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View Diary: DoJ Accuses Apple, E-Book Publishers of Price Fixing (26 comments)

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  •  If you can't afford $79 (the price for the ... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    phenry

    basic Kindle), I really question how many books you're going to be buying.  I suspect the reasons for the profile you mention are that these are the people who read the most books, rather that others don't have access to e-reading devices.

    Bin Laden is dead. GM and Chrysler are alive.

    by leevank on Sat Mar 10, 2012 at 02:02:12 PM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  Used books. (0+ / 0-)

      What a concept.

      Say, how do you get used e-books?

      •  How do used book sales help authors? (0+ / 0-)

        We were talking about why authors would oppose this antitrust action.

        Bin Laden is dead. GM and Chrysler are alive.

        by leevank on Sun Mar 11, 2012 at 07:16:36 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Of course we were. (0+ / 0-)

          Used books help authors tremendously, as it turns out - because it gets their name known.

          However, the actual question I was responding to there was:

          If you can't afford $79 (the price for the basic Kindle), I really question how many books you're going to be buying.
          On the other hand, your suspicion below is basically ridiculous:
          I suspect the reasons for the profile you mention are that these are the people who read the most books, rather that others don't have access to e-reading devices.
          The whole point was that what data there is right now shows that e-books are largely being bought by upper-income consumers.

          For someone who adds so much to the net worth of authors, your ability to follow a conversational thread is somewhat appalling.

      •  If anything, by lowering the price of new books .. (0+ / 0-)

        and thereby increasing the market for new books, e-readers should help authors.  

        When I buy a book, I'm interested in the author's ideas and language, not the cover, the ink, the paper, the cost of storing it in a warehouse and a book store, or the cost of shipping it from wherever it's printed and bound.  By eliminating the costs of all that stuff that I'm not really interested in buying, but am forced to buy with a physical book, it should be possible to both reduce the purchase price and increase the money that goes to the author.

        Bin Laden is dead. GM and Chrysler are alive.

        by leevank on Sun Mar 11, 2012 at 07:22:21 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  "Should be possible" (0+ / 0-)

          The link I gave illustrated that even if that is possible, it isn't what was happening.

          Furthermore, you are still focused on the idea that everyone can buy books (and find books) the way you do. Not to mention ignoring the concept of actual ownership of a good, rather than the renting of an arrangement of words.

          •  You're assuming a totally inelastic mkt for books (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            phenry

            I don't know what your evidence is that books, unlike almost all other optional purchases, don't have an elastic market -- that is, one where a reduction in prices causes an increase in sales.

            Bin Laden is dead. GM and Chrysler are alive.

            by leevank on Sun Mar 11, 2012 at 03:27:23 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

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