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View Diary: McCaskill: No jobs bill this year (199 comments)

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  •  What does patent reform even mean? (11+ / 0-)

    I don't like the sound of it...in the past it has meant making it easier for large corporations to hold a monopoly on intelectual property rights. And if it's "bipartisan" it can't possibly be good, IMO. Not with this congress.

    Trade agreements with South Korea? Gag me with a stick. We need protectionism, not more fucking free trade deals.

    More deregulation...lmao.

    These policies might create jobs and wealth, but not here, and not for people like us.

    Will work for food
    Will die for oil
    Will kill for power and to us the spoils
    The billionaires get to pay less tax
    The working poor get to fall through the cracks
    -James McMurtry

    -9.75/-8.26

    by SwedishJewfish on Tue Aug 09, 2011 at 12:42:40 PM PDT

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    •  In this case it's just the opposite. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      eztempo

      It's to prevent patent trolls from strangling innovation.

      I'll Rochambeau you for it.

      by Rich in PA on Tue Aug 09, 2011 at 12:46:54 PM PDT

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      •  Yeah, we see how the whole IP legal beagle schmeer (0+ / 0-)

        has done such a good fucking job of "breathing" innovation. What happens if I use my own name, which starts with "Mc," to start a business, any bets on how long it will be before I get a threatening letter from some law firm "representing" the Golden Archers? And of course there's the offensive use of patents on so many other fronts, and the wonderful applications of the "ruleoflaw" to outfits like MSFT that do steal the inspirations and innovations of others.

        Patent Trolls? Yep, but it sure looks to me like the whole fucking system lives under that bridge, waiting for the fat goats to try to cross..

        "Is that all there is?" Peggy Lee.

        by jm214 on Tue Aug 09, 2011 at 01:14:41 PM PDT

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      •  Fending off trolls? Phooey. Can we honestly think (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Aquarius40

        ... our patent system is the reason American companies aren't innovating? Because they're holding off all those great ideas for new business opportunities due to inadequate patent protection?

        Forgive me for being skeptical, but while there's no law that can't be improved, with all the delays inherently in the patenting process to begin with, reform or not, there is no way that patent reform will provide a discernible boost to this moribund economy.

        Obama and strong Democratic majorities in 2012!

        by TRPChicago on Tue Aug 09, 2011 at 01:21:38 PM PDT

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    •  Some jobs would be created immediately if (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      kck

      fed civil service would hire 100 new patent analysts.  There is a monster backlog of patents sitting in that office probably including duplicate applications.  It's very costly to apply for a patent, and one shouldn't have to wait 3-5 years for a clearance and patent, especially not in this rapidly advancing technological world.  Bush allowed the backlog to build by failing to approve budget increases needed to provide additional staff.  

    •  Speed up patents and strengthen challenges (0+ / 0-)

      The Patent Reform Act of 2011 already passed by Judiciary, has several main changes: a switch to the international standard of "first to file" , as opposed to "first to invent" and changes to the process of challenging patents that shouldn't have been granted.

      "First to file" will reduce the amount and quality of intellectual property and art needed to file and prevents any other filers from claiming to be the real original inventor. Clearly the process is faster, albeit easier to game as it favors the professional inventor and companies that have legions of engineers with support staff that just files patents made as broad as possible.

      Lots of big IT companies with the legal resources to rely on post patent court challenges are battling over the details.

      The Biotechnology Industry Organization, the National Association of Manufacturers, National Venture Capital Association, and the Association of American Universities are among those who support passage of the legislation in its current form. BIO represents more than 1,100 biotechnology companies including Johnson and Johnson (JNJ), Pfizer (PFE) and Merck (MRK) which should come as no surprise since the bill also covers areas of limiting potential damages resulting from litigation.

      Two other supporters of the bill are Microsoft and IBM but a group representing fourteen technology companies that include some of the biggest names in Silicon Valley — such as Apple, Google, Cisco, Intel and Symantec issued a statement Thursday saying that the senate judiciary bill still needs a lot of work. These companies are all part of a group called the Coalition for Patent Fairness which is a diverse group of companies and industry associations dedicated to enhancing U.S. innovation, job creation, and competitiveness in the global market by modernizing and strengthening our nation’s patent system. Coalition for Patent Fairness members include Adobe, Apple, Autodesk, Cisco, Dell, Google, Intel, Intuit, Micron, Oracle, RIM, SAP, Symantec, Verizon.

      Eliminate the Bush tax cuts Eliminate Afghan and Iraq wars Do these things first before considering any cuts

      by kck on Tue Aug 09, 2011 at 01:13:21 PM PDT

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