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Reposted from Hellraisers Journal by JayRaye

My friends, it is solidarity of labor we want.
We do not want to find fault with each other,
but to solidify our forces and say to each other:
"We must be together; our masters are joined together
and we must do the same thing."
-Mother Jones

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Sunday May 28, 1905
From the Appeal to Reason: F. D. Warren Compares Roosevelt to Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
In this week's edition of the Appeal, Fred Warren compares the treatment dished out upon the Teamsters of Chicago by President Roosevelt to the respectful consideration given to the workingmen of New York when they were granted a meeting with President Lincoln on March the 21st of 1864.

The words of President Lincoln still ring true today:

The strongest bond of human sympathy, outside the family relation, should be one uniting all working people of all nations and kindreds.
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Reposted from Hellraisers Journal by JayRaye

My friends, it is solidarity of labor we want.
We do not want to find fault with each other,
but to solidify our forces and say to each other:
"We must be together; our masters are joined together
and we must do the same thing."
-Mother Jones

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Saturday May 27, 1905
Chicago, Illinois - Teamsters Strike Claims Lives on Both Sides

Blockade at State and Madison Streets, Chicago Teamsters Strike, Harpers Weekly Review, June 17, 1905
Chicago Teamsters Strike
Blockade at State and Madison Streets
``````````
While Hellraisers supports the Teamsters in their strike, which was begun as a show of solidarity for Chicago's striking Garment Workers, we deplore the violence now bringing chaos to the city. Nowhere have we been able to find a call for peaceful picketing   from the leaders of the Teamsters or from the Chicago Federation of Labor. If such calls are pointed out to us, we will issue an apology.

From the Illinois Rock Island Argus of May 15, 1905:

Negro is Shot Dead.

James Jennings, 26 years old, colored, was shot dead and P. Lagrogoris, owner of a lunch wagon in front of 2517 State street, was severely beaten early yesterday. Legrogoris was taken to Mercy hospital, where it is said his condition is serious.

From the Rock Island Argus of May 17, 1905:
Boy Shot and Killed

Chicago, May 17.-The first schoolboy has fallen a victim to the violence attending the teamsters strike.

Enoch Carlson, 11 years old, a pupil in the Ward school, was shot and killed by a negro strike breaker, who was passing the child's home, 2701 Princeton avenue. The shooting occurred at 6:15 p. m. after a score of playing children had shouted derisively at the negro and a companion...

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Reposted from Hellraisers Journal by JayRaye
You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Wednesday May 26, 1915
Trinidad, Colorado - Robert Uhlich Acquitted of Murder in Death of Mack Powell

Colorado Mine Owner Instructs Judge re; grand jury investigation. Photo only. By K R Chamberlain. The Masses. November 1914.
COLORADO JUSTICE
``````````
Although we welcome the news that Brother Uhlich has been acquitted of murder in the death of Brother Mack Powell, we would point out that no acquittal can ever restore to Uhlich the many long months that he has spent in that filthy jail in Trinidad. The news accounts below state that Mack Powell was a cowboy. We will remind our readers that Brother Powell was a union miner who was working as a cowboy and was shot off his horse by mine guards when these guards attacked the Ludlow Tent Colony in October of 1913.

From the El Paso Herald of May 22, 1915:

UHLICH WOULD PROVE ALIBE AS DEFENCE AGAINST CHARGE

Trinidad,Colo., May 22.-Denial that he was at Ludlow on Oct.9, the day that Mack Powell was shot and killed, and that he took any part in the battle between strikers and deputies, was made on the witness stand this morning by Robert Uhlich, on trial for his life. The testimony of the defendant, which was short, balanced the testimony to establish a complete alibi offered by a number of witnesses Friday.

-----
From the El Paso Herald of May 24, 1915:
UHLICH MURDER CASE GOES TO THE JURY

Trinidad, Colo., May 24.-Two and a half hours of argument this morning to be followed by four hours of argument this afternoon was to conclude the trial of Robert Uhlich, former president of the Trinidad Miners' union, on trial for his life for the murder of Mack Powell, a noncombatant, during a battle between strikers and deputies on Oct. 9, 1913.

The case will go to the jury late this afternoon.

------
From the El Paso Herald of May 25, 1915:
UHLICH IS ACQUITTED OF CHARGE OF MURDER

Trinidad, Colo., May 25.-On the jury's first ballot, Robert Uhlich, a union leader, was acquitted Monday night of a charge of murder of Mack Powell, a cowboy, Oct. 9, 1913. Powell was killed in a fight between mine guards and strikers near Ludlow during the coal strike.

-----
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Reposted from Hellraisers Journal by JayRaye

The capitalist class is always on strike against the working class.
-Mary R Alspaugh

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Tuesday May 25, 1915
From the International Socialist Review: Mary R. Alspaugh on the Colorado Miners

Refugees from Ludlow in Trinidad from International Socialist Review of June 1914, search link with
Readers of Hellraisers will recall the description by Mrs. Alspaugh, featured in the April edition of the Review, which told of the hardships endured by the former strikers in Colorado since the end of the strike. In this month's International Socialist Review, an article by Mary Alspaugh again offers a look into the strike and it's aftermath from the point of view of a class-conscious miner's wife.

Mrs. Alspaugh offers some thoughts about the over-powering forces summoned by the capitalist class to crush the miners and their families as they struggle for a decent standard of living. And she deplores the lack of class-consciousness that prevails in mining camps:

During the strike here the miners' wives and daughters organized a woman's auxiliary. A discussion came up in one of the meetings as to whether or not we should patronize a certain merchant who was accused of being "unfair." In fact, there was strong evidence that he was unfair, but one member objected to any discrimination on the ground that she did not believe in "tearing down what it had taken a lifetime to build up." A very remarkable statement, it seemed to me, to come from a "strong union woman," especially in the face of the fact that this very class of people had robbed us of all we had slaved for all our dull, drab lives, and that the very merchant in question was at that moment undermining the Socialist movement—the hope of the laboring class.
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Reposted from Hellraisers Journal by JayRaye

I reside wherever there is a good fight against wrong-all over the country.
Wherever the workers are fighting the robbers I go there.
-Mother Jones

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Sunday May 16, 1915
Washington D. C. - Mother Jones Testifies Before Walsh Commission

Mother Jones at Ludlow, large
Mother Jones at Ludlow
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Mother Jones was called before the Commission on Industrial Relations last week and gave testimony regarding her many long years as an active participant in the struggles of working class men, women, and children to gain a better life under the present industrial system. At times she wept as she recounted the horrors of the industrial wars that she has witnessed first-hand.

Testimony of Mother Jones on May 13th
     As reported by the Chicago Daily Tribune:

'MOTHER' JONES TELLS OF AID
TO 'BOYS' ON STRIKE
-----


Industrial Board Paves Way to Hear
Her Cure for Unrest;
Haywood Again on Stand.
-----

Mother Jones on Cover of United Mine Workers Journal of Jan 21, 1915, Repaired by JtC
Washington, D. C., May 13-Tales of industrial wars from Pennsylvania to California during the last thirty-five years were recounted before the federal industrial commission today by Mrs. Mary Jones, the "Mother" Jones of scores of strikes.

"Mother" Jones told the history of her connection with industrial disturbances preliminary to her examination regarding causes and cures for unrest which will be undertaken tomorrow.

The commission today heard Prof. Frank J. Goodnow, president of Johns Hopkins University, and Harry A. Cyphers of South Bethlehem, Pa., on the treatment of labor in the courts, and concluded the examination of William D. Haywood of the Industrial Workers of the World...

"Mother" Jones on Stand.

"Mother" Jones was the next witness. When Chairman Walsh asked her residence she replied:

I reside wherever there is a good fight against wrong. I live wherever the workers are fighting the robbers.
Beginning with the Pennsylvania railroad strike at Pittsburgh in 1877, "Mother" Jones told of her efforts to help "the boys" in their various "fights." She told of leading an "army" about from mine to mine in the Pennsylvania coal strike of 1900, "Pulling out" the men at work.

She related a long story of strikes in West Virginia, Maryland, and Colorado. She described night marches with bands of strikers, battles with the militia, and of caring for strikers, killed and wounded, in strike riots.

The witness told of being carried out of Colorado by militiamen and of hurrying back on the heels of the escort that took her to the state line.

She described the horrors of industrial wars and at times tears streamed from her eyes as she told of the treatment of men, women, and children.

-----

[Photograph added.]

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Sat May 02, 2015 at 07:33 PM PDT

R.I.P. A Garden Grew in Oakland Today.

by jpmassar

Reposted from jpmassar by JayRaye

Oscar Grant Plaza filled Saturday afternoon with a couple hundred people come to the first #BlackSpring event in Oakland. The organizers came up with a great idea, an its already spread across the twitterverse.



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Reposted from Hellraisers Journal by JayRaye

Mr. Rockefeller is a pleasant-spoken young man.
He says he wants to help my boys in Colorado. This is what I want him to do.
I want him to do now what he has always had a chance to do
-Mother Jones

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Friday March 19, 1915
Denver, Colorado - CF&I President Jesse Welborn Says John D. Jr. Planing Visit Soon

From The Oregon Daily Journal of March 7, 1915:
                                                             

The Masses, July 1914, Cover by John Sloan
J. D. Rockefeller Jr., Will Inspect Mines
-----
Plans to Visit Colorado Early in April
to Get Information on Scene of Recent Labor Trouble.

Denver, March 6.-John D. Rockefeller Jr. Will probably visit Colorado early in April, but his trip will be confined to inspection of the properties of the Colorado Fuel & Iron company. This was the announcement of Jesse F. Welborn, president of the corporation, on returning here today from New York. The employment situation is to continue to be left to the local representatives of the Rockefeller interests, Welborn said.

----------

[Cover of July 1914 Masses added.]

From the current issue of The Masses:
"Now We Will Talk"
Drawn by R. K. Chamberlain

TEXT for Now We Will Talk by R K Chamberlain in The Masses of Mar 1915
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Reposted from Hellraisers Journal by JayRaye
You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Tuesday March 16, 1915
Washington D. C. - House Judiciary Committee Gives Judge Dayton Slap on Wrist

Fannie Sellins
Fannie Sellins
Judge Alston G Dayton, the judge who sent the beloved union organizer, Mrs. Fannie Sellins, to a West Virginia jail will not be impeached:
The evidence shows many matters of individual bad taste on the part of Judge Dayton—some not of that high standard of judicial ethics which should crown the federal judiciary—but a careful consideration of all the evidence and the attending circumstances convinces us that there is little possibility of maintaining to a conclusion of guilt the charges made, and impels us, therefore, to recommend that there be no further proceedings herein.
This was the report of the committee after many hours of testimony had been presented to the committee regarding the prejudicial conduct of the this judge, particularly with regards to his dealings with the United Mine Workers of America in the state of West Virginia.

Below our readers can find a portion of the testimony of Mrs. Fannie Sellins before the house sub-committee charged with investigating the conduct of Judge Dayton. Regarding the judge's opinion of her her work for the U. M. W., she testifies:

I know that one remark he said was there would be no more Mother Joneses springing up in West Virginia, no more women of her character; and he said
no self-respecting American woman would be affiliated with such an association.
 
From the Chicago Day Book or March 13, 1915:
                                                             
Judge Alston G Dayton, US District Court, West Virginia
Judge Alston G. Dayton
RESPECT OF COURTS,-The house judiciary committee, in the hours of perturbation over the pork in the different barrels, gave that federal judge, Dayton, of West Virginia, a gentle slap on the wrist. It dropped the impeachment proceedings, holding that, while in some instances his conduct had been "reprehensible," there was little possibility of maintaining the charges to a conclusion of guilt. The minority report, recommending impeachment, was rejected.

Uncle Sam is acquiring quite a collection of fellows on the federal bench who are quivering under Scotch verdict. It's elevating the judiciary.

-----
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Reposted from Hellraisers Journal by JayRaye
He said I ought to join some Charity Organization.
I told him if I had my way I would tear down every Charity Institution in the country to-day
[and] build on their ruins the Temple of Justice.
My plea was for Justice not Charity.
-Mother Jones

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Wednesday March 15, 1905
From Cincinnati Enquirer: Judge Jackson's Last Act on Behalf of Coal Companies

Who among us can ever forget the Massacre of the Raleigh County Miners of West Virginia? Judge Jackson also remembers and, thus, made sure to release their murderers as his last bit of work before leaving the bench. From yesterday's Enquirer:

LAST WORK
-----
Of Judge Jackson Was the Release of
Deputies Charged With Murder

SPECIAL DISPATCH TO THE ENQUIRES
African-American Coal Miners
Charleston. W. Va., March 13.-John Jay Jackson to-day wound up his career here as a United States Judge. He rendered his decision in the cases of Gaujot and Summers, growing out ot the famous Stanford City fight between miners and Deputy Marshals two years ago.

Gaujot and Summers were indicted for murder in the State Court in Raleigh county, and were taken before Judge Jackson on writs of habeas corpus. Their cases were heard more than a year ago, but this decision was held up pending an appeal in the cases of Laing and Hurt in similar cases decided by Judge Jackson and taken to Circuit Court of Appeals. He had released the men on the ground that they were acting as Deputy Marshals of the United States when the killing was done, and therefore were not amenable to state law. His decision was affirmed by the higher Court. He held the same way in the Gaujot and Summers cases, and they were both released from custody and bond to-day.

Judge Jackson's official life ends Wednesday, his resignation being made effective on that day.

----------
WE NEVER FORGET
William Dodson   
William Clark
Richard Clayton
----------
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Reposted from Hellraisers Journal by JayRaye
You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Thursday March 11, 1915
From West Virginia's Fayette Tribune: A Story of Survival in the Layland Mine

Layland Mine Disaster, Rescue Car, Bureau of Mines, Mar 2, 1915
The Rescue Car Arrives
``````````
A remarkable story of survival comes to us today from Fayette County, West Virginia, where 47 men emerged from the Layland Mine alive after all hope had been given up that they would be found among the living. Five men, who had barricaded themselves into a chamber and thus survived the after-damp for four days and four nights, walked out of the mine unassisted March 6th. About an hour later, 42 men where found by a rescue party behind the heavy barricade which had provided them with safe air to breath. These men, however, had no food and little water for the entire time that they were entombed.

In today's Fayette Tribune one of those miner's tells a remarkable story of survival. Sadly, he expresses little solidarity and much distain for the Italian miners who shared the dangers of the coal mines with him:
                                                             

A Survivors Story


"Dad" Whalen Tells of His Experience
in Layland Mine Where He was Held 4 Days

Thomas Whalen, aged 73, one of the survivors of the Layland disaster, enroute to his home at Wainright, Ohio, told a Charleston Post reporter the following story of his experience in the mine where he was held a prison four days:

I was working in the 24th room on No. 9 entry, over a mile and a half in the mine, when the explosion came. My son John, who is still at Layland recuperating from the effects of his experiences, was working in the same room with me. We were filling the third car when the shock came. We were panic stricken and started for the main entrance. The explosion seemed to life the top of my head off from my ears up. John yelled at me to come quick and we both ran. My lamp was a lard oil affair and went out but John had a carbide lamp that assisted us.

We tried to crawl out the main entry and failed. We then started back in the mine and bratticed ourselves in entry No. 10, with a line of brattice works three deep on either side of them. The larger part of the men with Will Derrick [probably Derenge, see below], my son John and myself were Italians and they made the air hideous in our little chamber with their yells and lamentations. The heroic work done by Will Derrick and my son John should be remembered, as I feel that they were the ones that saved the lives of all of us by using their heads and hands to the final result.

The one biggest terror that comes to a miner after an explosion is the gas that is known as the after damp. That was the reason that we tried so hard to make the chamber air tight. John found a piece of paper about size of a half of a newspaper and left it on the outside of the first brattice. He wrote on it that there were 42 of us behind the barricade. The five men that walked out of the mine Saturday morning had bratticed themselves in the same manner in entry No. 5. They had our lunch buckets, there were seventeen of these and plenty of good clean water. On Saturday morning they decided that they would make a try to get out and succeeded. They walked over a mile and a quarter, with naked lamps burning, and found their own way to the main entry.

Our main trouble in the mine, where we were entombed was the foreigners. They would continually start lighting cigarettes and muddy up the only drinking water we had. I was without food or water for ninety-five hours. All of this time was spent in anticipation of the arrival of the rescuers and it was the greatest joy of my life to hear them tearing down the wall that we had made airtight to keep out the damp. We lived in constant fear. At one time it was suggested that we make a move to release ourselves, but again the dread of the after-damp kept us inside. We were afraid that the naked lamps would cause an explosion and kill our rescuers.

Then we heard the rescuing party. The foreigners went nearly crazy. The American miners had to fight them back. That little chamber that had held so many precious lives rang out loud in thanks and echoed back the joyful sound to the innermost recesses where many of our friends were lying dead. While there was no fire the heat was so great that I felt like I was roasting alive. I could walk all right at first, as if nothing had happened, for about fifteen feet and then my knees gave way on me. An old piece of canvass lying nearby was brought into use and they improvised a stretcher for me.

You couldn't hear yourself talk when they brought us to the entrance of the mines. Mothers, wives and children were there and their heartrending cries of anguish over their loved ones who had not yet been found, were terrible. It made me feel miserable in the extreme, and where there had been an orderly crowd of young fellows calling me "Dad" and slapping me on the shoulder affectionately, there was a murtherin' bunch of Italians standing in a group nearby gibbering at the top of their voices.

The forty-two of us were taken to the dance hall and put to bed. Every comfort that was available was bestowed upon us. I remember asking for my tobacco. That was, you know, the first thing they gave me in the mine when they found us. They then gave me chewing gum and an apple. After we were at the dance hall, I had a little chicken broth and like edibles. I have been a miner for the last forty-five years but this was the first explosion that I have even been in, and I hope my last.

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Reposted from Hellraisers Journal by JayRaye
Think of the thousands who are killed every year and there is no redress for it.
We will fight until the mines are made secure and human life valued more than props.
-Mother Jones

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Thursday March 4, 1915
Fayette County, West Virginia - Rescue Efforts Continue at Layland Mine as Hope Fades

Mine safety, buckling props
Today's Fayette Tribune reports on the continuing rescue work at the Layland which was, according to mine inspectors, the safest mine in the New River District. Be that as it may, at least 170 men are entombed in the mine after a fierce explosion ripped through the mine. That explosion was felt up to ten miles away. The Tribune estimates that the death toll will be worse than that of the Eccles Mine Disaster and second only to the Monongah Disaster.

The Fayette Tribune further reports:

The force of the explosion at the mouth of the mine was something terrific. The heavy masonry about the mine entrance was blown out and the fall of earth over the mouth of the mine half closed it. A stone motor barn 50 yards from the mine had all the window sash blown out. Half a dozen houses near by had all the windows broken and one house occupied by a family named Bryan had a portion of the roof lifted off and household goods overturned and broken. Nobody was hurt in the houses or anybody outside the mine except the colored porter. The wires and connections of the fan was stopped for about half an hour. Until the fan was started dense black smoke poured out of the mine for several minutes. Ashes and soot settled over everything.

So unexpected was the explosion that everybody stood dumb about the mine for several minutes. Supt. Clapperton and a number of his Minden men were the first from the outside to go to the rescue. They reached Layland on a special train within an hour and a half.

UMWJ banner
While the death toll of these terrible mine disasters is horrific, Hellraisers would like to take a moment to remember also the miners who die each day alone or in groups under five which is the smallest number to be counted as a "mine disaster" by Bureau of Mines. Almost every issue of the United Mine Workers Journal contains reports like the one below from December 10th of 1914:
Slate Fall Kills Four Men
----------
Accident at Speedwell Catches Miners on Way
to Leave Work.

Terre Haute, Ind., Dec. 4.

Three men were killed and a fourth probably was fatally injured as the result of a slate fall at the Speedwell mine near West Terre Haute about 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon.

The Dead.

EMORY BENJAMIN, 315 North Eighth street, Terre Haute.
JOHN BONES, West Terre Haute.
JAKE DREICHT, West Terre Haute.

The injured man is John Miller, who lives in Terre Haute. His legs were broken and his right hand was crushed.

The accident occurred shortly after work under the ground had been stopped. The men were leaving their various working places and were walking to the bottom of the mine to catch the cage and come to the top....

----------
Injured Man Dies.

Terre Haute, Dec. 5.

John Miller, who was injured by a fall of slate at Speedwell mine, died last night of his injuries. Mr. Miller was injured internally.

----------
Our thoughts and prayers are with the miners and their families everywhere who face danger underground each day and have, with so much courage, established the mightiest union that the nation has ever known, the United Mine Workers of America.
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Reposted from Hellraisers Journal by JayRaye

Think of the thousands who are killed every year and there is no redress for it.
We will fight until the mines are made secure and human life valued more than props.
-Mother Jones

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Wednesday March 3, 1915
Fayette County, West Virginia - Massive Explosion at Layland Mine Entombs 170 Miners

Cherry (IL) Mine Disaster of 1909, McClures Magazine, Mar 1910
Waiting
``````````
There has been another major coal mine disaster in Fayette County, West Virginia, where only  a few weeks ago 21 men were killed at the Carlisle Coal Mine. Yesterday at 8:30 in the morning, a massive explosion blew up the Layland Mine, seven miles from Quinnimont, leaving 170 men entombed. One man who was making a delivery near to the mine was killed in the explosion, and nine men have been found dead within the mine so far. Ten men have been brought out alive, but unconscious.

Families gathered at the mouth of the mine to wait and pray as rescue attempts continued throughout the night. Rescue Car No. 8 of the United States Bureau of Mines reached the scene last night. A report received from the Bureau of Mines stated that one member of the rescue team had been killed. No further details on this man's death were given.

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