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View Diary: Sun's Effect on Ocean/Wind Circulation (36 comments)

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  •  okay, give me links to what it is .... (2+ / 0-)
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    jim in IA, jfromga

    you're referring to.  Is it about a particular wavelength of solar insolation that changes the environment?  300 nm is ultraviolet, and constitutes about % of the solar spectrum?

    Is what you are referring to from peer-reviewed research?  And do you have a particular axe to grind, perchance?

    Out of curiosity, I decided to do a bit of Googling on this topic.  I note that there has been knowledge of the stronger variations in solar insolation in the 200-300 nm range since about 1990 or so, perhaps further back.  In 1995, Lean et al. found that 0.51°C of the increase in temperature from the Maunder Minimum (late 1600s) to today is accounted for by solar insolation increases, and they state that's essentially in agreement with the climate model response. One-half of warming from 1860 to 1970 can be accounted for by solar insolation. But only 1/3 of the increase since 1970 to 1990 can account for the warming during that time.

    There's one other problem with UV light.  A pretty large proportion of it is absorbed in the stratosphere by ozone.  Impacts nearer the surface are related more to the visible and near-infrared part of the solar spectrum.

    "Mitt Romney has more positions than the Kama Sutra." -- me "Social justice is love, made public." -- Cornel West

    by billlaurelMD on Wed Jun 27, 2012 at 09:06:46 AM PDT

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    •  I didn't put in the % (0+ / 0-)

      but it's not all that much.  Looks like from Google links that it ranges from 2-3% of total solar irradiance.

      "Mitt Romney has more positions than the Kama Sutra." -- me "Social justice is love, made public." -- Cornel West

      by billlaurelMD on Wed Jun 27, 2012 at 09:41:05 AM PDT

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