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View Diary: The End of Economic Growth (188 comments)

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  •  Slight Disconnect - Tightwad vs. "Local Grassfed, (1+ / 0-)
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    maryabein

    Organic" meat/dairy/eggs.

    I agree, this is the best, healthiest approach, but local grassfed, organic meat/dairy/eggs are more expensive than typical grocery store fare- so the tightwad strategy starts to fall apart.

    You also need a car to get to organic farms/co-ops- you're not going to get there by bus.

    Getting rid of your car, utilizing public transport- doable in an urban environment (some cities have better public transport than others)- not so much in a rural environment.

    Living w/o a car in the boonies is more or less impossible.

    "I don't feel the change yet". Velma Hart

    by Superpole on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 05:26:08 AM PDT

    •  A bit subtle... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SuWho
      I agree, this is the best, healthiest approach, but local grassfed, organic meat/dairy/eggs are more expensive than typical grocery store fare- so the tightwad strategy starts to fall apart.

      Really my argument is that people should avoid meat if possible because in their current form they are extremely energy intensive.  But I don't want to make that argument because everyone has their reasons for eating the way they do.

      As far as buying local veggies, etc. I've found that it's often the same price as the industrial veggies, and usually a lot more fresh.

      You also need a car to get to organic farms/co-ops- you're not going to get there by bus.

      There are a lot of CSAs that deliver their produce to a drop-off location that's close to where their customers are.  (I used to be part of one like that a couple of years ago.)

      Getting rid of your car, utilizing public transport- doable in an urban environment (some cities have better public transport than others)- not so much in a rural environment.

      I'd say this depends greatly upon what sort of rural town you live in (and when it was built).  Many small towns in New England, for example, are compact and walkable, surrounded by farmland.

      contraposition.org - thoughts on energy, the environment, and society.

      by barath on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 05:31:53 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Agreed - To a Point (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        barath, maryabein, Linda Wood, SuWho

        There have been times in my life when I was a "marginal vegan"; currently I eat almost no beef for the reasons you give. But I'm not going to give up dairy, yogurt and cheese specifically. Yogurt has calcium, protein, etc. and pro-biotics for the gut which make it a sort of super-food. Cheese for protein and calcium. Cheese combined with beans and corn or wheat tortillas gives you plenty of protein and I believe, all of the amino acids needed. Throw in some rice- even better.

        "Diet for a Small Planet" by Francis Lappe is all about combining foods for complimentary protein/amino acids nutrition.

        Veggies- I buy almost all local in the growing season.

        There's no question one can live simply-- but after 100 years or so on the consumer/fossil fuel, car-based economy- living simply will for some take a great deal of work, on top of the work they're already doing.

        The convenience of the current system, more or less everything one wants is at the local Safeway, combined with lack of time/energy to go the alternative route, will make the change to an alternative system tough.

        The reason the slow/simple path worked at one time is because one parent was home all day-- typically mom. but mom is out in the work force now.

        "I don't feel the change yet". Velma Hart

        by Superpole on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 05:52:13 AM PDT

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        •  Elizabeth Warren and Amelia Tyagi (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          offgrid, Superpole

          have written a book apparently on the problems of the Two-income household. I say apparently because I'm still trying to find a copy. It's called,

          The Two-Income Trap: Why Middle-Class Mothers and Fathers Are Going Broke.

          I understand their point to be that the second income has just gone to the banks as interest on mortgages and credit cards, to the cost of childcare, and to the cost of an additional car, and that families are worse off, not better off, than they were as one-income households.

          Your point that,

          The reason the slow/simple path worked at one time is because one parent was home all day-- typically mom. but mom is out in the work force now.

          is so important because we largely ignore that the parent who was at home actually performed work that was of value to the family and that the second income hasn't made up for that work or for the value of the well-being provided to children.

          •  I Will Never Ignore/Forget what My Mom Did (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Linda Wood

            Dad: blue collar union guy working in the factory. NO domestic skills, kept the cars going, mowed the grass- until I was old enough to do it.

            Mom: stay at home mom, doing everything on the home front, totally there for my brothers and I. we had our own garden. she canned tomatos and tomato juice (great for chili and pot roast in the crock pot over the winter!!)

            We picked apples in the fall, she canned apple sauce for the winter months.

            Heh- her grocery budget? $45 bucks per week! with this a family of five ate very well. steak and lobster? no-- but three good balanced meals a day.

            As you say, the value of this for a healthy family? Immeasureable.

            I miss her and her wisdom greatly.

            "I don't feel the change yet". Velma Hart

            by Superpole on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 11:01:48 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

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