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View Diary: Common Core State Standards – Are Dangerous (133 comments)

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  •  Speaking as a parent of primary school students (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Linda Wood

    I really like standardized testing. It shows how well my kids match up against other kids their age in the US, it also shows me how well my school matches up.

    Until my kids actually attended school I'd no idea that simple things like reading and arithmetic were no longer being taught. When they stopped teaching the very basics of what is needed for an education something got off the tracks. I compare it to what is taught in the other place I've seen schools, a third world country with maybe a couple dollars per year spent per student and teachers with only a secondary education. At least there teachers know that teaching kids to read and write, add and subtract is a big deal. I blame school of ed.

    Our public education system is broken.

    The theory that nature is permanently in balance has been largely discredited

    by ban nock on Thu Jul 19, 2012 at 07:06:14 AM PDT

    •  I can't imagine your scenario-- (4+ / 0-)

      Most primary schools in the U.S. only teach reading and math (especially at early elementary) and ignore science, social studies, the arts, etc.  

      That is because of incoherent policy decisions that have not been revised even as flaws have become very apparent.  Public schools are bound by the law -- NCLB -- which has yet to be reauthorized.

      "At least there teachers know that teaching kids to read and write, add and subtract is a big deal. I blame school of ed."

      This is completely disconnected from reality.  Yes, schools of education are part of the blame, but hardly the only factor.  Second, stating that U.S. teachers do not know that teaching kids to read and write, add and subtract is important is complete bullshit.

      •  bruns, I have recommended (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        AkaEnragedGoddess, IamGumby

        of your comments to this diary with sincere thanks for your clarity and with agreement with your position.

        But I truly support what ban nock says here:

        Until my kids actually attended school I'd no idea that simple things like reading and arithmetic were no longer being taught. When they stopped teaching the very basics of what is needed for an education something got off the tracks.
        I think your remark in response,
        Most primary schools in the U.S. only teach reading and math (especially at early elementary) and ignore science, social studies, the arts, etc.
        may be an exaggeration, but if there is a recent emphasis on basic reading and math skills, it comes from a long period of problems confronting students, parents, and teachers, leading to cries for improved instruction in these areas.

        You mentioned something that may be in agreement:

        ... our current standards are overburdened with fragmented concepts.  We "cover" more content than almost any other country and rarely get into depth at any grade level.  This overburdened curriculum leads to one of the biggest complaints I hear when teachers try to do higher-level inquiry /problem solving / project-based learning -- No TIME to do extended work while still covering everything in the curriculum.
        I bolded the part of your comment that reminded me of the words of a university calculus instructor who has taken part in the development of the Common Core math standards. In recent decades significant numbers of his incoming students needed not only remedial math instruction, but also remedial reading and writing instruction in order to take part in his freshman courses. He and his colleagues had spent enormous time trying to bring their students to the level of knowledge and skill considered basic in previous decades, and that is why he became active in public school curriculum development.
        •  thanks for the recs & I agree with your comments- (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          AkaEnragedGoddess

          My comment about elementary is based on anecdotal evidence (and some published research) from a variety of states.  I shouldn't have said "only" -- instead, I should have said that increased attention to reading and math over the past decade has squeezed out time for other subject areas.

          •  I imagine you're right, and I understand (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            bruns, AkaEnragedGoddess

            that the time spent on reading and math is a contentious issue along with actual methods of instruction.

            I also understood you to mean that covering lots of subject matter lightly makes it very difficult to cover anything in depth, which is not the same as saying time spent at the university level teaching basic reading and math eliminates time for calculus.

            But I think we both see the importance of methods of instruction. For me, the primary classroom level is crucial in its preparation for everything else.

            •  I think the need for remedial courses in (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Linda Wood

              universities is driven by two factors (probably more).

              1.  We are admitting more students to colleges than in the past...not all are high achieving.

              2.  Good research (Sadler, Harvard) has shown that students that cover at least one topic in depth (at least a month) in high school are much more likely to be successful in college science courses than students that have not (only survey courses).  Our current overburdened curriculum could very well be the reason why students generally do not retain the knowledge and skills that they learn in school....they don't really "learn" it, it is just covered.

      •  they might teach it but they don't teach it in (0+ / 0-)

        such a way that kids learn it. I seem to remember being taught to read without all the razmataz. We had multiplication tables to memorize and we did. Many kids here are below grade level.

        We send our kids to public schools, but we now realize that it's up to us to teach them to read, write, and do basic math. What of the kids who don't have parents like us or whose parents don't even know they are expected to be the ones to teach their kids?

        How big is your personal carbon footprint?

        by ban nock on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 04:39:25 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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