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View Diary: Scottish Parliament laughs at Donald Trump (162 comments)

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  •  People COME To Scotland for Noise! (64+ / 0-)

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    Seriously I think they've got a millennium more experience in tourism than the Don. They've also got a lot of windmills onshore and off to study in Europe.

    Incidentally the 80's or 90's book The Millionaire Next Door analyzed ethnic backgrounds of Americans for ability to grow wealth per unit income and found Scottish Americans so far out in front they had no peer.

    Trump has done so poorly in business that he'd be richer today if he'd played golf his entire life and just stuck the inheritance into money market funds.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Wed Apr 25, 2012 at 01:13:24 PM PDT

    •  funny thing is, though, (9+ / 0-)

      that he has Scottish heritage on one side, but don't remember which.

      Contradiction is not a sign of falsity, nor is the lack of contradiction a sign of truth. -- Blaise Pascal

      by Mnemosyne on Wed Apr 25, 2012 at 01:17:20 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  A Millenium more experience in tourism? (11+ / 0-)

      Gooserock, those visitors to Scotland from Norway and Sweden in 1012 AD weren't strictly considered 'tourists' in the modern sense of the word. They also had a rather "hands-on" approach to their admiration of the local attractions.

      Crossroads PAC: The place where you sell your soul to the devil.

      by Calouste on Wed Apr 25, 2012 at 03:43:57 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  That's not noise! That's music! eom (2+ / 0-)
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      cantelow, JeffW

      Renewable energy brings national global security.     

      by Calamity Jean on Wed Apr 25, 2012 at 08:41:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Scottish bagpipes (1+ / 0-)
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        tommymet

        Actually sound pretty awful when compared to their Irish counterpart. But that's how it goes with just about anything Scottish.

        Nothing brings people together more than mutual hatred.

        by Hannibal on Wed Apr 25, 2012 at 09:50:59 PM PDT

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        •  Having had the opportunity to pay both (6+ / 0-)

          I find the uilleann ("Irish") pipes nasal and cloying, despite the obvious utility of their wider range.

          The trick with the great pipes (what most people mean by the "Scottish") is to get them custom tuned 3/4 of a semitone lower, back to close to concert A, about where they were back in the 18th century. This gives them a big, fat, robust sound missing from the modern pipe band chanter. The current band pitch (A = 477 Hz) is not kind on the instrument.

          I'm having fun with my new Gaita grillera, the highest-pitched Galician bagpipe (bottom note, same as the C# on the A-string on the violin, plus an octave in D-major above that), which is essentially identical to the bagpipe played in the Scottish lowlands from the mid 16th century through the 18th. The toy just arrived yesterday, and I'm just figuring out the tuning.

          Non enim propter gloriam, diuicias aut honores pugnamus set propter libertatem solummodo quam Nemo bonus nisi simul cum vita amittit. -Declaration of Arbroath

          by Robobagpiper on Thu Apr 26, 2012 at 03:26:48 AM PDT

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          •  Love the pipes. (1+ / 0-)
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            Robobagpiper

            Put up a youtube sometime.

            "There's a crack in everything; that's how the light gets in". Leonard Cohen

            by northsylvania on Thu Apr 26, 2012 at 10:59:50 AM PDT

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            •  Check out my screen name on YouTube (1+ / 0-)
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              northsylvania

              Some stuff of me there, also stuff of my trip to Cape Breton, NS last summer.

              Non enim propter gloriam, diuicias aut honores pugnamus set propter libertatem solummodo quam Nemo bonus nisi simul cum vita amittit. -Declaration of Arbroath

              by Robobagpiper on Thu Apr 26, 2012 at 11:05:58 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  They do work well with hard rock (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Robobagpiper

            Dropkick Murphys use them to good effect, though it's odd that a band that considers itself Irish uses Scottish bagpipes.

            Nothing brings people together more than mutual hatred.

            by Hannibal on Thu Apr 26, 2012 at 04:01:30 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  The "Scottish" bagpipes are more correctly a (0+ / 0-)

              pan-Gaelic instrument; they're not unique to the Scottish Highlands. The Gaelic term "an piob mhòr" simply means "the big bagpipes"; the "mh" is a "v" sound in Scottish Gaelic, but IIRC is, in this case, a "w" sound in Irish, possibly leading to the common but inaccurate term in Irish English, "war pipes".

              The instrument appeared in the Gaidhealtachd in around 1520 in a two-drone version, possibly brought in by Gaelic mercenaries who served in the low countries. They acquired a third drone by 1680 or so, and aesthetically began to take the modern form in 1780 or so; in both cases, first in Scotland, then Ireland following a little later.

              In the Scottish Gaidhealtachd, they gained prestige beyond their folk-dance origins by assuming much of the art music (ceol mòr) of the Gaelic aristocracy from the wire-strung harp (clàirseach), but in Ireland they remained a folk instrument.

              Both in Ireland and Scotland, the big pipes began to decline through the end of the 18th century, until they took on a new role in the Highland regiments through the 7 Years War onward, and the invention of the regimental and civilian bagpipe bands in the 19th.

              By 1800 in Ireland they began to lose out to the piob uilleann, which had twice the range and thus could play much more of the fiddle repertoire. The piob uilleann descended from the "pastoral bagpipe" of the mid-18th century, and while it had some currency in Scotland and Northumbria, never became a permanent addition to the musical line-up.

              There were attempts to "update" the big bagpipes for the Irish, with limited success, around 1900, with the introduction of the "Brian Boru Bagpipe"; this instrument featured, rather than 2 tenor drones and a bass drone in Bb, a tenor and bass in Bb, and a baritone drone in Eb between them, and keyed and fully-chromatic chanter that goes 2 notes above and 2 notes below the original 9-note chanter. As this new instrument required a new fingering, it never caught on in Scotland, though is played by some Irish pipe bands.

              So it's perfectly appropriate to hear, then, the "Scottish bagpipes" used in an Irish context; and not as inappropriate as one might think, thanks to the pastoral bagpipes connection, to hear the "Irish bagpipes" in a Scottish context.

              Non enim propter gloriam, diuicias aut honores pugnamus set propter libertatem solummodo quam Nemo bonus nisi simul cum vita amittit. -Declaration of Arbroath

              by Robobagpiper on Fri Apr 27, 2012 at 03:34:54 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Also, after WWII, the Celtic people of northern (0+ / 0-)

                France, the Bretons of Brittany, long having played their own indigenous bagpipes (binou kozh), adopted the Highland bagpipe, which played an octave lower, for their own pipe bands (bagad).

                Non enim propter gloriam, diuicias aut honores pugnamus set propter libertatem solummodo quam Nemo bonus nisi simul cum vita amittit. -Declaration of Arbroath

                by Robobagpiper on Fri Apr 27, 2012 at 03:36:41 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

        •  Disagree. (0+ / 0-)

          It just depends on what you're after.  The Irish pipes are more haunting and lyrical; the kind of thing you want to hear as you're looking out over a misty valley from a craggy cliff.  The Scottish pipes are much more stirring and primal; the kind of thing you want playing as you charge into battle with sword in hand.

          I know which I prefer, but I freely admit that it seems to be a hereditary thing; if you don't have some Scot in you, it's not surprising if you don't dig 'em.  Of course, just about every other people on the face of the planet got their butts kicked by the Scots at one time or another, so the aversion may also be the distant echoes of ancestral memory...  ;-D

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