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View Diary: Pique the Geek 20111030: Heat and Temperature (33 comments)

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  •  I'm sure that this diary involved mathmatics (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Translator, chimpy

    Which makes my eyes cross if I try to read it.

    I will ask a question tho: why is 55 degrees indoors in the winter time so much colder than 55 degrees outdoors during the same season? (Can you answer without math?:-)

    •  Most likely it has to do with (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      chimpy

      relative humidity.  Inside, the air is very dry because of the heater taking out the water vapor.  That makes your skin evaporate more water than usual.  Outside, the humidity is more like normal.

      I use a small humidifier in my bedroom in the cold months to make it more comfortable.  Look, Indy, no maths!

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      Les bonbons acceuillis, produisent leur effet, mais la liquer travaille plus vita cet effet.

      by Translator on Sun Oct 30, 2011 at 09:58:24 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Thanks Translator (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Translator

        That makes perfect sense. Never thought about a humidifier.

        •  Oh, not only does it make it feel warmer, (0+ / 0-)

          it keeps my nose from drying out when the relative humidity in my bedroom is around 60% with the humidifier running, and only around 25% with it not running.

          Warmest regards,

          Doc

          Les bonbons acceuillis, produisent leur effet, mais la liquer travaille plus vita cet effet.

          by Translator on Mon Oct 31, 2011 at 06:24:33 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  In our old house (0+ / 0-)

            we just put pots of water on the floor in front of the heater vents to add humidity to the air. When it seems especially dry and I'm home all day, I put a big pot of water on the stove, heat it until it is visibly steaming, and then turn the heat off. The house seems much more comfortable with a little humidity in the air.

    •  I'm guessing it's more physiology/psychology (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      chimpy, Translator

      than physics.

      outdoors in winter in, say, NYC you expect colder than 55. You dress for it, too. And you're probably not outdoors all day (with some exceptions).  And you are probably moving.  Indoors you expect it to be around 70.

      Founder Math and Statistics Geeks . Statistics for progressives

      by plf515 on Mon Oct 31, 2011 at 03:06:21 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  It might not all be physio/psycho-logy (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        plf515, Translator

        I visited a friend one who lived in San Diego, but away from the ocean. I left my state with my winter coat but thinking I wouldn't need it at her house.  It was achingly cold inside at 55 degrees; I had to wear my coat all the time and had to go outside to warm up. She, OTOH, used to these conditions, never noticed. I thought only SFO was "the coldest winter I ever spent was the summer I spent in San Francisco", not San Diego.

        •  Reply to both: (0+ / 0-)

          Some it is might indeed be psychological, and the wind speed also has to do with it.  But, in my house, specifically my bedroom (no jokes, please), I can keep the same 55 degrees F temperature and be cold even under my down comforter with the RH at 15% to 20% without the humidified running, and be comfortable under just the light comforter when it is running and the RH is around 60%.  These are just my personal observations, but are almost always the same.

          I am getting ready to get to RO water starting this weekend as it beginning to get cold here in the Bluegrass.

          Warmest regards,

          Doc

          Les bonbons acceuillis, produisent leur effet, mais la liquer travaille plus vita cet effet.

          by Translator on Mon Oct 31, 2011 at 06:29:18 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

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