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View Diary: The Daily Bucket - there's a naked lady in my frontyard (69 comments)

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  •  Please explain (5+ / 0-)

    what is black-lighting?  Sounds interesting.

    •  Basically the black light is just a way to attract (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Polly Syllabic, 6ZONite, Aunt Pat

      night flying insects, to be photographed,usually to a sheet or something similar hung beside the light. As to the use of a black  light I've never figured why that instead of just a regular white light. If I turn on my incandescent porch light it quickly attracts what seems like every insect in the county. And when night fishing for catfishing I avoid using a lantern or even a flashlight as much as possible because of the bugs that are instantly drawn to it. So I'm not sure why a black light is better but it must be because a couple of different people use them.

      Just give me some truth. John Lennon--- OWS------Too Big To Fail

      by burnt out on Sat Aug 04, 2012 at 01:06:37 PM PDT

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    •  A blacklight... (4+ / 0-)

      is placed in front of a white sheet.  Hopefully, the ultra-violet light attracts a variety of insects, which land on the sheet.  My intent is to photograph them.

    •  Many insects, particularly those that are (5+ / 0-)

      pollinators, can see and are attracted wavelengths in to the ultraviolet spectrum, because many flowers reflect ultraviolet light (or refract or have an excitation in that spectrum, not sure). You know, just another example of that evolution thingy. Like the moth with the foot long tongue that Darwin and Wallace predicted.

      In politics you've got to learn that overnight chicken shit can turn to chicken salad - LBJ

      by huntergeo on Sat Aug 04, 2012 at 04:01:44 PM PDT

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      •  But any insects that are attracted to ultraviolet (3+ / 0-)

        would almost certainly be diurnal in nature, no?

        Just give me some truth. John Lennon--- OWS------Too Big To Fail

        by burnt out on Sat Aug 04, 2012 at 04:21:20 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I think cause and effect have gotten a bit muddled (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          6ZONite, Polly Syllabic, burnt out

          in this thread.  Happens all the time when evolution is being discussed.  Done it many times myself.

          Insects have vision that is sensitive to somewhat shorter wavelengths of light than our own vision.  As far as I know this is true across all insects including groups that don't pollinate flowers.  It seems more likely that the flower patterns evolved in response to insect vision rather than the other way around.

          Attraction to light at night is thought to be a side product of using the moon or stars for navigation.  Unfortunately for the insect a porch light is a lot closer than the moon and they end up reaching the light source and don't 'know' what to do next.

          The use of black lights is based on the assumption that nocturnal insects are more attracted to light with a UV component (many of the insects drawn to black lights are also active in the day).  I don't know if anyone has actually tested this.

          "We are normal and we want our freedom" - Bonzos

          by matching mole on Sat Aug 04, 2012 at 05:20:06 PM PDT

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          •  If you get many diurnal insects come into your (3+ / 0-)

            black light then I can finally see a reason for using one. I've been trying to figure that out since the first time I heard of it. I occasionally see daytime active insects come to the porch light but those are definitely the exception to the rule.  So thanks for  the explanation.

            Just give me some truth. John Lennon--- OWS------Too Big To Fail

            by burnt out on Sat Aug 04, 2012 at 05:39:24 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  It's mostly diurnal insects that don't fly (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Polly Syllabic, 6ZONite, burnt out

              very much except to disperse to new areas that you get at black lights in my experience.  Things like aquatic insects, a lot of beetles, some true bugs and hoppers.  You don't generally get very many insects that fly around actively in the day - diurnal flies and wasps, bees, butterflies.  Things like that generally don't come to black lights.

              "We are normal and we want our freedom" - Bonzos

              by matching mole on Sat Aug 04, 2012 at 05:59:12 PM PDT

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              •  Beetles, especially the brown June bugs, not sure (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Polly Syllabic

                or their proper name, and also, surprisingly to me, quite a few lady bugs, come to the porch light pretty often. I occasionally see dobsonflies also,but not very often. Don't recall seeing any hoppers except a few very tiny ones. I don't remember any true bugs.  Oh yes, and lots of Mayflies if there happens to be a recent hatch.

                Just give me some truth. John Lennon--- OWS------Too Big To Fail

                by burnt out on Sat Aug 04, 2012 at 06:47:57 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

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