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View Diary: Health Insurers Refuse to Rescind "Unreasonable" Rates; Snub Feds (250 comments)

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  •  I was responding to Cedwyn's comment, in which (6+ / 0-)

    he points out that health insurers will be under control when restrictions on entering the exchanges come into play.  I point out that two reasons why this makes no difference: (1) there are only private insurers in the exchanges (i.e., no public option) as you also point out; and (2) that the MLR requirements are basically meaningless, which is something Cedwyn seems to be pinning his hopes on.

    Is that clear enough?  If I still make no sense to you, I can't help you.

    The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. Bertrand Russell

    by accumbens on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 07:19:51 AM PST

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    •  i'm a she (4+ / 0-)

      and whether or not the exchanges contain only private insurers is non-responsive to my point.  companies acting in bad faith will be locked out of the exchanges.  that they're all private doesn't change that.

      some companies are already making changes to comply with the MLR requirements, so methinks you have a strange notion of "meaningless."

      My goal is to make the world safe for anarchy. - 4Freedom

      by Cedwyn on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 07:32:59 AM PST

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      •  Sorry about the gender mistake. As for your point (12+ / 0-)

        about companies acting in bad faith, I'd say in general what determines bad faith is in the eye of the beholder and not necessarily the law or regulations.  And, yes, I would agree that some companies are making changes to comply with the MLR, like WellPoint, which already ...

        has reclassified more than half a billion dollars in administrative expenses as medical spending to help meet the loss-ratio target.

        But that's only one insurer - the one with the biggest total enrollment.  Expect more of the same and other ways to game the system nobody has yet thought of.

        The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. Bertrand Russell

        by accumbens on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 07:39:38 AM PST

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      •  Just a reminder: (9+ / 0-)

        Price fixing.

        Remember, antitrust laws do not apply to health insurers.

        Like the ACA or not -- it is important to keep in mind that the legislation was largely written by the financial sector and health insurance companies. From their point of view, I think they did a wonderful job. Everytime the world turns, they always surprise me with an Easter Egg hidden in plain sight. Those guys are good.

        And, of course, you have to admire the pacing of the release. Letting largely healthy yound adults stay on their parents policies for a couple of years was a slam dunk for getting the progressives on board -- with negligible risk. It was so beautifully played.


        Most people, when knocked over by the truth, have a tendency to pick themselves up, brush themselves off...and then hurry away like nothing had ever happened.

        by Pluto on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:41:19 AM PST

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        •  Yes, the ability to keep kids on their parents' (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          George Hier, Dallasdoc, Mnemosyne

          plans longer was one of the crumbs tossed to the plebes while the insurers got the cake and the box it came in.  A shiny object it was.

          The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. Bertrand Russell

          by accumbens on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 11:50:31 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

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