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View Diary: Korean Nuclear Arrests Over Bribes (18 comments)

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  •  Doesn't mean it actually happened (0+ / 0-)

    IEA stats show 37% for 2005, and similar for 2004 and 2006.

    The WNA 44.7% stat for 2005 shows a surprising one-off 20% increase compared to the 38% from nuclear in the years immediately before and after, but doesn't show raw generation amounts to back that up. It strains logic that a nation with a fairly consistent high capacity factor in its operating nuclear plants would have a single-year 20% spike in its proportion of electricity obtained from that source. It would have required a few new reactors to suddenly appear, operate for one year, then mysteriously vanish.

    I also don't think 2005 is very applicable to what the diarist claimed as present tense. Their proportion from nuclear has declined quite a bit in the years since then.

    •  So, the Koreans via the (0+ / 0-)

      http://www.kaif.or.kr/... say nuclear provides 40% of the ROK's power. [Korean Atomic Industrial Forum]

      The 60% goal is was stated by Hee-Yong Le, Senior Vice-President at South Korea Electric Power Corporation (Kepco) at: http://gulfnews.com/...  as to whether that be capacity or actual capacity factor obviously is questionable. This is for 2030.

      David

      Dr. Isaac Asimov: "The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny ...'"

      by davidwalters on Fri Jul 13, 2012 at 09:20:00 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  There was indeed a time that was true (0+ / 0-)

        As pointed out, it was around 2000. Not even close today.

        You realise that just because a nuclear advocacy group reports or repeats an undated unsourced statistical claim, it isn't necessarily true, right?

        Here's two sources with different methodologies providing actual generation numbers that show it's false. Latest BP statistical review of world energy: 2011 gross generation was 150 TWh nuclear, 520 TWh total, that's 29% from nuclear. Latest IEA monthly electricity statistics as I cited above, 2011 net generation, 143 TWh nuclear and 498 TWh total, also makes 29%.

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