oct. 9, 1913. Powell was killed in a fight between mine guards and strikers near Ludlow during the coal strike.

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No, it's not a Hollywood scifi movie about a caped superhero . . .  In World War Two, the US military had actual plans in the works to use bats--Mexican Free-tailed Bats, to be specific--as living incendiary bombs to win the war by setting fire to entire Japanese cities. It was called "Project X-Ray". And here is its strange story.

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Reposted from Antiquities Act Defenders and Supporters by Ojibwa

This diary will be the first diary published in the new Group Antiquities Act Defenders and Supporters. The Goal of the group is to debate the Act, its importance to the country and conservation, its current use and future, and to ensure the Act stays on the books permanently. Only by gaining control of Congress, and keeping the White House in Democratic hands can we be assured that the Act will remain in force. There is no guarantee the Act would survive a radical Republican trifecta, not with how radically anti-environment the Republicans have become since Gingrich.. Thus, once Democrats own all 3, it is imperative that action be taken to safeguard the Act permanently from those legislators who would try to overturn it. the purpose of this group, ultimately, is  to make the Antiquities Act permanent and return its reach to all 50 states.

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Reposted from Hellraisers Journal by JayRaye

The capitalist class is always on strike against the working class.
-Mary R Alspaugh

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Tuesday May 25, 1915
From the International Socialist Review: Mary R. Alspaugh on the Colorado Miners

Refugees from Ludlow in Trinidad from International Socialist Review of June 1914, search link with
Readers of Hellraisers will recall the description by Mrs. Alspaugh, featured in the April edition of the Review, which told of the hardships endured by the former strikers in Colorado since the end of the strike. In this month's International Socialist Review, an article by Mary Alspaugh again offers a look into the strike and it's aftermath from the point of view of a class-conscious miner's wife.

Mrs. Alspaugh offers some thoughts about the over-powering forces summoned by the capitalist class to crush the miners and their families as they struggle for a decent standard of living. And she deplores the lack of class-consciousness that prevails in mining camps:

During the strike here the miners' wives and daughters organized a woman's auxiliary. A discussion came up in one of the meetings as to whether or not we should patronize a certain merchant who was accused of being "unfair." In fact, there was strong evidence that he was unfair, but one member objected to any discrimination on the ground that she did not believe in "tearing down what it had taken a lifetime to build up." A very remarkable statement, it seemed to me, to come from a "strong union woman," especially in the face of the fact that this very class of people had robbed us of all we had slaved for all our dull, drab lives, and that the very merchant in question was at that moment undermining the Socialist movement—the hope of the laboring class.
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Within the overall Christian community, there continues to be waged the debate over who is really a Christian and who is not. For many, this is a debate about belief: belief in the Bible rather than belief in any scientific finding which might contradict the Bible. There is a feeling that science and Christian religion are irreconcilable, particularly with regard to the creation of the universe, the age of the planet, and the origins of humans. These are not recent arguments, but ones which have been taking place for the last couple of centuries. One of the more interesting debates centered around the shape of the earth, with some arguing that it was impossible to be a Christian and believe that the earth is a globe.

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Reposted from Daily Kos by Denise Oliver Velez
United States Army Private First Class William K. Nakamura, Medal of Honor recipient
United States Army Private First Class William K. Nakamura, U.S. Medal of Honor recipient, awarded posthumously.
In "The Memorial Day history forgot: The Martyrs of the Race Course," I wrote last year about the not very well known African-American roots of Memorial Day. In recent years, some media attention has been paid to the long history of Black military service—from the Revolutionary War, including Haitians who fought for us, through the civil war, in films like Glory, and the Tuskegee Airmen in World War II—no matter the racism we faced, and still face in this country.  

We hear less about other soldiers of color—Asian, Native American and Latino who died for us, who also faced, and still face discrimination within our shores.

Pictured above is William Kenzo Nakamura (January 21, 1922-July 4, 1944).

He was a United States Army soldier and a recipient of the United States military's highest decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions in World War II.

Nakamura was born in Seattle to Japanese immigrant parents. He is a Nisei, which means that he is a second generation Japanese-American. His family was interned in Minidoka in Idaho during World War II. Nakamura volunteered to be part of the all-Nisei 442nd Regimental Combat Team. This army unit was mostly made up of Japanese Americans from Hawaii and the mainland.

On July 4, 1944, Nakamura was serving as a private first class in the 442nd Regimental Combat Team. On that day, near Castellina, Italy, he single-handedly destroyed an enemy machine gun emplacement and later volunteered to cover his unit's withdrawal. He was then killed while attacking another machine gun nest which was firing on his platoon

Follow me below the fold for more of this memorial history.
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