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View Diary: Bill Maher says Romney's Mormon church donations are NOT charity (178 comments)

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  •  Rich Wingers like the guise of donating to charity (7+ / 0-)

    No surprise that Rmoney and the Koch brothers think alike ...

    Koch-Theater_Tea-Party_Guerilla-Action_01

    “The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have little.” ~ FDR

    by dmhlt 66 on Sat May 05, 2012 at 08:20:51 AM PDT

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    •  because they're giving our money not theirs (5+ / 0-)

      Rich folks love the "charity' deduction because they can use tax money to fund their favorite cause. They are not "giving" a dime of their own fortunes. They're redirecting government moneys to causes they like and support.

      The real issue is, when Mitt Romney gets a deduction for giving to charity, the rest of us taxpayers have to cover the loss.  Charitable deductions reduce the public coffers by about $60 billion dollars a year.  They take more out of our budget than enforcing the Buffett Rule would put back in.

      America could have chosen to be the worlds doctor, or grocer. We choose instead to be her policeman. pity

      by cacamp on Sat May 05, 2012 at 08:50:44 AM PDT

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      •  Deductions are not 100% (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ER Doc

        So your conclusion is wrong.

        If I am wrong about the 100%, someone please correct me.

      •  Actually, that's not how it works... (4+ / 0-)
        Rich folks love the "charity' deduction because they can use tax money to fund their favorite cause. They are not "giving" a dime of their own fortunes. They're redirecting government moneys to causes they like and support.
            Charitable gifts are subtracted from the giver's gross income, and therefore reduce the taxable income of the giver. Whatever "government moneys" go to those causes are the percentage of the giver's income that would have gone to taxes if the giver had not made the charitable contribution. So if the giver is in a 35% tax bracket, 35% of the gift would have gone to taxes if the gift hadn't been made. 65% of the gift comes from the money the giver would have kept; i.e., "their own fortunes."

        -7.25, -6.26

        We are men of action; lies do not become us.

        by ER Doc on Sat May 05, 2012 at 10:19:46 AM PDT

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        •  I thought it works like this... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ER Doc

          say a person owes $100 in taxes they can "give" a certain percentage of that to charity. I freely admit being too por to deduct shit so very well may be wrong.

          America could have chosen to be the worlds doctor, or grocer. We choose instead to be her policeman. pity

          by cacamp on Sat May 05, 2012 at 06:48:37 PM PDT

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          •  Tax deductions are subtracted from taxable income (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            cacamp

            before the tax is figured. That means that the reduction in a person's tax is the percentage of their highest tax bracket, since it would have come from that highest percentage. The standard deduction for a single person is $5,700, so if you have less than $5,700 in deductions as a single person, it's better not to itemize your deductions and just take the standard deduction, but wealthy people virtually always have more, so they itemize deductions. For a married couple filing jointly, the standard deduction is $11,400.
                 When you itemize, the charitable contrbutions are added to the various other deductions such as mortgage interest, business expenses, etc., and that amount is subtracted from the income before the tax is figured.
                 For people married filing jointly, the tax brackets are as follows:
            The first $0 – $17,400 are taxed at 10%.
            The next $17,401 – $70,700 are taxed at 15%.
            The next $70,701 – $142,700 are taxed at 25%.  
            The next $142,701 – $217,450 are taxed at 28%.  
            The next $217,451 – $388,350 are taxed at 33%.  
            And everything over $388,350 is taxed at 35%.
                 So, for a wealthy person with total income over $388,350 after all the deductions are taken, the deductions all save 35% in taxes. That still means that whatever a wealthy person contributes to charity, 65% of it would still have been their money if they hadn't donated it.
                 These deductions still save more money for the very wealthy than others, since their top tax rate is higher. For someone like me for example, even though I make a lot of money relatively speaking, my top tax rate is 28%, so my charitable contributions represent 28% tax money and 72% my money.

            -7.25, -6.26

            We are men of action; lies do not become us.

            by ER Doc on Sun May 06, 2012 at 01:40:01 AM PDT

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