Skip to main content

View Diary: The Mass Imprisonment Failure (38 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  Someone's making money (15+ / 0-)

    I don't think there's much question that there's a Prison Industrial Complex that's somehow gotten worse over the last 10 years:

    "The private contracting of prisoners for work fosters incentives to lock people up. Prisons depend on this income. Corporate stockholders who make money off prisoners' work lobby for longer sentences, in order to expand their workforce. The system feeds itself," says a study by the Progressive Labor Party, which accuses the prison industry of being "an imitation of Nazi Germany with respect to forced slave labor and concentration camps."

    The prison industry complex is one of the fastest-growing industries in the United States and its investors are on Wall Street. "This multimillion-dollar industry has its own trade exhibitions, conventions, websites, and mail-order/Internet catalogs. It also has direct advertising campaigns, architecture companies, construction companies, investment houses on Wall Street, plumbing supply companies, food supply companies, armed security, and padded cells in a large variety of colors."

    According to the Left Business Observer, the federal prison industry produces 100% of all military helmets, ammunition belts, bullet-proof vests, ID tags, shirts, pants, tents, bags, and canteens. Along with war supplies, prison workers supply 98% of the entire market for equipment assembly services; 93% of paints and paintbrushes; 92% of stove assembly; 46% of body armor; 36% of home appliances; 30% of headphones/microphones/speakers; and 21% of office furniture. Airplane parts, medical supplies, and much more: prisoners are even raising seeing-eye dogs for blind people.

    Wall Street's screwing us coming and going. They're like flies on an open casket.

    This ain't no party. This ain't no disco. This ain't no foolin' around!

    by Snud on Tue Sep 13, 2011 at 08:32:10 PM PDT

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site