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  •  Targets (6+ / 0-)
    it very specifically targets who is subject to said detention.

    And then says that the folks thus labeled as targets have no way to successfully argue that they are not members of the targeted group.

    That allows the administration (or subsequent administrations) arbitrary decisions about who is and who is not a terrorist (or al Quaeda or however the language reads after the House and Senate conference ended).

    50 states, 210 media market, 435 Congressional Districts, 3080 counties, 192,480 precincts

    by TarheelDem on Thu Dec 15, 2011 at 03:08:58 PM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  The bill specifically says that (0+ / 0-)

      it does not apply to U.S. Citizens or legal residents, and that is where most of the hysteria is coming from over this.

      Otherwise, it merely states what has been policy all along.  It also specifically says that it does not contravene existing laws.

      •  There is experience in this (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        midwesterner

        There is now a precedent in the President authorizing the assassination of a US citizen without warrant, due process, or review.  The public supposition is that since he was hunted and assassinated he was a member of al Quaeda in the Arabian Peninsula.  And that might be true, but it fails the Constitutional guarantees of the Fourth Amendment.

        It codifies a practice that has no checks and balances.

        Who is going to ensure that US citizens and legal residents have their rights protected if they are detained with access to an attorney?

        People are not being hysterical.  There is a recognition that we are well away down the slippery slope of not being a government of laws but a government in which people who protest can be arbitrarily arrested.  And people who break the law can avoid accountability if they have enough money.

        If you think this is being hysterical, you would have thought the folks who rebelled against King George III to have been over-the-top hysterical in their grievances.

        50 states, 210 media market, 435 Congressional Districts, 3080 counties, 192,480 precincts

        by TarheelDem on Thu Dec 15, 2011 at 04:59:34 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Er, bad example (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          SNFinVA

          While we're all acquainted with the propaganda version of the American Revolution, the truth is that it was primarily an anti-tax revolt instigated by wealthy people.  The revolutionaries certainly didn't respect the civil liberties of Tories, now did they?

          Yes, slippery slope arguments are hysterical, by their very nature.  And unsound.

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