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View Diary: A Saturday reflection as the school year heads to its conclusion (17 comments)

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  •  Do you think teaching will become this? Standards (1+ / 0-)
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    annetteboardman

    education is coming to Iowa. If it comes, I can see my job is going to be a facilitator of information to get students to be able to do the skills necessary to pass the standards.

    It would be a huge change to education, but I think the AP framework shows that it works.

    •  I can't address the issue of (0+ / 0-)

      standards education, but it sounds similar to the objective oriented model that was used when I taught remedial classes for the Army. I'm just a housewife now who homeschooled one of her two kids. I did like teacherken's idea of having the kids correct their errors. I used to do that with my kids. When they'd get upset over missing something I'd say, "Never let a good mistake go to waste!"
      I'd have them find out what they'd done wrong. In my son's case, since I homeschooled him, sometimes we'd take issue with an answer, and we'd make our own. I just think all of life is a learning experience and that experience doesn't end when you put down an answer on a test.

      "The object of persecution is persecution. The object of torture is torture. The object of power is power. Now do you begin to understand me?" ~Orwell, "1984"

      by Lily O Lady on Sat Apr 21, 2012 at 09:28:24 AM PDT

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      •  have told my students a story on myself (1+ / 0-)
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        annetteboardman

        during the music history comprehensive exam I took as a music major at Haverford in 1973, where the professor made her divide between two periods of history did not make sense to me.  So I moved it, explained why, explained why then none of the possible questions she offered for us to choose from and then answer now made sense, so made up my own questions for those two periods and answered them.

        There were five questions totally.

        I got a 98.

        I did not lose points on either of those two.

        However, I point out that I knew the professor, she knew my work and knowledge, and even should she give me 0 for those two questions the only impact it would have had on me was the difference as to what level of honors I would earn in my department.  Not advisable to do that on exams externally designed by people who not know you.

        "what the best and wisest parent wants for his child is what we should want for all the children of the community" - John Dewey

        by teacherken on Sat Apr 21, 2012 at 09:35:40 AM PDT

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    •  Standards have been used in Pony Club for (1+ / 0-)
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      boji

      many years. US Pony Club was modeled on a program in England.  

      The Standards of Proficiency are a sequential curriculum of both book/practical knowledge, and actual skills riding a horse.  There are 3 beginner levels 3 intermediate levels and 2 advanced levels, and now the addition of some specialty standards for specific disciplines eg. dressage, jumping.  

      Pony Club is designed to be an educational organization and meetings are to have an educational focus.  The instructors are told to "teach to the Standard."  Children move through the standards at their own pace, regardless of age.  They also volunteer for when they think they are ready for the standards assessment, although the instructors help guide them with feedback so they know if they are ready.  

      The actual assessments require 100% pass for every area on the exam, with a rating of Meets or Exceeds the Standard.  They can re-test within 2 weeks if they fail is specified number of sections or less.  Otherwise they have to wait at least a couple of months and get the recommendation of their instructors that they are ready.  The assessments are conducted by an instructor who has not been the one teaching the children, to help make the evaluation more objective.  

      There is a lot in this system that could be used in schools.  I like the notion of badges as used in Scouting too, and Pony Club recently added badges so kids could earn something when they were between levels on the Standards.

      I also see as a speech-language pathologist that I teach children all the time using authentic assessment, no grades, no restrictions on whether I could do something along the lines of the author's use of "old tests" to get baselines etc.  In fact, getting a baseline is pretty much required/standard procedure in therapy.  You baseline where the client is now, without cueing, or even baseline what they can do with different degrees of cueing.  Say they only need min cues for one thing but max cues for another.  On the latter, if they progress to min cues, that's progress.  The emphasis is on learning and facilitating progress, not grades or scores on tests.  Personally I think grades should be eliminated at least until high school.  And there is such misuse--I've seen situations where teaching is basically done by worksheet in the lower grades and every worksheet is graded.  So teaching comes to be basically testing the child all day with a few moments of explanation or some projects thrown in every now and then.  It makes no sense to me to grade every single effort of a 6 year old on reading and writing or math.  Feedback, yes.  Grades, no.  

      Which gets to one of the fundamental problems with typical schooling, which is use of grades instead of measures of progress towards something like Standards.  

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