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View Diary: Trayvon Martin, White Denial and the Unacceptable Burden of Blackness in America (279 comments)

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  •  Louise, as a mom who has cried (2+ / 0-)
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    Louise, Imhotepsings

    over and over for Trayvon's parents, that thought was not anything but knowing the reality - which you thoroughly cover in your comments.

    As parents we all worry about the awful things that our kids may face, and might be horribly hurt or killed by. The logical thought that your brain came to was a realistic understanding that his probability of facing those race specific problems are low, because of the level of melanin in his skin.

    If you think about it, that is a powerful concept to bring out.
    Your son has AA genes, the color of that superficial layer of skin just doesn't reflect it the way another half white guy named Obama does.

    It makes a world of difference for you as a parent and him as a human being trying to grow up with a healthy sense of self esteem and confidence. When people really understand what those kids are faced with and how it has to hurt their chances of becoming the human they could be, they are more likely to speak out. The way LGBT kids are getting attention and support is another example of Americans getting that being treated as an outcast, unworthy, etc. is NOT how we want kids to grow up in our country.

    Take the energy you are spared from the worry and invest it in the fight. There but for the grace of genetics goes your son.

    "People, even more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed and redeemed; never throw out anyone. " Audrey Hepburn "A Beautiful Woman"

    by Ginny in CO on Thu Mar 22, 2012 at 07:35:01 PM PDT

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    •  Ginny, and don't I know it (2+ / 0-)
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      Ginny in CO, Imhotepsings

      "There but for the grace of genetics goes your son."
      Life is tough for his generation. No jobs, college costs either a lifetime of debt or out of reach, a sense of being unwanted by America unless you already have money...
      It's easy for him and his friends to lose hope and self-respect. He hasn't lost either, as far as I can tell.

      Of course I worry for him, his friends, and his age cohort. But it made me sad when I realized how glad I was that he wasn't able to be racially categorized when he attended high school ; students would come up to him in the halls, and try to guess his background: cafe au lait skin, straight nose with a slight flare, brown eyes, and dark curly hair.  He'd come home with a new guess each day "Are you Syrian?", "Are you Egyptian?", "Are you Spanish?", "Are you Greek?"  and on and on through the whole gamut of countries where the races have met and mingled for centuries. He would always smile, shake his head, and simply say, "No." My husband would smile, too, because we both knew, as Jake did, that "black folk" came in all shades.

      But this was the first time I was glad that he could "pass" because it upped his survival chances.

      Every viewing of that Trayvon's smiling face, and the sounds of his last cries for help before the shot, only drive the horror and the pain deeper. What is it that we can do?

      They say "cut back" - we say "fight back"!

      by Louise on Thu Mar 22, 2012 at 08:56:01 PM PDT

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      •  Yeah, my kids are 31 and 27 (3+ / 0-)
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        Louise, herbalina, Imhotepsings

        Trying to get degrees while working part time. Watching the other kids graduate and take jobs that only require the HS diploma or GED.

        Watching their dad and I get dropped from professional jobs as we got closer to retirement.

        Every viewing of that Trayvon's smiling face, and the sounds of his last cries for help before the shot, only drive the horror and the pain deeper. What is it that we can do?
        I couldn't watch any videos of the parents until a few hours ago.

        I've been thinking about all the things that are coming to a head this year telling us the kids are not alright. The LGBT kids getting bullied, the ones that have been sexually abused by priests, sports figures, parents and other kids, the ones that have been sent to those horrible residential schools for punishment of their unapproved behavior. Kids who are homeless, hungry, have no health care and no hope. The kids that watched the first black man become the president of the US and had a glimpse of self confidence and hope. And have gone back to living in fear of being gunned down in the cross fire of a drug war or a cop that shoots a black kid because he is so indoctrinated in the myths.

        And the insane determination to deny women the capacity to plan pregnancies so they are able, with a partner, to invest 18 years in rearing that baby.

        I think a lot of Americans are waking up to how much pain there is in our society for children. Going back to the fifties would not make it better, aside from being totally impossible.

        There are a lot of separate groups out there that are fighting these battles. I wonder if they are working together enough.  The economy, environment, health care, medicare, SS are all urgent. The kids are just as important if not more. They are the future - if they have childhoods that prepare them for it.

        The school reform issues also need to come into this battle. Maybe we can tie them altogether to GOTV.

        "People, even more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed and redeemed; never throw out anyone. " Audrey Hepburn "A Beautiful Woman"

        by Ginny in CO on Thu Mar 22, 2012 at 09:26:30 PM PDT

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