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View Diary: Wisconsin: Public employee retirements higher than ever before (117 comments)

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  •  Well, quite a (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    drmah

    few of them are financially set.

    The baby boomers are retiring, so of course retirements are increasing, regardless of any retirements resulting from dissatisfaction.

    I know quite a few teachers who are now retired and living quite well, able to travel, living in very nice homes, etc.  So, yes, some of them are financially set.

    And when I worked a 6 month contract at the State recently, there were numerous retirements going on, and there were numerous employees who could retire but were simply hanging on for a few more years.  They would discuss retirement casually, like, oh, should I retire today or should I wait a couple of years--so, obviously, they weren't in great need and there was no urgency expressed [like, gosh, I gotta save up tens of thousands before I can retire!!].  Then again, these positions pay decently, so these long term employees have likely socked away a lot of $$.

    The banks have a stranglehold on the political process. Mike Whitney

    by dfarrah on Mon Sep 05, 2011 at 07:20:52 PM PDT

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    •  Disconnect these ideas (4+ / 0-)
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      nchristine, liberte, ggwoman55, ladybug53

      "now retired and living quite well, able to travel, living in very nice homes, etc."

      and

      "So, yes, some of them are financially set."

      The first doesn't mean the second, because one major illness or family crisis (or moving benefits goalpost) could wipe out this "financially set."  What number (with dollar signs) do you put on that status, "set?"  

      "Financially set" is increasingly becoming a pejorative meant to make those who stay long enough under good rules to have a reasonable chance at a good retirement out to be "rich people" and thus the enemies of we who don't.  "Could retire but were simply hanging on for a few more years" doesn't mean they weren't doing their jobs, doing them well, and perhaps even enjoying them.

    •  These people are married to people who work in (4+ / 0-)
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      drmah, liberte, ggwoman55, ladybug53

      The private sector.  That's how they become "comfortable".

      You have no idea, nor does anyone else, how another person makes his/her money.  I once taught with someone who traveled all over the world - we couldn't figure it out.  Then we found out his wife's family were mega-millionaires.  I mean mega.  Loads of my friends have spouses who work in the private sector, and that's how they get "comfortable."

      •  The ones at (0+ / 0-)

        the state are not even married; they are single.

        The other ones I know of are couples of teachers or a combination of public worker plus a teacher [for example, a teacher plus a parole officer].

        Frankly, the whole notion that public workers are underpaid is a myth.  At least for federal employees and state employees in Colorado and Texas.  I used to work for the FDIC, and the pay was fine.  And throughout the years, I've seen job openings in Texas and Colorado, and both had decent salaries for the posted jobs.  Even the clerical salaries were good in Texas [which is kind of hard to believe].  

        Until recently, when repubs started messing with bene's and reitirement plans, I don't see how public employees can complain.  Even teachers get 3 months off, even if they have to study in that time frame.  

        The banks have a stranglehold on the political process. Mike Whitney

        by dfarrah on Tue Sep 06, 2011 at 06:09:34 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  dfarrah: methinks you enjoy (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Puddytat, liberte

      tugging your fishing line with a fat ol' surface plug as your boat slowly motors on.

      Looks like you got a few strikes here.

      But I'm calling you out.  It's clear from your histroy that you're a troll.   Go back to priso!planet.com or re!state or whereever hell you call home.

       

      It is an old strategy of tyrants to delude their victims into fighting their battles for them. --FDR

      by Rube Goldberg on Mon Sep 05, 2011 at 09:00:33 PM PDT

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    •  From the first paycheck you receive as a beginning (3+ / 0-)
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      liberte, ggwoman55, nchristine

      teacher you are required to make a "Contribution" to the Teacher's Retirement Plan. (In Indiana that's 3% of what you earn.) The point the Limbaugh and the Republicans make never recognizes is the majority of the money in a teacher's retirement account is from personal savings made throughout a teaching career,  It is a false criticism to blame teachers from taking away from the state.  Most of the money in any one teacher's account is from their own personal savings.

      I resent your attitude that I should not spend the money I saved in whatever way I see fit.  Who are you to make that kind of evaluation?

      •  I don't know where (0+ / 0-)

        you got the idea that I object to the way people spend their retirement.

        The banks have a stranglehold on the political process. Mike Whitney

        by dfarrah on Tue Sep 06, 2011 at 06:16:26 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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