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View Diary: VT-Sen: Bernie Sanders is safe (151 comments)

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  •  It was like pulling teeth to get him (5+ / 0-)

    To accept the endorsement of the Democratic party so that we could put his name on the Democratic ballot last time out (to prevent the republicans from running a fake democrat on our ticket - there's no party registration in VT).

    Once the bear eats your friend, there's no one left to outrun. And it'll still be hungry.

    by radical simplicity on Tue Aug 02, 2011 at 08:06:13 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  Actually he turned down the nomination (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY, gabjoh, HoosierJay, Ana Thema, brein

      He was elected as an Independent, not as a Democrat.

      In 2006 he won the Democratic Senate nomination -  but it was as a write-in against 3 nuisance candidates (with 94% of the vote!) He wouldn't allow his name to be listed on the Democratic ballot - so the write-in route was the only way to give him the nomination.

      But even after that, he then declined the nomination.  (You can't be listed as an "Independent" on the Vermont ballot if you also accept a political party nomination.)

      Once he turned down the Democratic party nomination, that meant there was a vacancy for the Democratic nomination. The Democratic State Committee officially declined to fill that vacancy. As a result Bernie was running as an independent candidate, with no official Democratic candidate for US Senate (although he was endorsed by the DSCC and the Vermont Democratic Committe).

      While Bernie has  become much more open to working with Democrats (in DC and in Vermont), he has actually never been willing to accept a Democratic party nomination.

      Once social change begins,it cannot be reversed. You cannot uneducate the person who has learned to read...You cannot oppress people who are not afraid anymore.

      by terjeanderson on Tue Aug 02, 2011 at 08:30:16 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  We had him on the ballot under both (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        terjeanderson, MichaelNY, wishingwell

        He turned down the nomination after he won, but he was on the ballot as I/D.

        I was one of the democratic state committee delegates who voted to endorse him in order to get that D next to his name. The cajoling required to get him to very reluctantly agree to let us put him there was substantial....

        Once the bear eats your friend, there's no one left to outrun. And it'll still be hungry.

        by radical simplicity on Tue Aug 02, 2011 at 09:02:57 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I just checked the SoS website to make sure (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          MichaelNY, HoosierJay, Ana Thema, lyta

          that I wasn't misremembering.

          According to the official 2006 election returns,  he did not have a D next to his name, just "Independent"

          According to the SoS:  

          " No candidate can have “independent” and a party name on the General Election ballot (candidate must choose one or the other)."

          The confusion you have may be because he accepted the Democratic Party "endorsement" -- meaning he accepted the support of the Party, but but he has never been listed on any ballot with a "D" next to his name.

          Once social change begins,it cannot be reversed. You cannot uneducate the person who has learned to read...You cannot oppress people who are not afraid anymore.

          by terjeanderson on Tue Aug 02, 2011 at 09:19:03 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Primary (4+ / 0-)

            The Secretary of State's office lists it as a write-in because the candidate did not seek to be on the party's ballot, the name was on the ballot because of a signature gathering process, instead. But it was, indeed, there. This is what we did:

            It was a HUGE effort to make it happen:

            WASHINGTON -- Vermont's Democratic Party is maneuvering to keep the Democratic candidates for the state's open US Senate seat off the November ballot, as party leaders seek to clear the way for independent Representative Bernard Sanders in his bid for the Senate.

            State Democratic leaders are spearheading efforts to gather signatures to put Sanders on the ballot as a Democrat, even though Sanders has repeatedly said he would turn down the party's nomination if he wins the primary. At least three other candidates have announced their intention to run for the Democratic nomination in the Sept. 12 primary, but party leaders prefer Sanders to any of them.

            Ian Carleton, the chairman of the Vermont Democratic Party, said the party's efforts to secure the nomination for Sanders is a concession to political reality: Polls indicate that Sanders is so popular in Vermont that no Democrat has a real chance of beating him.

            Carleton added that Sanders has largely supported Democratic priorities and was the only candidate to ask for the state party committee's endorsement.

            [/snip]....

            We were successful at getting him on the democratic party's primary ballot. Ian Carleton's email addy is: icarleton_ReplaceWithAtSign_sheeheyvt.com drop him a line if you want confirmation.

            Or read this Concord Monitor article:

            Sanders easily beat four men who have been perennial candidates. He has traditionall run as an independent, but the Democratic Party already has endorsed him and helped get his name on the primary ballot even though he'll turn down the nomination.

            Bernie did, indeed, turn down the nomination when won the primary, but he did accept our endorsement so we could go forward with the signature gathering to get his name on the democratic primary ballot.

            He got 35,954 votes (vs 2,232 for all other candidates combined) in the democratic primary. This is because people only had to check a box to vote for him. The numbers would have been very different if voters had to (a) know he was running in the democratic primary, even though he was not on the ballot, and (b) correctly write his name in the space.

            That's why we went through all the effort to put his name there. It took months of effort on the part of dozens of people to make it happen.

            People run in primaries on multiple tickets all the time in VT. The current Orange County Sheriff ran as an R/D this last time.

            The General election requires the candidate pick a maximum of one party affiliation, but a candidate could run on every party's ticket in the primary.

            Once the bear eats your friend, there's no one left to outrun. And it'll still be hungry.

            by radical simplicity on Tue Aug 02, 2011 at 10:19:45 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  You're right! (5+ / 0-)

              I was the was misremembering the way the scenario rolled out.... I had previously written-in in Bernie in Democratic Congressional primaries (contests that he had won as a write-in but turned down the nomination), so I obviously was confusing that with 2006, where I didn't remember that he was listed on the Democratic primary ballot. (I actually found a Democratic 2006 sample ballot at the SoS website, absolutely confirming that you are completely correct in your memory).

              I suspect he could have won as a write-in in the 2006 primary, although he obviously was much easier with him on the ballot.

              ----

              Slight correction on the multiple party thing though

              A candidate can only be listed on one primary ballot, but if they win other party nominations via write-in, they can have all of those nominations in November.

              For example, in 2008 Peter Welch won the Republican nomination for Congress as a write, and was listed on the general election ballot as D/R. Put Peter could only enter one primary (Democratic), and any other primary victories had to be as write-ins. Tim Ashe and Anthony Pollina both were formally entered in the Democratic primaries for state Senate, but then they got enough write-ins in the Progressive Party primary to have also win that nomination, and they were listed as D/P in November.

              But a candidate can not be listed as an "Independent" and also as the nominee of another Party -- that's why Bernie can't run as an "Independent/Democrat" or an "Independent/Progressive" or any similar thing. Vermont law even actually prevents any from creating a party with the word "Independent" in the name, so that voters won't confuse that party with authentic "independent" candidates.

              Once social change begins,it cannot be reversed. You cannot uneducate the person who has learned to read...You cannot oppress people who are not afraid anymore.

              by terjeanderson on Wed Aug 03, 2011 at 05:46:01 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

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