Skip to main content

View Diary: Why OWS is more important than ever: Global Network of Capitalism Revealed by New Study (33 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  I'm glad you mentioned (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nulwee, aufklaerer, mkor7, ocular sinister
    Most of us older than 40 have known a capitalism subdued by a regulatory leash put in place after the Great Depression. So while we have been protected from its excesses, that protection has also denied us of the proper respect for its true, monstrous nature.  We are only now, thanks to the success of the political strategies of the right for the last decades, starting to glimpse that monster in the kind of untamed, pure capitalism that other countries have had to endure for years.

    The last part often goes unmentioned in left liberal circles when they're pining for "a new New Deal" or "a return to Keynesianism" or "sensible regulation."  The fact is that the good 'ol days of the 1950s and 1960s were built in large part on imperialist plunder and manipulation of what we used to call the Third World.  So when I hear left liberals talk about a return to Keynes, this is the context that always lurks in the back of my mind.  

    Was would a return to Keynes entail?  Narrow nationalism?  The usual American chauvinism?  Continued plundering of those we deem lesser?  The propping up of a dying capitalist-imperialist system?  

    We should reject all of this.  We should not save capitalism.  We should crush it.  Globally.  All it once.  With this current world conflagration being fanned by the internet, we have a chance to finally, once and for all, move from the pre-history of humanity to real history.

    To quote Dylan, "The winners now are soon to be last."  The 400 parasites that control more wealth than 150 million Americans and the millionaires and billionaires that control almost 40% of the world's wealth now are soon going to be made to learn the errors of their ways.

    To the barricades.  Prepare the global insurrection.  

    We should rid our ranks of all impotent thinking. All views that overestimate the strength of the enemy and underestimate the strength of the people are wrong. -- Mao Zedong

    by GiveNoQuarter on Thu Oct 20, 2011 at 12:03:54 AM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  Since you offer no alternative to some form (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Catte Nappe, kurt

      of capitalism in your call for global mayhem and anarchy, I'd have to say I'd rather have some kind of strong, effective leash on the 1%. And one way to do that might be to break up the transnational links between their corporate empires.

      The article in the New Scientist linked to in the diary suggested one possible, partial solution: heavy fees and monetary penalties/costs for transnational corporate linkages. Such penalties would also, I'd note, provide a strong disincentive to "imperialist plunder". If American or European corporations couldn't plunder the resources elsewhere the world without paying prohibitive fees and penalties, they'd  certainly be less inclined to do it.

      Of course that's one thing to propose and quite another to enforce such a penalty solution. The main enforcement arm and cheerleader of all this plundering, the U.S. military, is entirely formidable. Entirely dedicated to protecting the empire. And entirely capable of squashing armed insurrection like a bug. I wouldn't recommend it.

      "... the conspiracy theory label .... condemns as hysterical and pernicious almost all speculations about the possible complicity of political elites in suspicious events." Lance DeHaven-Smith, "Censored 2011"

      by tovan on Thu Oct 20, 2011 at 04:44:16 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  There can be no "return"; we need to (0+ / 0-)

      move forward thinking GLOBALLY, not just about the U.S. If it is good for all, it will be good for US.

      The fact is that the good 'ol days of the 1950s and 1960s were built in large part on imperialist plunder and manipulation of what we used to call the Third World.  So when I hear left liberals talk about a return to Keynes, this is the context that always lurks in the back of my mind.  

      Irrevocable commitment to any religion is not only intellectual suicide; it is positive unfaith because it closes the mind to any new vision of the world. - Alan Watts On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are

      by ocular sinister on Thu Oct 20, 2011 at 12:34:08 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site