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View Diary: The Religious Bigotry of Rick Santorum (209 comments)

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  •  We Anglicans haven't been "real" Christians to (13+ / 0-)

    some Roman Catholics for four and a half centuries - no surprise now.

    Is it true? Is it kind? Is it necessary? . . . and respect the dignity of every human being.

    by Wee Mama on Sat Feb 18, 2012 at 06:01:06 AM PST

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    •  Which is absurd (6+ / 0-)

      ..considering how close our churches still are.

      Back when I was working as a stage hand, one of the "shows" I worked was the election of a new bishop to head the southern Ohio Epicopalian diocese. They needed one on-deck hand to do some simple things with lights and sound, set up tables, find and plug in extension cords, watch for problems, etc., while their computer people handled graphics and music. So there I was onstage behind the graphics screen with about half a dozen of their staff.

      It was very much like being at Mass, with a break in the middle where the homily would normally be for voting. They had provided for a lunch break in case it took a lot of rounds, but it only took a few so they didn't take that. Before and after they were singing familiar hymns and praying familiar prayers, so I sang and prayed along with everyone else back stage. I didn't take communion, don't know what your church's rules are on that. but our common ground of belief and practice was obvious. Not that the differences don't matter, but they don't matter nearly as much as the heirarchy would have it.

      Cogito, ergo Democrata.

      by Ahianne on Sat Feb 18, 2012 at 10:02:30 AM PST

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      •  Indeed. You are generally open to take communion. (6+ / 0-)

        In almost all of TECs I have been in, people are welcomed. Some feel you must be baptized others do not care. But had you asked, I really believe you would have been welcomed. Gosh, we have a LOT of former RCs in our churches!

        202-224-3121 to Congress in D.C. USE it! You can tell how big a person is by what it takes to discourage them. "We're not perfect, but they're nuts."--Barney Frank 01/02/2012

        by cany on Sat Feb 18, 2012 at 10:32:01 AM PST

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        •  Surely TEC must have an official policy (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Ahianne, RunawayRose

          on whether someone who has not been baptized can take communion or not. I don't think something like that is up to individual church members to decide.

          As I recall, the policy of the American Lutheran church is that anyone who has been baptized in a church that accepts the Trinity can take communion.

          •  It's not church members, it is the Priest. (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Ahianne, Alexandre, Onomastic, RunawayRose

            Episcopalians aren't your run of the mill catholics. There are more opinions on any topic as members:)

            In my church (a low church) they routinely invite people to take part in the Eucharist without having to go through a drill or anything. You want it, you got it. Other priests don't have to do that... and many don't.

            I prefer high church, actually, but really love the parish I attend.

            202-224-3121 to Congress in D.C. USE it! You can tell how big a person is by what it takes to discourage them. "We're not perfect, but they're nuts."--Barney Frank 01/02/2012

            by cany on Sat Feb 18, 2012 at 12:08:57 PM PST

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          •  I should add... they don't even announce anything (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Ahianne, Alexandre, Onomastic, RunawayRose

            baptism or the Trinity.

            202-224-3121 to Congress in D.C. USE it! You can tell how big a person is by what it takes to discourage them. "We're not perfect, but they're nuts."--Barney Frank 01/02/2012

            by cany on Sat Feb 18, 2012 at 12:09:40 PM PST

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            •  Sorry: I wasn't clear (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              cany, RunawayRose

              What ELCA requires is that the church you were baptized in accepts the Trinity.

              Baptism and the Eucharist are about partaking of the Holy Spirit, not doctrine. So to me, the idea of giving communion to an unbaptized person sounds very weird. (I was raised Eastern Orthodox.)

              That reminds me: the reason some evangelicals don't consider mainline Christians, including Protestants, to be Christians is the practice of infant baptism. They think baptism is about making a conscious choice, something an infant obviously can't do. That's why they have the practice of getting baptized a second time, something which is heretical from a mainstream Christian point of view.

              There are all kinds of combinations of weird beliefs out there. Contemporary America is like the first few centuries of Christianity that way.

              •  That's what confirmation is for:) (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                RunawayRose

                I was confirmed at 50 and my mom was 90:)

                Think we thought about it long enough?  :)

                202-224-3121 to Congress in D.C. USE it! You can tell how big a person is by what it takes to discourage them. "We're not perfect, but they're nuts."--Barney Frank 01/02/2012

                by cany on Sat Feb 18, 2012 at 05:27:36 PM PST

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