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View Diary: Anti-Capitalist Meet-Up: Mitt And His Fellow Vulture Capitalists See Venezuela As a Threat: It Is. (156 comments)

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  •  As I said in another comment. I support the (64+ / 0-)

    Bolivarian Revolution.

    The “Bolivarian Revolution” refers to a leftist social movement and political process in Venezuela led by Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez, the founder of the Fifth Republic Movement (replaced by the United Socialist Party of Venezuela in 2007). The "Bolivarian Revolution" is named after Simón Bolívar, an early 19th century Venezuelan and Latin American revolutionary leader, prominent in the Spanish American wars of independence in achieving the independence of most of northern Latin America from Spanish rule. According to Chávez and other supporters, the "Bolivarian Revolution" seeks to build a mass movement to implement Bolivarianism - popular democracy, economic independence, equitable distribution of revenues, and an end to political corruption - in Venezuela. They interpret Bolívar's ideas from a socialist perspective.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/.
    The attacks on Chavez as an opponent of democracy and are by propagandists and oligarchs.
    As Tariq Ali notes:
    Some foreign correspondents in Caracas have convinced themselves that Chavez is an oppressive caudillo and they are desperate to translate their own fantasies into reality.. They provide no evidence of political prisoners, leave alone Guantanamo-style detentions or the removal of TV executives and newspaper editors (which happened without too much of a fuss in Blair’s Britain).
    http://www.counterpunch.org/....
    Furthermore,
    Chavez’ aims are regarded as revolutionary, even though the measures proposed are no different to those of the post-war Attlee government in Britain. Some of the oil-wealth is being spent to educate and heal the poor.
    Just under a million children from the shanty-towns and the poorest villages now obtain a free education; 1.2 million illiterate adults have been taught to read and write; secondary education has been made available to 250,000 children whose social status excluded them from this privilege during the ancien regime; three new university campuses were functioning by 2003 and six more are due to be completed by 2006.
    So of course Romney and all oligarchs and plutocrats for that matter will be afraid.
    •  Thanks for Your Excellent Comment and Quotes. (32+ / 0-)

      Your comment is very helpful in putting Chavez and the Bolivarian Revolution in its proper perspective.  Thanks for adding important points to this diary!

      Convict Bush, Cheney and their torture cabal. Support universal health care,unions, WikiLeaks and Occupy Wall Street! Time for a totally new, democratic economic system. Turn the corporations into worker cooperatives!

      by Justina on Sun Jul 22, 2012 at 03:29:33 PM PDT

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    •  From Romney, it's the usual shit smear. (15+ / 0-)

      Fact-free mischaracterizations of the President as naive (while Romney, by implied contrast, is a fount of fucking wisdom) and out of touch (again, by contrast, Romney is totally plugged in to the vox populi. No irony there!).

      American Exceptionalism: 10 percent of the people have 74.5 percent of the wealth.

      by psnyder on Sun Jul 22, 2012 at 06:29:23 PM PDT

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    •  as a leftist (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JohnnySacks

      I don't have too many problems with the use of oil wealth to help the poor.

      However, I do have a major problem with leaders changing electoral rules mid-term to their own benefit and subsequently indicating that they hope to rule for decades.

      That latter link is to the Guardian, not exactly a right-wing rag. Here's more from them:

      Voters had narrowly rejected a referendum to abolish presidential term limits in December 2007.

      Chávez learned lessons from that defeat, this time widening the terms of the referendum to allow mayors and governors to run indefinitely, giving them an incentive to mobilise support.

      The government's "red machine" waged a formidable campaign. Posters urging a "yes" vote saturated the country, state TV networks cheered for the "si" and civil servants were sent out to canvass.

      A flyer gave 10 reasons for voting yes. Number one said: "Chávez loves us and love is repaid with love", and the second stated: "Chávez is incapable of doing us harm".

      The opposition, a fragmented coalition of small political parties and university students, accepted defeat but complained that the government had hijacked state resources and hobbled the "no" campaign.

      "There was an abuse of power," David Smolanksy, a student leader, said.

      If you can't do it without sketchy autocratic maneuvers, then maybe you're doing leftism wrong...

      "You try to vote or participate in the government/ and the muh'fuckin' Democrats is actin' like Republicans" ~ Kweli -8.00, -6.56

      by joey c on Mon Jul 23, 2012 at 10:32:31 AM PDT

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      •  Your Facts Are a Bit Screwy. (0+ / 0-)

        Check your source. There were 69 different propositions on the 2007 referendum, which caused a great deal of confusion, as a voter might agree with one thing and disagree with others.  It was a very poorly designed referendum.  Preident Chavez originally proposed 33 articles, the National Assembly added the rest, and confusion reigned.

        In fact, Chavez lost this referendum, by less than 2 % of the votes.  Rather than demand a recount, Chavez immediately recognized the election results, congratulated the opposition on their victory and accepted his loss.

        For more, see http://en.wikipedia.org/...

        (So much for allegations about him being a dictator!)

        Convict Bush, Cheney and their torture cabal. Support universal health care,unions, WikiLeaks and Occupy Wall Street! Time for a totally new, democratic economic system. Turn the corporations into worker cooperatives!

        by Justina on Mon Jul 23, 2012 at 12:18:16 PM PDT

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        •  right back at you: 2009 referendum (0+ / 0-)

          I can't believe you posted that comment. It clearly indicates that you did not refer to the links I posted and that you misread my comment.

          The links I posted and the excerpt I included were about how Mr. Chavez learned from his 2007 referendum defeat and went on to call for and win a 2009 referendum that eliminated term limits.  

          So for you to tell me about the details of the 2007 referendum that he lost completely misses the point.

          I also never said he was a dictator, but I do think that if you get elected President and the rules when you are elected say "Presidents can only serve two terms" and then you work to overturn that rule for your own benefit, that is not the action of a democratic leader. Michael Bloomberg did the same thing I NYC and I fought bitterly against it.

          "You try to vote or participate in the government/ and the muh'fuckin' Democrats is actin' like Republicans" ~ Kweli -8.00, -6.56

          by joey c on Mon Jul 23, 2012 at 01:11:33 PM PDT

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          •  My Apologies, I Mis-Read Your Post. (0+ / 0-)

            I was obviously reading too quickly and assumed you were referring to the 2007 referendum rather than the 2009 one.  I stand corrected.

            But lets look at the question of national referendums, which Chavez's socialist party asked the nation to include in their 1999 Constitution.

            Wouldn't it be nice of the U.S. had national referendums to vote on such questions as marriage equality and decriminalization of marijuana, to say nothing about going to war in Iraq, governmental surveillance and prosecuting the criminal banksters.  Oh, and what about voting to change the law to  allow students to declare bankruptcy on their student loans!

            (Here in Venezuela, university students don't need loans, its free and they all get stipends to attend.)

            The U.S. did fine without term limits until FDR keep getting re-elected.  The Republicans panicked at that, and introduced term limits in the 1950's.  Democracy doesn't rise or fall on the question of term limits, especially when they are subject to a vote by national referendum.

            Convict Bush, Cheney and their torture cabal. Support universal health care,unions, WikiLeaks and Occupy Wall Street! Time for a totally new, democratic economic system. Turn the corporations into worker cooperatives!

            by Justina on Mon Jul 23, 2012 at 01:46:47 PM PDT

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            •  you make valid points, but... (0+ / 0-)

              I would not argue against the referendum process, necessarily, but it also allows for tyranny of the majority. If we had referendums, the Christian majority might enact scripture-based rules, or a majority of bigots could otherwise repress a vulnerable minority.

              I am similarly not certain whether term limits are a good or bad idea. What I am certain of is that anyone seeking to change a term limit law while in office should first make it a condition of the change in law that it does not benefit them personally. When Bloomberg extended term limits in NYC, I would have been fine with it if he had made the law so that for everyone elected in the future the maximum number of terms was 3, but for him and the other already-serving officials the rules would remain the same as those under which they were elected.

              By the same token, if Chavez thought that term limits should not exist for the good of Venezuela in general, fine, he should try to get rid of them. But when his own personal power is at stake (i.e. if term limits aren't removed, he has to step down) then he loses any claim to be acting for the benefit of his constituents and clearly is only seeking to extend his own power.

              "You try to vote or participate in the government/ and the muh'fuckin' Democrats is actin' like Republicans" ~ Kweli -8.00, -6.56

              by joey c on Mon Jul 23, 2012 at 01:55:28 PM PDT

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              •  This doesn't follow (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Justina
                But when his own personal power is at stake (i.e. if term limits aren't removed, he has to step down) then he loses any claim to be acting for the benefit of his constituents and clearly is only seeking to extend his own power.
                By this logic anyone who ran for re-election, or who ran for election in the first place, could be condemned for seeking personal power.

                Public good and political advantage aren't mutually exclusive. If they were, representative government would be an impossibility.

                Btw, your argument assumes that Chavez was certain to be re-elected. If such were the will of Venezuelan people, how could thwarting them be justified in the name of democracy?

                Nothing human is alien to me.

                by WB Reeves on Mon Jul 23, 2012 at 04:32:04 PM PDT

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      •  Not My Favorite Guy... But... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Shawn Russell, WB Reeves, Justina

        Took a lesson well learned from the economic terrorist treatment of Chile's Allende.  Chavez might not be an ideal leader (who is?), but the question revolves around Venezuela being better off with Chavez, or being under the US's thumb as some corporate bitch puppet.

    •  mmmm-kay (0+ / 0-)

      These have been reported for many many years, and the impacts of the Chavez regime on the state apparatus and media is very well documented....

      but yep, it's a conspiracy of the foreign media.

      Let me guess, Cuba and North Korea are glorious workers' paradises that are unfairly slandered too?

      (if you want to support a leftist regime with actual decent democratic credentials, you might have gone for Pres. Da Silva instead.)

      Courtesy Kos. Trying to call on the better angels of our nature.

      by Mindful Nature on Mon Jul 23, 2012 at 04:37:26 PM PDT

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