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View Diary: They Aren't Gaffes (240 comments)

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  •  If what you take from this diary is that... (50+ / 0-)

    ...it says Romney's a dork, I urge you to read it again.

    In fact, the conclusion that so many people are coming to, that Romney's a dork, is dangerous. He's not your embarrassing Uncle Willard, knocking over the water glasses and getting casserole on his sleeve, although he does those things, too. He epitomizes the eviscerating capitalism of our era, the unproductive finance capitalism that produces nothing and destroys capitalist enterprises that, no matter how we may feel about their methods and treatment of workers, do produce something. Except as a means to make the neoconservatives and their pals comfortable with his jingoistic pronouncements, he doesn't give shit about foreign policy. He's so uninformed (except on the surface) about foreign policy that he doesn't even know what the Obama administration has done and is doing in that arena, which is why he says he'll do things differently when, in fact, in many cases he's saying he will do what Obama is already doing (for good or ill).

    I have no problem with presenting Romney as a laughingstock if this takes away votes. If people think he is a  clueless doofus, that's to our benefit. It is not to our benefit for us to believe he is no more than a clown.

    Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

    by Meteor Blades on Sat Jul 28, 2012 at 11:17:06 AM PDT

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    •  Indeed (32+ / 0-)

      I have long thought that this story should have gotten more attention because it, too, says something fundamental about the man and it ain't dorkiness.  Why would the Romneys risk doping a horse for $125,000, the amount of money he "earns" in, what? an hour, a day? And when they were caught , why didn't they settle immediately.  The evidence of the doping was pretty damning.

      Super Hit had Butorphanol, Delomidine, Romifidine, and Xylatine in its system at the time of his sale, according to court documents. Testified an expert: “In my 38 years of practice, I have never come across a drug screen such as this where the horse has been administered so many different medications at the same time
      This incident occurred in 2008 while Romney was running for President, yet he committed a criminal act for (to him) a paltry sum.  I can only come to one conclusion.  He really doesn't believe that there is anything wrong with lying, cheating and stealing to make money, and he will obviously never have enough.  

      If the Republicans ever find out that Barack Obama favors respiration, we'll be a one-party system inside two minutes. - Alan Lewis

      by MadRuth on Sat Jul 28, 2012 at 12:11:15 PM PDT

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    •  well put, MB (21+ / 0-)
      It is not to our benefit for us to believe he is no more than a clown.
      It is to our severe detriment to underestimate this puppet of Rove, Cheney and the whole neo/theocon movement.  I am reminded of Norquist's chilling requirement for a candidate at the CPAC Conference:
      All we have to do is replace Obama. ...  We are not auditioning for fearless leader. We don't need a president to tell us in what direction to go. We know what direction to go. We want the Ryan budget. ... We just need a president to sign this stuff. We don't need someone to think it up or design it. The leadership now for the modern conservative movement for the next 20 years will be coming out of the House and the Senate.

      The requirement for president?

      Pick a Republican with enough working digits to handle a pen to become president of the United States. This is a change for Republicans: the House and Senate doing the work with the president signing bills. His job is to be captain of the team, to sign the legislation that has already been prepared.

      These are the real forces against which we are fighting in this election.  They don't give a damn what Romney does or says, as long as he gets elected and signs what they tell him to sign.  Says what they tell him to say.  

      Perhaps for the first time in history, a true 'plutocratic corporation' is running for the office of the presidency and it looks like Norquist is Chairman of the Board, and Rove is CEO.  And Rush is Minister of Propaganda.  After all, now that corporations are people?

      Romney is an utter shell of a man who will do the expedient and profitable thing and serve his puppetmasters to a "t" and consider it 'good business practice' to lie and conceal from just about everyone else.

      Just their kind of guy.

      I belong to the “US” of America, not the “ME,$,ME,$,ME,$” of America!

      by SeaTurtle on Sat Jul 28, 2012 at 12:55:31 PM PDT

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    •  Amen! (5+ / 0-)

      I have been reading about his "gaffes" and people calling him stupid.  But I think that we emphazie that to our peril. I think he is smart and ruthless but not smart enough to see that it is not working for him, or maybe just too arrogant.

      I would rather be super cautious of him and his ways than relax into underestimating him.

      "Life without liberty is like a body without spirit. Liberty without thought is like a disturbed spirit." Kahlil Gibran, 'The Vision'

      by CorinaR on Sat Jul 28, 2012 at 01:51:49 PM PDT

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      •  His "Gaffes" are deliberate, to stir up the Repugs (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        isabelle hayes, StrayCat

        Romney is saying to his core audience in the U.S. that he has the guts to say what needs to be said to the foreigners.  

        Saying that London is unprepared for the Olympics is a "dog whistle" message that America (fuck yeah!) is superior in every way to those other countries.

    •  Bush was a PR stooge (18+ / 0-)

      he was the public face for the criminal organization. Romney has always been the actual string-puller, the real power behind the throne, the man pulling the plug on otherwise functional businesses and factories, and sucking the life out of everything he can.

      Bush was (is) an actor. Romney genuinely is a real-life Predator, the one doing the actual ripping and tearing. Bush had the greed, and the arrogant sense of entitlement, but I don't think he has 1/10th the cunning of Romney. But Bush had the weird ability/charisma to make just enough people forget about the born-on-third-base thing; Romney has lived a life so firmly cloistered off from the hoi polloi that he seems more out of touch than the entire Bush family put together.

      Romney's nomination gives us the chance to define Romney (as you say) as the very epitome of what capitalism (certainly a useful, even crucial thing in the abstract) has metastasized into. This one guy personifies every Lay, Blankfein, Madoff; pointlessly, rhythmically, mindlessly vacuuming more and more out of the system.

      And because Romney (and his party) are so eager to play that role, it will not take much at all to cement that impression in the minds of the electorate, I think.

      But certainly, we can't underestimate him....all of the foregoing merely serves to underline the fact that this means Romney already has plenty of power. There is a lot riding on Romney, and the people in the circles he runs in do not take their investments lightly.

      Views Differ On Shape Of Planet

      by nota bene on Sat Jul 28, 2012 at 01:52:57 PM PDT

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    •  Romney *does* care about foreign policy (0+ / 0-)

      where foreign policy is defined as exerting the influence of American exceptionalism imperialism on the world stage.

      Such a vision doesn't place much emphasis on diplomacy, however.

      Let us all have the strength to see the humanity in our enemies, and the courage to let them see the humanity in ourselves.

      by Nowhere Man on Sat Jul 28, 2012 at 04:02:39 PM PDT

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      •  Even America's 21st Century imperialists ... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        navajo, 417els

        ...believe in diplomacy (John Bolton aside, but he is more jsut plain hard right than neoconservative). Romney doesn't care about diplomacy, doesn't understand the need for it even among our allies. That doesn't make him unique, but it sets him apart from almost all foreign policy experts who, even when they hate it, know that sometimes guns and boots can't achieve what they wish.

        Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

        by Meteor Blades on Sat Jul 28, 2012 at 04:50:04 PM PDT

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        •  I don't know, MB. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          CocoaLove

          I may be out of my depth here, but I'm not sure that any of the neocons have ever been all that big on diplomacy. The whole idea of a "New American Century", it seems to me, is to project so much American power that other countries have to go along with us. In that kind of world, the U.S.A. wouldn't have "allies" as we usually think of them (essentially, countries that we compete with on friendly terms.) Instead, the U.S.A. would have allies the way a bully has henchmen.

          I think you have to go back to the first Bush presidency, and SoS James Baker, to find a Republican administration that cared about diplomacy. Certainly W, with his "with us or against us" bluster, wasn't real keen on it. (Colin Powell might have been a serviceable diplomat, but he was isolated from the rest of the administration and had little if any influence.)

          Let us all have the strength to see the humanity in our enemies, and the courage to let them see the humanity in ourselves.

          by Nowhere Man on Sat Jul 28, 2012 at 05:21:44 PM PDT

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          •  If you look beyond the bluster... (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Nowhere Man, StrayCat

            .. you'll find that the Bush administration carried out a huge amount of diplomacy.

            Now, yes, there was immense bullying going on, too. Mafia-style diplomacy, as Noam Chomsky has rightly characterized it. But that's not terribly new. While Jim Baker and Henry Kissinger were realist-school diplomats, they certainly did not eschew international power politics of the sort that overthrew governments not to Washington's liking nor arm-twisting those who they did chose not to supplant by surrogate coup d'etat.

            Some examples from the Bush years: Taking North Korea off the terror list; meeting with Iranian negotiators face to face; the status of force agreement with Iraq.

            Don't get me wrong. I am not saying that the Bush years were anything but deplorable when it came to international relations. But it wasn't quite the black hole, diplomacy-wise, that it has been painted. It's simply impossible to work without carrots even by the nation that carries the biggest stick on the planet.

            Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

            by Meteor Blades on Sat Jul 28, 2012 at 06:58:26 PM PDT

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    •  Yes, indeed, they produce POVERTY and INSTABILITY (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      StrayCat
      He epitomizes the eviscerating capitalism of our era, the unproductive finance capitalism that produces nothing and destroys capitalist enterprises that, no matter how we may feel about their methods and treatment of workers, do produce something.
      •  That tar-brush is quite wide. And unfair... (3+ / 0-)

        ...to a big portion of small businesses. That being said, if we were to recognize collective ownership as something besides the standard corporate model—cooperatives, for instance—we could introduce some real competition into an economic system that sorely needs it.

        Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

        by Meteor Blades on Sat Jul 28, 2012 at 07:03:55 PM PDT

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        •  The Tax arbitrage basis for Mitt Romney's wealth? (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          juliesie, StrayCat

          You think it's unfair to say that...

          The Tax arbitrage basis for Mitt Romney's wealth contributed directly to the federal budget deficit, town government' fiscal crises, people losing their homes, pensions, their health insurance...

          And all of those lay offs and disrupted supply chains have ripple effects, the opposite of positive multiplier effects.

          They may have occasionally contributed to the kind of "creative destruction" that is an integral part of American capitalism.

          Mitt Romney is recognized as a leader in the kind of "eviscerating capitalism of our era", where he, his partners, and their "investors" were able to use tax arbitrage to boost the appearance of profitability, obtain credit at favorable terms, cash out regardless of whether their "management" was successful or not, and then stiff the creditors (and the tax payers) if it didn't pan out.

          •  Pffft to Romney. He's a predator and predators... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Occam was an optimist

            ...must be declawed and defanged. I agree wholly with your take.

            My response was mistakenly directed to what I thought you were concluding about capitalist enterprises (not finance capital) that actually do produce something, the last part of my sentence. Upon rereading in conjunction with your follow-up, I see you were referring to what these predatory private equity operations produce. My error. And your assessment of what they produce—poverty and instability—I agree with.

            Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

            by Meteor Blades on Sat Jul 28, 2012 at 09:42:31 PM PDT

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            •  Agreed :) Capitalist enterprises do produce when (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Meteor Blades, StrayCat

              capital is deployed to meet a range of needs and when it circulates, such that actors at every level can and do enact transactions of their own choosing.

              When the capital gains exist primarily on paper, or are stashed off-shore in a tax-exempt vault, it's as if the 1% have put their money under their mattress(es).*

              Economic secession is probably my favorite term for it.

              *I mean, can one family with 8 homes really use more than 200 sets of 1000-thread count sheets?  /snark

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