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View Diary: Vanity Fair Must-Read: “The 1 Percent’s Problem,” by Joseph Stiglitz (222 comments)

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  •  "My Childhood Chums?" (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bigjacbigjacbigjac, Tom Taaffe

    One is a Jesuit priest.  

    I wonder what we could discuss today if I should meet him.

    His younger brother, from a huge, hungry, poverty-stricken  Irish family, was often in trouble with the cops but later became a supermarket tycoon - I would guess quite honestly.  Pat spent his after school hours working in a grocery store.

    Want to hear about one family that had a son that became an executive with an executive wife and one daughter that died in her 20's from drugs and depravity and another that seldom knew who she would be sleeping with or whether she would be sleeping under a bridge?

    Want to know about an inland empire that  took out the mismanagers of Oregon by eliminating the governor, lt. governor and attorney general?  The royalty at the MC in Warner Valley demanded their presence at the MC's ranch.  The plane crashed before arriving at the MC's private airport and killed not only the three Republicans but much of the future for the party in Oregon.  One of my classmates went from being an heiress to a department store clerk when the MC went bankrupt.

    Need I go on?

    Best,  Terry

    •  Exactly (0+ / 0-)

      the most successful of my childhood chums make around 100,000. Most are struggling to get by. Many are in deep economic trouble.

      And the only one who ever even got asked to run for any office was me.  And that offer came from an ex-girlfriend's dad (though he didn't know that). But the problem with that offer was I knew the bastard had fucked his daughter when she was twelve.  

      So that offer looked like the devil himself made it. I wanted to clock the guy. I still do..........

      What a creepy, miserable world we make when we let the worst scum in the country run our lives.

      •  Do We? (0+ / 0-)
        What a creepy, miserable world we make when we let the worst scum in the country run our lives.
        It doesn't appear to me that either of us does that.

        Just some difference of viewpoint but not fundamental beliefs from all I can tell.

        I didn't really know the older brother of the girl that grew up going from a potential heiress of vast wealth to a department store clerk but I was startled one day to hear an older brother being interviewed on his book, Hole in the Sky by William Kittredge.

        Bill is obviously capable of surmounting all manner of misfortune.  He was a sickly youth who spent much of his youth in hospitals with his very survival in question.  Grew up to be a real life cowboy and eventually a professor of literature at the University of Montana.  His books of fiction were not only less fictitious than most any given documentary but brutally honest, sparing neither himself nor a family that reigned over a vast desert empire and eventually went to ruin like a Tennessee Williams play.

        Of course, we are deeply affected by good and bad leaders and can be destroyed by the them but we can still be true to ourselves.  In any event we all end the same.

        Again thank you for being an honest, clear clarion of truth.  
        There are so  few.

        A little humor if I may.  My older sister was really upset to learn the fights that occurred at the Grange with car headlights used to spotlight the action were over draft dodging.  She thought they were over girls.

        Best,  Terry

        •  Same here (0+ / 0-)

          I long ago decided, I'd rather go down for telling the truth than shut up and become a collaborator in the oppression of others, even if only by my silence.

          As my father put it, the measure of a person is their ability to stand up for others, when no one else will.

          And humor! It is the last refuge of the condemned and the first step toward stripping the powerful of their authority and credibility.  Sometimes the best tactic for tackling the miserably powerful is mockery, ridicule and laughter.

          Thanks for the little slices of life. You have a poetic hand with writing.  I love "sparing neither himself nor a family that reigned over a vast desert empire and eventually went to ruin like a Tennessee Williams play."

          Nice.

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