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View Diary: Ancient Scotland: A Neolithic Site (47 comments)

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  •  As a person who specialized... (11+ / 0-)

    ... in ceramics / pottery in college (did an English major, Art History minor, honors program, started in on an Art degree before leaving college because I'd done ceramics and jewelry-making and other art courses in the summer), the form / function following each other likely holds true.  If the contents of the bowl/pot was some kind of slippery substance, horizontal lines or patterns would have helped hold the bowl steady.

    I worked with both stoneware and porcelain (high-fire clays - the low-fire clays are red-art and white earthenware), and while stoneware is the rougher clay, porcelain is baby-butt smooth.  One of the clays in the porcelain recipe is kaolin - the same stuff found in Kaopectate.  I quite fell in love with porcelain.  It's a very tactile, even sensual, clay to work with.  Because it's so smooth and the clays are so fine, it's difficult to make large pieces because the tendency for porcelain is to warp when it gets too high.  I look at photos of old Chinese or Japanese porcelain vases where the measurements are given that are so huge and wonder how the heck they made those large pieces.  They have my deepest admiration.

    I love pottery for one other reason.  Unless pieces I made are deliberately smashed to smithereens and ground up, they will survive me by thousands of years..., and I put my logo and the year I made my pieces on the bottom of each one.  Of all the ways to be immortal (passing on mtDNA included, since I'm female), permanent kinds of art that have gone through a high firing will endure (high-fire = 2400 degrees; low-fire = 1800 degrees).  Many years ago I gave a porcelain cup I made to a friend in a writer's group I belonged to.  His house caught fire, and the only thing that survived was the porcelain cup I made and gave him.  When all else disappears into dust, permanent forms of art (or functional pieces with or without decoration) will endure.  (As long as it's on non-acidic paper, writing will also endure, at least for a few centuries so that it can be reproduced....)

    Now you know an added reason I love Ojibwa's posts and the subject of ancient peoples and art and buildings.  I make the connections between the people of the past and the people of today through the artifacts and buildings they left behind....  I can imagine myself walking slowly or standing by the walls pictured above and running my hands over the stones, and wonder about the people who placed them....

    I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

    by NonnyO on Sun Oct 09, 2011 at 01:09:55 PM PDT

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    •  NonnyO your digital creations will also endure (8+ / 0-)

      Anyting beamed via satellite is out there... somewhere...

      The day is coming when a single carrot, freshly observed, will set off a revolution. Paul Cezanne

      by MeToo on Sun Oct 09, 2011 at 01:47:27 PM PDT

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      •  :-) Yes, thank you... (5+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mayim, Ojibwa, mama jo, ER Doc, FarWestGirl

        In order for anyone to know it was me, I'll have to admit to family and friends how much I've blogged..., and tell them what my blog name is.

        As far as digital art work, I've kept that offline, so I'm not sure that could be found.

        :-)

        I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

        by NonnyO on Sun Oct 09, 2011 at 02:03:38 PM PDT

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