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View Diary: Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest: 9/19 (115 comments)

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  •  Mark Halperin is a dingbat, part 63,252 (8+ / 0-)

    On Halperin's The Page web site this morning:

    On MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” Halperin says President Obama's failure to include Social Security in his deficit reduction plan is a surprising missed opportunity.

    Yup, that'll play well in an election!

    It's people like Halperin being on payroll that makes me look down with contempt on today's tradmed.  Poor journalism compounded by poor judgment is the norm.  There are exceptions, like Chuck Todd and his political team at NBC, but they are too few.  MSNBC puts people like dingbat Halperin and racist and otherwise all-around bigot Pat Buchanan on payroll.  CNN pays Erick Erickson and once gave Glenn Beck his own show.  Fox is Fox, everyone is a useless dunce there.

    The decline of the news media is a big problem.  And of course it's unreported, because the institution itself won't report critically or honestly on itself.

    This makes me glad we have the internet.  We need it for sharing information and engaging in political activity to make up for the tradmed's deep failure.

    It's because of the above that I give more money than ever before to candidates and parties, and try to volunteer more.  That's the best vehicle to cut through the clutter of media noisemaking.

    43, male, Indian-American, married and proud father of a girl and a boy, Democrat, VA-10

    by DCCyclone on Mon Sep 19, 2011 at 06:50:43 AM PDT

    •  Buchanan (0+ / 0-)

      I've actually grown to like listening to Pat buchannan, not for what he says but how he explains it.  His logic, if not exactly his beliefs, are carried by a huge portion of the GOP.  Listening to him helps you understand how the GOP thinks, which isn't always found in the Beck's and Erickson's of the world.

      He also seems to be willing to call a spade a spade, which it seems some other people won't.

      •  Your last sentence (7+ / 0-)

        is particularly inapt when talking about an unreconstructed racist.

        Formerly Pan on Swing State Project

        by MichaelNY on Mon Sep 19, 2011 at 08:14:33 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Beck & Erickson are "how the GOP thinks" (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Zack from the SFV, MichaelNY

        Republicans don't think straight.  They are a jumbled mess.  The D.C. GOP electeds are pretty good at gamesmanship and the spin war, but Buchanan isn't part of that and knows nothing of it.  Otherwise, the jumbled mess that are Beck, Erickson, et al. are a better reflection of today's GOP than Buchanan.  But they are all racists.  The only difference is that Buchanan also is anti-semitic.

        43, male, Indian-American, married and proud father of a girl and a boy, Democrat, VA-10

        by DCCyclone on Mon Sep 19, 2011 at 09:04:37 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Buchanan is an all-purpose religious bigot (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          jncca, MichaelNY

             not just an anti-semite.  He doesn't like Islam and he also has disparaged my (non)-religious peeps--atheists and agnostics.

              I've often wondered if he is even more backward thinking than President Buchanan, whose term ended 150 years ago. (James Buchanan was one of the forgettable ones before Lincoln.)

          Diehard Swingnut, disgruntled Democrat, age 53, new CA-30

          by Zack from the SFV on Mon Sep 19, 2011 at 12:17:00 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  i'd compare him to woodrow wilson (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Zack from the SFV, MichaelNY

            who was in the KKK.

            if the KKK were socially acceptable to be a part of, buchanan would certainly be in it

            18, D, new CA-18 (home) new CA-13 (college). Economic liberal, social libertarian, fiscal conservative. Put your age and CD here :) -.5.38, -3.23

            by jncca on Mon Sep 19, 2011 at 01:39:22 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Wilson was in the KKK? (0+ / 0-)

              I know that Wilson had poor connections with the black community (one example is when he viewed "Birth of a Nation" at the WH), but I had no idea it was this bad.

              'The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.' -Mohandas K. Gandhi

              by KingofSpades on Mon Sep 19, 2011 at 01:43:09 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  now that i think about (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                KingofSpades

                it harding might have been the one in the KKK

                regardless, both wilson and harding were supporters of the organization

                18, D, new CA-18 (home) new CA-13 (college). Economic liberal, social libertarian, fiscal conservative. Put your age and CD here :) -.5.38, -3.23

                by jncca on Mon Sep 19, 2011 at 03:57:17 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  wilson's racism (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  KingofSpades, MichaelNY
                  Wilson took his southern outlooks and feelings towards race with him to the White House. Almost upon taking office, he fired most of the African Americans who held posts within the federal government, and segregated the Navy, which until then had been desegregated. Many of the newly segregated parts of Wilson’s federal government would remain so, clear into the 1950s.

                  http://www.suite101.com/...

                  18, D, new CA-18 (home) new CA-13 (college). Economic liberal, social libertarian, fiscal conservative. Put your age and CD here :) -.5.38, -3.23

                  by jncca on Mon Sep 19, 2011 at 04:01:36 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

      •  He's grandfatherly. (0+ / 0-)

        He's that Archie Bunker-style grandpa you can listen to whether you agree with him or not.  Although he certainly should not be on TV.

        'The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.' -Mohandas K. Gandhi

        by KingofSpades on Mon Sep 19, 2011 at 09:07:39 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Missed opportunity? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DCCyclone

      The only missed opportunity is to not raise the FICA cap.

      'The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.' -Mohandas K. Gandhi

      by KingofSpades on Mon Sep 19, 2011 at 09:10:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yup, which of course the media opposes (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        KingofSpades, Zack from the SFV

        The fundamental problem with the political media's "journalism" in reporting on entitlement issues is that they personally don't think they'll ever need Medicare, social security, or anything else.  So they personally favor slashing those programs.  That's really what it's all about.  But they refuse to admit, and perhaps are completely self-aware, that their personal affluence plays a role in how they perceive entitlements and how they in turn report on the subject.

        It's a major flaw.

        And it goes to the heart of how they, along with the Politifact dingbats and even Columbia Journalism Review, refuse to concede the Ryan plan abolishes Medicare, which it clearly does.  They tip their hand on their very own institutional bias.

        43, male, Indian-American, married and proud father of a girl and a boy, Democrat, VA-10

        by DCCyclone on Mon Sep 19, 2011 at 09:29:55 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Very odd that they think that, if true (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Zack from the SFV

          You have to be a millionaire several times over to be able to comfortably pay cash for real medical care in America.

          I know some journalists fit that description, but most don't.

          Ok, so I read the polls.

          by andgarden on Mon Sep 19, 2011 at 09:37:03 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Journalists who get exposure fit that description (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            andgarden, Zack from the SFV

            The people who get on TV and are most prominent online and in print are well-off enough that they don't expect to need those government programs.  They'll qualify for their fair share of benefits, but don't think they'll need them.

            Some of them are certainly wrong, and will find they need the help after all.

            But a lot of them probably will retire with full health benefits as part of the retirement package, in addition to nice retirement pay and whatnot.  They don't necessarily pay out-of-pocket per se.

            "Most" journalists, you are correct, aren't affluent.  But most journalists are not driving the debate.  The elite journalists drive media coverage of everything.

            It makes perfect sense that the people who aren't horrified by the Ryan plan and other similar social Darwinistic ideas are people who don't think they'll need the help.  If you think you might really need that help, you don't want anyone to touch it.  And that's most people.  But you wouldn't know that from media coverage.

            43, male, Indian-American, married and proud father of a girl and a boy, Democrat, VA-10

            by DCCyclone on Mon Sep 19, 2011 at 10:16:18 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  they're also operating in a DC bubble (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              DCCyclone, Zack from the SFV

              which is nearly entirely disconnected from the reality most Americans live.

              I changed by not changing at all, small town predicts my fate, perhaps that's what no one wants to see. -6.38, -4.15

              by James Allen on Mon Sep 19, 2011 at 10:38:27 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  For a long time, I've thought the best thing (0+ / 0-)

                Obama could do to draw attention to the gravity of the situation is to invite reporters and other media types to come with on a tour of distressed areas. Let them walk through downtown Detroit and then act as if everything is peachy.

                •  I don't think that's helpful (3+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  jncca, James Allen, askew

                  Reporters won't respond favorably to that.  They think what they think and cynically reject whatever elected officials say.

                  It's part of being in their bubble that they're uninterested in what's going on outside their bubble.

                  43, male, Indian-American, married and proud father of a girl and a boy, Democrat, VA-10

                  by DCCyclone on Mon Sep 19, 2011 at 11:24:09 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

          •  Well, that's probably true (0+ / 0-)

            if you are paying out of pocket for everything. I don't think anyone expects everyone to do that. Most of the people that talk about HSA/MSA-stye plans say that people will need catastrophic coverage and that the accounts are for regular check ups and other smaller things. Of course, is that there will always be some people who can't afford this, for whatever reason. We need to make a decision about how to approach it. The problem for us is that we are consistently fighting two different battles between those who don't want to do it at all and those who want to do it in a very different way from us, and this makes the actual politics very, very difficult.

      •  There's a really, truly bizarre strain of thought (0+ / 0-)

        that indicates that solving our fiscal problems in the future is heavily dependent on fixing Social Security. In reality, the fixes are fairly easily, from a policy stand point; we just need to make a decision. It's quite different from health care.

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