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View Diary: You don't own me (267 comments)

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  •  Those exemptions aren't really relevant... (0+ / 0-)

    ...to the birth control debate, since the policy exempted the actual church from the birth control coverage mandate.  That's a reasonable accomodation of religious freedom, because if you're working in a church it's not unreasonable for the church to expect you to share their doctrine and beliefs.

    Applying your comments to the current debate, the suggestion here is that a Catholic church-owned hospital could expect the chaplains in that hospital to conform to church policies, but wouldn't have the same ability when it comes to nonsecular employees.  

    Political Compass: -6.75, -3.08

    by TexasTom on Sun Feb 19, 2012 at 11:53:09 AM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  Yes, they are relevant. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      VClib

      The original policy did not exempt institutions like schools and Catholic Charities.  And those institutions -- even hospitals -- can clearly have employees that are in "ministerial positions" as the SCOTUS defines it. So, those institutions have a constitutional right to be discriminatory with at least some of those employees, like pretty much ALL  the teachers in a Catholic school -- yet the original policy required them to pay for something that was against their religious beliefs for those religious employees.  

      Read that case I linked to.  The "ministerial exception" goes far, far beyond priests or ministers.  The employee in that case was a teacher who did a lot of secular stuff, but who agreed when she was hired that there was a religious component to her job.  That can apply to a whole lot of people in an institution like a religious school or a religious charity, both of which were not exempted under the original policy.  And even Catholic hospitals have employees other than chaplins who have a religious component to their job (although not as many) and those employees could well fit under that unanimous SCOTUS decision.  

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