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View Diary: Israel's Tahrir [2]: First effect on electoral politics - Labor Party Revived (32 comments)

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  •  Thanks. Feel free to refer. The Web is open space. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    volleyboy1
    •  Thanks... I appreciate that (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      livosh1, Assaf

      I usually don't like to refer to or use people's blog stuff unless there is consent (at least in writing articles). You and I have our differences so I figured it would be the right thing to do to ask you just to make sure.

      Personally, from what I follow I am happy that Avodah might be rising particularly following the debacle that had occured. As you guess, I am probably more partial to them than to anyone else (particularly for their stance on economic issues) - though I am not Israeli so that really doesn't mean that much.

      BUT... this pollis very interesting. Check it out:

      Current Knesset seats in [brackets].
      22 24 [28] Kadima
      25 24 [27] Likud
      22 —  [08] Labor headed by Shelly Yacimovich
      –   18 [08] Labor headed by Amir Peretz
      15 16 [15] Yisrael Beitenu
      09 10 [11] Shas
      09 09 [07] Merger of Jewish Home and National Union
      06 06 [05] Yahadut Hatorah/U.T.J.
      04 05 [03] Meretz
      00 00 [05] Ehud Barak Independence Party
      08 08 [11] Hadash, Ra’am-Ta’al and Balad combined.

      Interesting... N.U. stands to gain some serious ground... Meretz picks up a seat, YB stalls, Likud loses 2 and Kadima loses 6....

      If Ariyeh Deri jumps in... That could massively affect the outcome of the 2013 election.

      What are your thoughts?

      DK4: For those times when pissing in the hummus isn't enough

      by volleyboy1 on Thu Sep 22, 2011 at 04:57:11 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Interesting numbers (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        volleyboy1, Assaf

        But . . . to the extent that Labor under Yacimovich draws its new support mainly from Kadima and Barak's party, this would do little to change the electoral balance, and Likud would be still sitting pretty with the best chance to form a new government.

        •  Oy....... CW will always be CW (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          volleyboy1

          Just a couple weeks ago I commented on a diary proclaiming that "Bibi cannot be toppled and elections are futile anyway nowadays" - that pretty consistently,

          in Israel, whatever the CW says about the future Knesset a year or so in advance of an impending election - it's a very good bet to predict the very opposite.

          Check it out.

          Anyway, as I said, as much as kibitzing is fun, we should continue focus on the type of activism that resets the national agenda.

          •  Well I can't disagree with that for Israel or for (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            livosh1, Assaf

            America.

            Activism is the only thing we have that can reverse neo-conservative (feudalistic) policies designed to destroy the Poor, Working and Middle Class that seem to have taken hold in both Washington and Jerusalem (and everywhere else).

            I was glad to see Avodah on the rise again but that is not enough from the Tent Protests. They can't  degenerate to some wonderful memories (as the '60's are here) they have to be continued or at least their goals have to be focused on.

            And here in the U.S. we can use these movements as ways to demand our own social justice and an end to class warfare perpetuated by the Republicans.

            DK4: For those times when pissing in the hummus isn't enough

            by volleyboy1 on Thu Sep 22, 2011 at 09:45:40 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  The key is whether (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            volleyboy1, Assaf

            this does anything to reset the national agenda.

            I don't want to be a Debbie Downer about this, but revitalizing Labor with someone who says nice things about the settlements may not reset the national agenda, and the fact that the polling numbers don't yet suggest otherwise should not necessarily be ignored.

            Anyway, here's J.J. Goldberg's mixed review of her.

            •  Read about her a bit. She's a real fighter. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              volleyboy1

              She has deliberately - and openly - focused on domestic issues. Many had ridiculed her for that.

              But once these very same issues brought half a million Israelis to the streets, she has been vindicated.

              She's not the one who reset the national agenda. The street did that. But she has anticipated it, and had advocated for it independently.

              Now she can shaft the other major parties in the campaign; they have absolutely nothing to sell to the public on domestic issues. All the while, she can keep the cards close to her chest on Palestinian issues. Which she probably will.

              And btw, no, she didn't "say nice things about settlements." In fact I hated what she said about settlements in her latest interview.

            •  Haaretz on Sep. 2 had an op-ed of rightist praise (0+ / 0-)

              "The campaign against Yachimovich
              "Yachimovich deserves support from her ideological opponents as well as from people in her camp."
              by Amiel Ungar
              Ungar
              A taste:  Yachimovich, unlike Sternhell, has no patience for those who lament an occupation that the Palestinians have perpetuated by refusing to agree to any terms that would legitimate a Jewish Israel, or who obsess on Palestinian suffering when the Palestinians harbor plans for our extinction.

              Lacking patience is not a credential for anything except destructiveness.

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