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View Diary: Collapse of Siberia's Coastline is Releasing Huge Amounts of CO2 (137 comments)

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  •  Hot, not dry (4+ / 0-)

    The SE US will be quite hot, but it will have better access to water.  That part of the country also has considerable experience in ways to keep itself cool like AC, tall windows and architecture that is designed to let breezes flow through houses.  

    The frequency and intensity of landfalling hurricanes under a regimen of global warming is also unknown.  

     

    "Politics should be the part-time profession of every citizen who would protect the rights and privileges of free people and who would preserve what is good and fruitful in our national heritage." -- Lucille Ball

    by Yamaneko2 on Sat Sep 01, 2012 at 10:04:56 AM PDT

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    •  OK, I hate hot. (3+ / 0-)

      Cannot emphasize enough, I HATE hot. If I go north will there be no water? I'm sensing a bias against the north here. What's up with that?

      Ds see human suffering and wonder what they can do to relieve it. Rs see human suffering and wonder how they can profit from it.

      by JTinDC on Sat Sep 01, 2012 at 11:31:04 AM PDT

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      •  The Canadian Shield (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Don midwest, JTinDC

        There really is not much land north of I-94, east of the 100 degrees West longitude (currently the limit of non-irrigated agriculture) and the Canadian Shield.  This leaves you a wedge of southern Manitoba, central Minnesota, the northeast 3/4 of Wisconsin, most of Michigan and the triangle of Ontario and Quebec that lies south of a line from Georgian Bay to Montreal.

        Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Ohio and points south have seen the thermometer rise into the 90s and 100s repeatedly over a seven-week period from the solstice through the first week of August.  If this is the new normal, then you will not be comfortable. [1]

        If being able to raise food is not an issue, then the Canadian Shield would be fine.  Water will probably be plentiful, if not overabundant as outbreaks of warm, moist air cross the 50th parallel regularly and often.  

        Reducing the North American Breadbasket to wedges of Manitoba and Ontario and parts of four states is probably not a good move.  

        [1] For a while, the years that saw worldwide record heat manifested themselves in the Midwest as years where mild winters just cold enough to satisfy plants expecting freezes slowly segued through lengthy springs into mild and moist summers followed by balmy autumns climaxed by lengthy leaf seasons and bumper crops.  It looked like we would be among the winners of climate change.  

        "Politics should be the part-time profession of every citizen who would protect the rights and privileges of free people and who would preserve what is good and fruitful in our national heritage." -- Lucille Ball

        by Yamaneko2 on Sat Sep 01, 2012 at 11:52:06 PM PDT

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        •  A couple thoughts (0+ / 0-)

          Perhaps food will need to be scientifically designed so that it meets the human need of providing nutrients and doing so in the most efficent means possible. IOW, much of our current cultural traditions around food would have to be sacrificed as a matter of practicality. Food would no longer a social event, it becomes not much different from taking vitamins. This would suck because these cultural traditions give life meaning.

          Second, would large scale hydroponics offer any supplimental help? Particluarly in urban centers?

          Ds see human suffering and wonder what they can do to relieve it. Rs see human suffering and wonder how they can profit from it.

          by JTinDC on Sun Sep 02, 2012 at 05:08:26 AM PDT

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          •  This is just my speculation... (0+ / 0-)

            There are inefficiencies and suboptimalities that are closer to being solved.

            I live in Purdue University's home city, and get to hear scuttlebutt about what's coming up in GMO.  Doubling the yield of corn is considered achievable in the relatively short term.  I don't hear similar news about soybeans, but a doubling in those yields is conceivable.  

            The next area of efficiency will be dialing back meat consumption.  Part of this would take place with cheaper, more palatable substitutes for meat and part of it would come from learning about meat-free dishes.  Meatless traditions from various faith communities may be revived:  if Meatless Monday becomes popular, why shouldn't Catholics and Anglicans go back to Meatless Fridays while the Orthodox celebrate their various Lents?

            Most of us who can't afford the farmer's market or don't have time to prepare meals from scratch eat scientifically-designed food daily:  that's what processed foods prepared from GMO crops and animals are.  Whatever the lab produces will probably be quite palatable, if not excessively so.  

            Finally, increases in the price of food might well add to the ceremonies of its consumption.  The Sunday Roast, the Sabbath Brisket or the family gathering around a pile of fried chicken all date from times when food was costlier and more precious than it is today.  

            "Politics should be the part-time profession of every citizen who would protect the rights and privileges of free people and who would preserve what is good and fruitful in our national heritage." -- Lucille Ball

            by Yamaneko2 on Sun Sep 02, 2012 at 08:23:04 PM PDT

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    •  Better access to water? (0+ / 0-)

      What water?

      "I was a big supporter of waterboarding" - Dick Cheney 2/14/10

      by Bob Love on Sat Sep 01, 2012 at 06:27:48 PM PDT

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