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View Diary: The Myth of Failing Schools (216 comments)

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  •  Not only did we spend more money (0+ / 0-)

    when I went to school in the 60's and 70's, there was one other difference.  A large swath of the female population stayed home with the kids.  Economics have forced many women into the work force.  Sure I grew up in the era of Women's rights, but really what right did I gain?  The right to work or the need to work?  When I think of kids struggling in school or uninterested for a variety of reasons, I look for the underlying problem.  Sure, parents need to shoulder their share of the blame, but people need to understand why parents are unable to give their kids all the support they need to succeed in school.  Many parents do try very hard even those who work full time, but there are many others that don't have the energy, the skill or the focus to help their kids.  Some work hard just to keep a roof over their kids head and keep them safe and have nothing left after that.

    Loyalty to petrified opinion never yet broke a chain or freed a human soul in this world--and never will. Mark Twain

    by whoknu on Sun Aug 28, 2011 at 07:52:18 AM PDT

    •  I'll tell you what you gained. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      whoknu, Minnesota Deb, elfling
      The right to work or the need to work?
      You lost the need to get married in order to live. Personally, I don't want to ever be married, and I appreciate the fact that I do not have to either do that, teach, become a nurse, or prostitute myself in order to earn a living.

      Oh, and the women's movement that grew up in parallel with women's expansion in the workforce has also brought along changes in laws about sexual harassment and rape. Yes, we've slid backwards, but young women today can at least put a name to these things, instead of calling them just "part of life."

      So, yes, you've gained an awful lot, and, quite frankly, it irks me to see women whine about how they wish we were still back in the '50s in social-justice terms.

      •  Uh, I think you are reading (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Minnesota Deb, elfling

        WAY too much into my comment.  I am not suggesting IN ANY WAY that we go back to the 50's or that women should not work.

        What I am suggesting is that we recognize what has changed since the 50's and how it has impacted our children in school.  Women working is not at all something I am against.  What I am against is women working without decent wages, decent hours, time off for family, healthcare, paid maternity leave, flexible/affordable good daycare... I could go on and on.  

        The American family has changed from the 50's in that in those days a family could actually live on one salary.  Today, most families need two salaries just to survive.  Women often don't have a choice whether they want to work during the time that they are raising a child.  I did not have that choice because I could not afford NOT to work even in a two parent family.  I had to take both my kids to daycare at the age of 6 wks.  Some people don't even have that minimal choice.  If they were to take 6 wks off, they would be destitute by the time they went back to work.  

        I remember when the law allowing 6wks maternity was passed and I remember when I found out it didn't apply to me if my boss could prove that my job was so 'critical' that they didn't have to hold it open.  Oh sure, I kept my salary (they couldn't take that), but lost the job I had worked towards for many years.  My boss said she dropped her kid off at daycare at 6:30 in the morning and picked him up at 6:00 at night.  Her meaning was that I was expected to do the same.  I rejected that idea and quit.  I was lucky.  I could have not had the option to quit.  

        Thanks for the insult btw based on words you put in my mouth.   Show me where I said this;

        ...it irks me to see women whine about how they wish we were still back in the '50s

        As someone who has been alive through much of the woman's movement in the 60's and 70's and beyond; as someone who realizes exactly what I have gained and what I myself have fought for, and for someone who understands exactly at what price and how far we have yet to go, it's always appreciated when I am called a whiner...

        Loyalty to petrified opinion never yet broke a chain or freed a human soul in this world--and never will. Mark Twain

        by whoknu on Sun Aug 28, 2011 at 11:27:42 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Oh, and I might add (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      catwho, Cassandra Waites, whoknu

      that poor women and women of color have always worked. It's only middle-class white women, and only for a relatively short period of history, who had the option not to.

      •  And didn't we see (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        i like bbq

        a gap in learning in the children for that group too?  Many studies have proven that low income students perform worse.  Isn't it a fact that the 'women of color' who have always had to work, have also been historically considered low income?

        AGAIN, this does not mean that I support going back to the 50's.  You are missing my point.

        The point is, if we understand that when both parents or a single parent work it may be a contributing factor to their child's performance in school, then we work to;

        1- Improve support for working women with children starting at maternity leave through daycare, sick time, and school functions.
        2- Improve wages for all workers so that a family has more options, and more family time
        3- Figure out new ways to address achievement gaps that does not just blame the parent (or the teacher) for poor performance.

        Loyalty to petrified opinion never yet broke a chain or freed a human soul in this world--and never will. Mark Twain

        by whoknu on Sun Aug 28, 2011 at 12:07:18 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I'm all for all of that. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          whoknu, elfling

          Let me walk back the "whiner" comment, btw. I'm genuinely sorry. I've just dealt with way too many women of various generations who honestly do not realize how much they take for granted. (FWIW, I'm a GenXer.)

          •  Thank you (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            elfling

            I apologize too for getting kind of huffy.  

            Loyalty to petrified opinion never yet broke a chain or freed a human soul in this world--and never will. Mark Twain

            by whoknu on Mon Aug 29, 2011 at 06:00:46 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

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