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View Diary: How Homeschooling Saved a Visual Spatial Learner (35 comments)

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  •  And I am saying this as a Special Ed Teacher (4+ / 0-)
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    angelajean, smalakoff, weck, gramofsam1

    Who didn't have a damn clue how to teach a visual learner.  How many others, who are supposed to KNOW, know little or nothing about how kids learn.

    If you starve the middle class, whose gonna pay for your crap?

    by rosabw on Sat Jul 28, 2012 at 08:50:52 AM PDT

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    •  If the teachers don't speak out, (2+ / 0-)
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      rosabw, weck

      the system will never change. I'm glad that you get it.

      Do you have any suggestions for how the system can better adapt to teaching visual spatial learners? Especially 'delayed' readers.

      •  It sounds too simple... (3+ / 0-)
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        FloridaSNMOM, weck, angelajean

        but they could start teaching the way you taught your son.  Not to play "catch up" to the left brain curriculum, but to teach kids who learn in a totally different way a different curriculum.  I bet the left-brainers would love a hands on, global, visual curriculum.  But if it was purely that, they would fail.

        And while times are changing - you'll notice that many textbooks are more visually dynamic and attempt to use real life connections to help global thinkers relate - the education world is slow to adapt.
        I made this correlation too, compared even to what the curriculum was when I taught math and English help to regular classroom kids. (My degree was actually to work with mentally handicapped...low IQ kids.  Totally different from right brainers.)  Most teachers don't get that you can be brilliant in math, yet not know your math facts.  It is so outside their frame of reference.

        And get the damn hands on and creative stuff back in the schools.  Shop, robotics, music, art, theatre, sports...are at least as important as academics.

        Yes, instead of having the "slow" class of readers, teach those kids how they learn. SHOW them, don't TELL them.  Imagine teachers having to take the lecture out of the classroom.  They would feel as lost as a right brainer does in the typical classroom.  

        If you starve the middle class, whose gonna pay for your crap?

        by rosabw on Sat Jul 28, 2012 at 11:31:58 AM PDT

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      •  Waldorf education (3+ / 0-)
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        FloridaSNMOM, rosabw, angelajean

        doesn't ask kids to read until they're about 9.  Of course, a lot of kids pick it up earlier, but by 9, very few run into difficulty with this complex task.  It's not widely studied in this country, tends to be used mostly in Waldorf/Steiner Schools, but the program seems to get good results -- thoughtful, confident graduates who do well in college/life and have a high tolerance for human nature's kaleidoscopic range.

        Some Waldorf teachers move on to public education and replicate elements of the program in their classrooms, but of course the kids only have them for a year, so it's not likely to have the same impact.

    •  I taught GED for many years, two comments on (2+ / 0-)
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      rosabw, angelajean

      the math:  some learners only focus when the pressure is actually on and  GED math is a lot like described above;  the problems are "real world" and can be approached from more than one direction.

      As an adult I can say that sequential learning in algebra didn't work for me at all, I barely scraped through the test after getting three extra hours of help a week after midterm.  I was able to "guess" what an answer might be, then plug it in to see if it worked in the equation.  It would take multiple attempts to guess correctly, but I did pass the test (using all the time available) by two points.

      Now, since I have had to teach algebra to students like me, I have learned a slower approach.  Since GED algebra is used in a word problem and not just hanging out there nekkid, it can be solved in other ways using either a plug and play approach like mine or multiple steps that "just make sense" to the test taker.

      Please donate to Okiciyap food pantry. . If love could have saved you, you would have lived forever.

      by weck on Sat Jul 28, 2012 at 11:34:57 AM PDT

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      •  I loved the way you described it.... (2+ / 0-)
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        weck, angelajean

        Sequential learning...exactly...I even tried going back to things I thought my son missed out on, but in sequence.  I think when he taught himself online, he did the plug and play approach so much that it eventually came to him.  I have often heard some kids can get answers and have no idea how they come up with them, but they are right.  Teachers can't stand that.  They want to SEE how they figured it out. but on a GED, all that counts is the right answer.

        Weck, Ben took his first 2 tests online, which was easier,  are things moving that way in your neck of the woods? (He still has 3 to go.  He can take them at his convenience at the school if he signs up ... http://www.gedonline.org/   They had JUST started it at his school, and he was one of the first to use it.  They get their non-official grades immediately, so they know how they did before they leave the testing site.)

        If you starve the middle class, whose gonna pay for your crap?

        by rosabw on Sat Jul 28, 2012 at 11:51:43 AM PDT

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        •  They were still doing paper/pencil in NY when I (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          angelajean

          retired 2 years ago,  didn't think they could insure security if the tester wasn't IDed at the site.  I'm going to check it out!

          Please donate to Okiciyap food pantry. . If love could have saved you, you would have lived forever.

          by weck on Sat Jul 28, 2012 at 12:01:20 PM PDT

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          •  This site looks to be a test prep site, he will (1+ / 0-)
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            angelajean

            probably need to take a GED exam through your state ed dept.  I used paper and pencil prep; my school wouldn't pay for online prep, and since I knew the test would be paper too, I didn't really fight for it.  My state would not let people sign up unless there was documentation that the student had already passed a practice test.  NY makes sure things are complicated.

            Please donate to Okiciyap food pantry. . If love could have saved you, you would have lived forever.

            by weck on Sat Jul 28, 2012 at 12:09:17 PM PDT

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            •  Yes, he did...take it through the Tech School (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              weck, angelajean

              He took it at the Tech school, had to make an appointment and pay for it beforehand... but the immediate feedback was really nice, as I guess normally it takes a week to be scored.

              I don't think he had to take the practice test in Georgia, we just did it for ...practice!  They did ask about it for the online test, though, and we had already done it.

              Online testing at the school was via Pearson Testing Services.  It really was nice that HE could choose the dates to a point, times, and amount of testing he took at one time.  We kept missing the date for one reason or another, and they only had them once a month for the paper pencil test.  The online tests are held all day once a week, and proctored (?) there at the schools community programs center.  He definitely was ID'd.  He had to have a signed SS card, besides government issued picture ID.

              God love ya, that was magnificent work you did.  

              If you starve the middle class, whose gonna pay for your crap?

              by rosabw on Sat Jul 28, 2012 at 03:59:41 PM PDT

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