Skip to main content

View Diary: A Blue-Collar Girl in a White-Collar World (105 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  perhaps dumb was the wrong word (0+ / 0-)

    Unformed and uninformed, perhaps.

    I see freshmen from all over the US and a dozen other countries, too.  95% of them have little to no critical reasoning skills.  This leads me to believe that it is teenagers in general, and not any one system, which is he problem.

    And yes, I count myself among them.  I'm not too old to remember that I did some genuinely stupid things at 18.

    The only rule of freedom is not to destroy freedom.

    by fuzzywolf on Sat Aug 25, 2012 at 11:50:24 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  I would say a lot of that is their being... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      reconnected

      dumbed down by their schooling, taught to learn what the teacher tells them to learn and jump through the testing hoops when told.  They have turned off their inquisitive "thinking" minds long ago and maybe even allowed them to atrophy.

      Could that be what's going on?

      Cooper Zale Los Angeles http://www.leftyparent.com

      by leftyparent on Sun Aug 26, 2012 at 07:54:26 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I would agree if I had observed . . . (0+ / 0-)

        that homeschooled children were immune to this effect.

        Honestly, though, we do not expect critical thinking of teenagers.  We might expect a child has read, say, Moby Dick or Romeo and Juliet by age 16, but do we expect they have much to say about it?  Do we expect them to understand the ridiculousness of how our culture models timeless love on a story about 13 year olds?  Do we expect them to relate the outrage of a Montague and a Capulet loving each other to other divides in our own culture that love isn't supposed to cross?

        No, we don't expect these things.  The human brain is not fully mature at age 16, no matter what upbringing that 16 year old might have had.

        The only rule of freedom is not to destroy freedom.

        by fuzzywolf on Sun Aug 26, 2012 at 03:02:56 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Many of us adults don't expect it... (0+ / 0-)

          and I think it is a self-fulfilling prophecy.  I spent my teenage in a unique youth theater group led by one adult but mostly run by a bunch of teenagers.  It was amazing how capable and thoughtful we all were, though certainly we all had our bad moments.  But inspired by my peers in the group, at age 15 I even adapted a novel, Lord of the Flies, to the stage.

          http://www.leftyparent.com/...

          Cooper Zale Los Angeles http://www.leftyparent.com

          by leftyparent on Sun Aug 26, 2012 at 06:43:54 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Doing stupid things and being able to think (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      reconnected

      critically about academic subjects are two very different things, don't you think?

      I was a smart teenager who made some poor choices as well but that doesn't mean all teens are bound to make poor choices. Yes, their brains are still in the process of being wired but they are completely capable of having complex discussions and well-thought out ideas.

      My son has asked me why so many adults don't like teenagers. I wish I had a good answer for him, but I don't.

      •  Capable, sure, but . . . (0+ / 0-)

        it may seem overly pessemistic to say that only 5% of teens practice critical thinking, but how many adults do?  I put that number right around 50%.  Around half our adult population has never come close to Descartes cogito ergo sum.

        The only rule of freedom is not to destroy freedom.

        by fuzzywolf on Sun Aug 26, 2012 at 03:05:13 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site