Skip to main content

View Diary: BREAKING: A Million in the Streets - Today Will Change Israel Forever | LiveBlog (266 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  So many young people- (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    joanbrooker, flitedocnm, fhcec, Matt Z

    and I'm wondering what they believe their future holds in this country?

    What do they see ahead for themslves?

    Are they concerned about their qualitry of life?

    Are they concerned about their prospects for a sustainable existence?

    How about their ability to be self-supporting-and their ability to care for those they love and care about?

    At this moment-everything hangs in the balance in this country.

    We are actually in fear for our later years--and our concern for our nation's young people-and their collective future--- is profound.

    Why does it seem as though we're fighting this battle alone?

    "Power is a fleeting thing. One day your souls will be required of you." Bishop Peter Storey---Central Methodist Mission, Johannesburg, June 1981

    by lyvwyr101 on Sat Sep 03, 2011 at 12:52:16 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  Possibly becuz they feel no sense of empowerment (7+ / 0-)

      at all -- that it doesn't matter what they do, or say, or protest about, because the deck is so stacked against them, by powerful interests with lots and lots of money. It's not that they don't care, it's that they don't think that anyone else cares what they think, and nobody will pay any attention. And it's very hard to blame them, because to a very great extent, that perception is very accurate.

      Maybe it's up to the generation that grew up in the sixties and seventies, we who have done this before, helping them to understand that they do have a voice -- but it will take a lot of work, and dedication, and perseverance.

      People like Bill McKibben are the perfect role models.

      "But there is so much more to do." - Barack Obama, Nov. 4, 2008

      by flitedocnm on Sat Sep 03, 2011 at 02:33:42 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes we do have to try. But it's very difficult. (6+ / 0-)

        They certainly don't feel any sense of empowerment.

        I look at what happened in Wisconsin as inspiring and certainly in Israel today.  At some point I do believe we must take to the streets and soon.  It seemed so organic in the 60s and my question is how can that passion for justice and equality be reignited once again.  I have said more than a few times that if we had a national draft/service requirement for everyone, the dialogue today would be very different.

        •  Yes, you are absolutely right, the dialogue, and (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          alizard, neroden, lyvwyr101, Matt Z

          the situation in which we find ourselves today, might be very different today if there were still a draft.

          Doing away with the draft, while it seemed like a good thing to do at the time, has been more responsible than any other development for the military industrial complex becoming as dominant in our society as it is today.

          The devastating war in Iraq, and all of its horrendous consequences including our crippling national debt that's now being used as the hammer to destroy the middle class, probably never would have happened if there were still a draft.

          "But there is so much more to do." - Barack Obama, Nov. 4, 2008

          by flitedocnm on Sat Sep 03, 2011 at 04:43:26 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Oh yes. I am completely with you. (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            flitedocnm, neroden, lyvwyr101, Matt Z

            Ironically, at the time, I had three younger brothers who were part of the 'lottery' just before the draft was ended and they were spared.  I was one of the many who thought the idea of a volunteer army was a great idea.  I realize now what a disaster that was.

            And this:  

            The devastating war in Iraq, and all of its horrendous consequences including our crippling national debt that's now being used as the hammer to destroy the middle class, probably never would have happened if there were still a draft.

            Perfectly stated.

            •  Looking at the long view of military history (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              joanbrooker, Eiron, lyvwyr101

              It turns out drafts tend to go away when military technology doesn't favor huge conscript armies.

              We're in a tech period where it doesn't.  (Actually, since before Vietnam.)

              Historically, I spot three basic periods of military technology, which go in cycles:

              -- those which favor smallish professional armies
              -- those which favor large conscript armies
              -- those which favor guerrilla tactics and local militias

              The 18th - 19th century featured a shift from the small professional army to the large conscript army.  There was an earlier shift in the late Middle Ages from the guerrilla and militia to the professional army (and a yet earlier shift from the professional army of the Roman period to the militia of the Middle Ages).

              We are now in a period which favors guerrilla tactics and local militias, though we still have some tech leftovers of the professional military period (air war stuff mostly).  Most of the people in the US military have not caught on, though some of the War College types seem to have figured it out completely.

              Read pp. 1-7 of Krugman's _The Great Unraveling_ (available from Google Books). NOW.

              by neroden on Sun Sep 04, 2011 at 02:09:30 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

        •  We have the passion. (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          joanbrooker, lyvwyr101, flitedocnm

          I'm in my 30s, but people younger than me do care.

          The key point is that it really doesn't seem like what we do is effective.  Street protests?  Well, except when they're actually violently disruptive (G20 / G8) they've been completely ignored.  And there are youth involved heavily in the G8 / G20 protests -- and those are still not very effective.

          At some point people are going to gel on an effective tactic and things will snowball very fast.  I just hope it isn't a fraudulent fascist pseudo-populist leader who diverts the masses before we succeed.

          Read pp. 1-7 of Krugman's _The Great Unraveling_ (available from Google Books). NOW.

          by neroden on Sun Sep 04, 2011 at 02:04:37 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  The draft would have helped-tremendously- (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          flitedocnm

          but-what young people are facing today is just as devastating:

          Poor quality in education
          Poor chances for employment
          Poor possibilities for advancement
          Poor quality of life
          Poor capability to be self-supporting
          Poor capacity to provide for the future

          The future: the opportunities for young people in this country: Poor.

          The ability of those of us in our later years to have any quality of life: Poor

          Capacity and opportunity for all of us-are decreasing daily in this country-based on legislation-and our elected officials.

          "Empower" is a great word.

          As a people-we need to decide which we want in this country?

          Poor-or Empower-which is it?

          "Power is a fleeting thing. One day your souls will be required of you." Bishop Peter Storey---Central Methodist Mission, Johannesburg, June 1981

          by lyvwyr101 on Sun Sep 04, 2011 at 07:19:02 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Anti-Iraq-War protests were enormous (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        lyvwyr101, flitedocnm

        and were simply ignored.  By Bush and by Obama.  And by the media.

        Youth in this country are simply trying to figure out what tactics are going to actually work.  

        Once people gel on a tactic which seems to be working -- as in the Wisconsin occupation of the Capitol building -- an enormous number of additional people will show up and join.  A lot of people don't want to "shoot their wad" on something which isn't going to work.

        Read pp. 1-7 of Krugman's _The Great Unraveling_ (available from Google Books). NOW.

        by neroden on Sun Sep 04, 2011 at 02:01:59 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  We've done it before-we can do it again- (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        flitedocnm
        Maybe it's up to the generation that grew up in the sixties and seventies, we who have done this before, helping them to understand that they do have a voice -- but it will take a lot of work, and dedication, and perseverance.

        People like Bill McKibben are the perfect role models.

        We have the numbers-we have the voice.

        "Power is a fleeting thing. One day your souls will be required of you." Bishop Peter Storey---Central Methodist Mission, Johannesburg, June 1981

        by lyvwyr101 on Sun Sep 04, 2011 at 06:55:54 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I don't know. These are great questions. (6+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      poco, alizard, Just Bob, betson08, lyvwyr101, Matt Z

      I teach at an arts college and it is astounding how uniformed the majority of them are about local and world events.  Many of them don't even know who their senator is.  I wonder how bad it has to get before they wake up.

      I also wonder why more hasn't been written about this here and on other progressive sites--how do we get them involved in the fight, how can we communicate that it's essential they become active and join us?  

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site