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View Diary: Happy Birthday John Holt – “Patron Saint” of Unschooling (93 comments)

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  •  I dug up a bit more. It was Neil Postman (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    xaxnar, angelajean

    who realized (from Wiki)

    ...that schools' primary social function is to create a common culture among citizens through the communication of unifying purpose-giving narratives rather than to simply initiate children into the economy.

    “The idea of public education depends absolutely on the existence of shared narratives and the exclusion of narratives that lead to alienation and divisiveness. What makes public schools public is not so much that the schools have common goals but that the students have common gods. The reason for this is that public education does not serve a public. It creates a public.” (pg. 17)

    Let's do that again...
    It creates a public.
    That is the concept I was recalling.

    This is from The End of Education - a most excellently ambiguous title - which I have not read, but I guess I will have to!

    "Maybe this is how empires die - their citizens just don't deserve to be world leaders anymore." -Kossack Puddytat, In a Comment 18 Sept 2011

    by pixxer on Sat Apr 14, 2012 at 10:56:51 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  Thanks for that passage... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      angelajean, FloridaSNMOM, pixxer

      I think of Horace Mann when I read it.   That was what he was thinking about when he built essentially the original basically religious curriculum for the "common" schools in Massachusetts.

      I understand the idea, though I think there is plenty of real life world and national drama (plus all the big "reality" shows on TV like American Idol, et al) that all or most of us share.  IMO we don't need to come up with more stuff like that to teach in schools.

      Cooper Zale Los Angeles http://www.leftyparent.com

      by leftyparent on Sat Apr 14, 2012 at 11:20:27 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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