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View Diary: It's Happening to Me, Now (186 comments)

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  •  Don't be fooled, (5+ / 0-)

    I can laze with the best of them.

    and I wait for them to interrupt my drinking from this broken cup

    by le sequoit on Thu Aug 25, 2011 at 01:19:17 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  le sequoit, I saw this recent comment, (10+ / 0-)

      and wanted to catch up to you. 61, ex IT, engineer. Done.

      First, I wish you all the luck you can possibly hold for both of you.  My heart and soul goes to you both.

      Her eyes: my cousin from NY was in the Caribbean when he started having the same things happen with his eyes. It was awful. So I really understand the difficulty. He is an ex assistant principle, retired, and practicing psychologist.  He knows a lot and is smart like you guys.

      They did some deeper looking at his health because he continued to have problems with his eyes and also developed fatigue. The findings were a latent heart valve problem, and he has Borrelia, Bartonella and Babesia. This was looked at way late in the process. How much it was connected, can't say. But his energy and general health improved once he got past treatment start up. His eye problems have also been stabilized.  There may be more than one thing going on if they don't find an answer that makes sense as to why both eyes would spontaneously have problems at the same time.

      Finally, I don't understand the age Medicare starts these days. If I added correctly, you would be 67 years old before you can be on Medicare. Is that correct?

      I have read in a few posts that anyone born after 1960 can't qualify for SS until 67 as it is already.  So I am trying to understand what ages people qualify for theses programs.

      The issue of changing the qualifying age to 67 sounds like it has already been breached and is in the structure. Anyone, who can answer these questions, thank you.

      Again, I wish you luck on your book, and think you did the right thing by writing here.  You tell a story well. Using the personal to convey what whole demographics are going through is something most readers can relate to.

      I think a copy of this should be on every Senate and Rep's desk. There have been too many of these stories written as cries from the heart and just pouring out. But it is the story of our country now.

      Thank you again for taking the risk to put your life in front of all of us.

      Science is hell bent on consensus. Dr. Michael Crichton said “Let’s be clear: The work of science has nothing to do with consensus... which is the business of politics. Science, on the contrary, requires only one investigator who happens to be right,”

      by Regina in a Sears Kit House on Thu Aug 25, 2011 at 01:37:30 PM PDT

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      •  I'm afraid it won't get very far with (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Regina in a Sears Kit House

        my rep, the honorable Mr. Ryan. (and we had a Sears house once. Solid, but all those windows counterweights broke off)

        and I wait for them to interrupt my drinking from this broken cup

        by le sequoit on Thu Aug 25, 2011 at 01:52:06 PM PDT

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        •  le sequoit, went down to Mr. Regina, who has a (0+ / 0-)

          Kindle, and got a copy of your book. We will both take a look as we have the synch with MP3/Mac.

          When you have time, could you let me know about the age 67 on SS and/or Medicare. I just don't understand. I thought that was one of the big fights on the deficit reduction, and now I see in your story and in some others that age 67 is in place for some already.

          If there is a good link on SS and Medicare on age 67, shoot me there.  I am trying to understand this fight.

          Oh and by the way, in France the entire country had a hissy when they raised the age from 60 to 62 last fall.  The strikes were aimed at repeal.  From what I hear, when Sarkozy is out they will try to roll back that age change, in favor of more jobs for young people.

          I just heard a bizarre story from our town. Two school admins at the top of their salaries took early retirement and got into the highest tier of pension under state employment.  Then they did the right thing and...

          But no, they went back and took jobs as contractors doing what they had been doing instead of making room for two more.

          Huge fights in our local editorials about this. The most ardent opponent to the double dipping is a postal worker about in the retirement age group.  He is getting a lot of flak from those who think the school district is better off not having to fund benefits for two new hires.  It's getting ugly out here.

          Science is hell bent on consensus. Dr. Michael Crichton said “Let’s be clear: The work of science has nothing to do with consensus... which is the business of politics. Science, on the contrary, requires only one investigator who happens to be right,”

          by Regina in a Sears Kit House on Thu Aug 25, 2011 at 02:29:49 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Regina, if you're still looking at this diary, (8+ / 0-)

        here are some facts you need to know.  The following is based on current law -- who knows what Cat Food Commission II will do to us.

        You can begin getting Social Security retirement benefits at age 62.

        In 1983 (I think) the concept of "full retirement age" was introduced.  If you start your SS retirement benefits before you reach "full retirement age," your benefits will be reduced.  There's a sliding scale.  If you're 61, that means you were born in 1950.  For people born between 1943--1954 (includes me, too), your "full retirement age" is 66.  The current chart for other birth years is here.

        If you retire next year, when you turn 62, your retirement benefit will be reduced by 25%.  See this page.  The longer you wait, the closer to the full benefit you'll get (and if you wait past your full retirement age, you get more).

        Medicare is even more complicated.

        Assuming that you worked for at least 10 years in Medicare-covered employment, and you are getting Social Security benefits (because, e.g., you signed up at age 62), you are automatically enrolled in Medicare Part A on your 65th birthday.  You don't pay for it.  Medicare Part A is hospital coverage.

        Medicare Part B is physician coverage.  You generally have to pay for this.  As a result, Medicare gives you the option of not enrolling in this coverage.  There is a catch.  

        You have an "Initial Enrollment Period."  This runs from 3 months before your 65th b'day to 3 months after.  If you sign up for Part B in this period, you pay the going rate (currently, $96.40/month if you make less than $85,000).  If you do not enroll in the Initial Enrollment Period you are subject to a 10% penalty for every 12-month period you delay enrolling.  This penalty applies to your Medicare Part B premiums for as long as you continue to get Medicare.

        You are excused from the penalty if the reason you do not enroll in Part B is because you (or your spouse) are working and have a group insurance plan through your employer or union.  You have 8 months following the end of your employment to sign up for Part B.  COBRA -- which permits you to participate in your former employer's group insurance plan for up to 18 months -- does NOT count as an excuse for failing to enroll in Part B.  That is, if you wait until the end of the COBRA period to enroll in Part B, you will pay the penalty, notwithstanding that you were covered by your former employer's group insurance plan the entire time (ask me how I know this).

        We must drive the special interests out of politics.… There can be no effective control of corporations while their political activity remains. To put an end to it will neither be a short not an easy task, but it can be done. -- Teddy Roosevelt

        by NoMoJoe on Thu Aug 25, 2011 at 05:48:00 PM PDT

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        •  Amazingly thorough comment (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Regina in a Sears Kit House

          thank you!  I'm filing this one.

          Sarah Palin: All pistol and no squint.

          by CanyonWren on Thu Aug 25, 2011 at 07:29:50 PM PDT

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        •  Thank you NoMoJoe, this is amazing. It is (0+ / 0-)

          already a sliding scale for "full retirement". It doesn't seem that many people know about this.

          If you are up to it, it would be nice to see a post about this state of affairs.

          Thank you again.

          Science is hell bent on consensus. Dr. Michael Crichton said “Let’s be clear: The work of science has nothing to do with consensus... which is the business of politics. Science, on the contrary, requires only one investigator who happens to be right,”

          by Regina in a Sears Kit House on Thu Aug 25, 2011 at 07:34:01 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

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