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View Diary: House making changes to CISPA, but it's still too dangerous (33 comments)

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  •  Gonna be meeting Dutch this Fri (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    HistoryInAction, Brown Thrasher

    as part of a trip I organized for Baltimore County Young Democrats. And I was planning on bringing up CISPA. Rep. Ruppersberger will likely still push for CISPA though.

    Any suggestions for how he can improve the bill?

    •  Show him the WH Veto (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Tamar, Brown Thrasher

      It addresses most of the privacy concerns.

      The tech community is concerned that the bill will be ineffective. It should prevent 'bad' tactics like deep packet sniffing while encourage sharing of things like malicious binary packets (harmful code inserted into a system) or attack vectors (traces left behind after an attack) rather than allowing companies to share ALL the cyber things.

      •  haven't the slightest idea what you're talking (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        The Angry Architect

        about but I'll give you a rec for putting your knowledge to good use and for hoping you'll explain more!

        We're not perfect, but they're nuts! -- Barney Frank

        by Tamar on Wed Apr 25, 2012 at 01:47:21 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Ah, yes :) (3+ / 0-)

          CISPA staffers worry about saying here are the bad things the bad guys do, so any time a bad thing happens, tell us. This explicit mention of the bad things means that the bad guys just avoid them. Put a lock on the door; go through the window, that sort of thing.

          The tech world is saying that there are certain markers of bad things that aren't the bad things themselves that are much less likely to change as the bad guys adjust. That will allow the bill to be effective.

          The tech world doesn't want to be yelled at by DC for being told to do something ineffective and is confused why DC is asking them to collect a lot more, broader information after a few intense months of tech privacy scandals. Folks in this world are listening to their users, and are wondering why DC is going in the opposite direction to the public.

          •  so the real question is, why doesn't Congress (2+ / 0-)

            get serious tech people involved in writing the law?
            I assume that it's either ignorance, or purposeful stupidity. I've experienced (when I worked at a Hill advocacy group) the kind of "experts" sometimes called upon, usually by the Republicans. (e.g., on vaccination issues, their expert was a guy who had never done any research on vaccines, never done any research on government health programs, had no medical background, no public health background, and whose publications were limited to a thought piece that he wrote and then rewrote a couple of times so he could publish it in several different places. But he had a Ph.D. in something, so he was "Dr. Goldberg.")

            We're not perfect, but they're nuts! -- Barney Frank

            by Tamar on Wed Apr 25, 2012 at 02:01:11 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I think it's more the tech world's problem (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              The Angry Architect

              DC knows expertise, but the tech world keeps telling them to a) jump off a cliff and b) just leave us alone.

              When DC decides that b) isn't an option, the tech world doesn't revise a) leaving the bill to be drafted by folks not part of the tech culture that rejects DC.

            •  Willful blindness with malice aforethought (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              The Angry Architect

              ...is my estimate.

              The MPAA & RIAA lobbyists were chomping at the bit back in the winter to censor independent producers of film & music. Now, with CISPA, they get to declare them terrorists too.

              In other words, to Big Media, killing the Internet is not a bug of this bill, but a feature.

              Tell Congress: DON'T BREAK THE INTERNET! Fight CISPA! Stop Cyber Spying!

              by Brown Thrasher on Wed Apr 25, 2012 at 02:18:21 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Yes (3+ / 0-)

                The tech world's lack of participation allows Big Media to do this, as well as leading to fun situations like Feinstein's quote: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

                On the Senate side, Google doesn't even have the backing of one of its own Senator, Democrat Dianne Feinstein. When HuffPost asked Feinstein, a Protect IP co-sponsor, if it was difficult for her to navigate the bill with Silicon Valley and Hollywood on opposite sides, she responded: "I don't believe that they are. I thought we had reconciled the issues. The bill's been passed out of committee." The response seems incredible given the outcry from Silicon Valley, and Google in particular, but the complexity of the legislation has left many lawmakers vulnerable to K Street spin.
                We put up CISPA on Github to see what response we get as a crowdsourced alternative: https://github.com/...

                Reddit users did similar with their post-SOPA proposal: http://opennet.net/...

        •  See HistoryInAction's post below (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          The Angry Architect

          ...entitled White House issues veto threat.

          It contains a link to the latest White House memorandum on CISPA, the last paragraph of which explicitly states that the President will veto the bill in its current form.

          Tell Congress: DON'T BREAK THE INTERNET! Fight CISPA! Stop Cyber Spying!

          by Brown Thrasher on Wed Apr 25, 2012 at 02:00:46 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Would Sen. Wyden's OPEN ACT be better? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        The Angry Architect

        Heard it was also being worked on by members of the tech community, not just DC staffers.

    •  Take out the spying & ISP immunity garbage (3+ / 0-)

      & ask some real computer professionals — the ones who built the Internet — about what they need to solve their actual problems.

      That'd be my advice.

      Tell Congress: DON'T BREAK THE INTERNET! Fight CISPA! Stop Cyber Spying!

      by Brown Thrasher on Wed Apr 25, 2012 at 01:30:56 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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