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  •  Danish & Norwegian have a lilting, melodic quality (2+ / 0-)
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    NonnyO, raster44

    … that I find really appealing. To my (untrained in Scandinavian) ear it sounds a bit like the tones the Chinese family of spoken languages have.

    The Dutch kids' chorus Kinderen voor Kinderen wishes all the world's children freedom from hunger, ignorance, and war.

    by lotlizard on Tue Jul 10, 2012 at 10:24:30 AM PDT

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    •  Sounds like love to me.... (2+ / 0-)
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      lotlizard, raster44

      I'd say the Scandinavian brogues/accents (and Icelandic and Faroese) are softer, less nasal, not as high pitched or choppy as any of the Oriental accents, mostly because Scandinavian words are spoken from back in one's throat or from the back of the mouth and not up in the nasal cavities.  To me the sound of the Scandinavian accents is very musical and rhythmic..., not unlike waves lapping on the shore or against the hull of a Viking ship.... ;-)

      I grew up in a farming community where the vast majority of people were offspring of Norwegian, Swedish, and Danish immigrants, as were my parents and neighbors.  (I've done enough genealogy research on some of the side lineages that married into my family that I know where the neighbors came from because of where the farm names that became surnames came from; sometimes even the patronyms are found in single regions.  People from various communities in the old country tended to settle in clusters near relatives and/or friends from the old country.)  They all had a Scandinavian brogue - and I had one, too, until I moved away and lost it.

      I pick up accents unconsciously, and instantly.  Living around people who had no accent, I soon spoke without one and couldn't even imitate the brogue/accent sound until after I started taking Norwegian and could shape my mouth like a person in Norway (or Sweden or Denmark) does.  Only then could I do the brogue again.  Now I can even fall into it unconsciously, especially if I'm speaking with my brother on the phone.

      Since everyone who loved me sounded like that when I was a child, the sound of the Scandinavian accents sound like love to me.

      Go to the text-to-speech site and put this into the text box:  Jeg elsker deg.  [Norwegian for 'I love you.'  Elsker means love in all three languages.]

      :-)

      I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

      by NonnyO on Tue Jul 10, 2012 at 10:44:33 AM PDT

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      •  Yay! Languages that carry "aural pheromones"! ;o) (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        NonnyO, raster44

        Just listening to them being spoken raises one's oxytocin production.

        The Dutch kids' chorus Kinderen voor Kinderen wishes all the world's children freedom from hunger, ignorance, and war.

        by lotlizard on Tue Jul 10, 2012 at 11:03:57 AM PDT

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      •  Like written English, written Dansk/Norsk/Svensk (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        NonnyO, raster44

        … seems to follow spelling conventions (orthography) that matched the pronunciation a few hundred years ago, but now — at least for one just learning the language — seems riddled with inconsistencies and "don't worry about why, for now just accept that that's the way it is" cases.

        The Dutch kids' chorus Kinderen voor Kinderen wishes all the world's children freedom from hunger, ignorance, and war.

        by lotlizard on Tue Jul 10, 2012 at 11:13:14 AM PDT

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        •  Just be glad there's consistent spelling! (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          raster44, lotlizard

          :-D  Norway didn't have their first dictionary with standardized spelling until ca 1917.

          A hundred years ago and earlier, spellings were phonetic and regional, and all depended on the whims and educational background of the person writing the records.

          Uff da!  You have no idea how many ways words can be spelled, how many interchangeable letters there are, until you start to do genealogy research in old church records.

          Oh..., and the thing that would drive reichwingnuts totally batty is that the early writers of those records did, in fact, use X as an abbreviation for Christ/Krist [Xoffer, Xopher, Xina, Xian, etc].  If I'm working with transcribed records and can't get a hit the normal way ('starts with' option starting with ch or k on the search engine), I try X and get a hit.  'War on Christ' would be the hue and cry from modern fanatics against writers who lived three or four hundred years ago if they had a glance at those old records!  Knowing the scribes of old did use X for an abbreviation, I do use Xmas to imitate those old fellows.  ;-)  Yes.  I know that's passive-aggressive behavior done to piss off the twitchy twitches, but if they hadn't acted like morons in the first place, I never would have thought to do such a thing deliberately....  [Take a chill pill fanatics.  Life's too short to get so upset over trivialities.  Much ado about nothing will give you a stroke or a heart attack.  Save it for something important.]

          Actually, there are a lot of abbreviations in old records, but that's an entirely different topic that could lead to long explanations I'm too tired to write just now.  :-)  I desperately need a nap.

          I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

          by NonnyO on Tue Jul 10, 2012 at 11:32:41 AM PDT

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