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View Diary: Worrying rise of fascism in Europe (103 comments)

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  •  Horse shit. You know nothing about economics. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shmuelman, Deep Texan, Jim P

    Or the solutions to the probems in Europe. Please get yourself informed instead of spouting clichés. You can start here:
    http://www.georgesoros.com/...

    The case against Assange debunked: http://www.nnn.se/nordic/assange/suspicious.pdf

    by expatjourno on Tue Sep 11, 2012 at 07:09:44 AM PDT

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    •  There are (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      kefauver, Woody, lotlizard

      more eloquent and convincing form of disagreement. Both of Soros and Sparhaw are right. Yes, they can both be right.

      Germany's leadership has inflationphobia for the historical reason but also because right now the full working Germany is really a little of a trick: there are many people with partime subsidiced jobs. A rise of inflation will affect a lot the artificially low German employment. Soros solutions are in general sensible but for them to happen there needs to be a larger political cohesion between the euro countries and the German public opinion ain't happy with any of it, understandably. And all that does not help the structural problems that Spain and Italy and Greece have DOes have to be solved locally and structural problems are the ones that hardly ever get solved

      •  Spain and Italy don't have structural problems. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mookins

        It is simply wrong to lump them together with Greece.

        The case against Assange debunked: http://www.nnn.se/nordic/assange/suspicious.pdf

        by expatjourno on Tue Sep 11, 2012 at 07:38:37 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Oh they do (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Sparhawk

          No where as bad as Greece's but they do have'em. Hell listen to any politician form the left or right in both countries and they'll tell you they do have them. Most countries have some structural problems

          Greece was the epitome of the idea, present in other Mediterranean countries, that when your party gets in power you get a job in government or subsidy or agency or whatever for anyone in your side. Political appointees are not just the head of gov. agencies but from them down to the janitorial staff. Also in Spain and Italy the collusion of politicos and certain banks and industries that were once nationalized but they are not but kind of is very detrimental. Gov. investment is so centered in building thing cause everyone can see them and you can have a big inaugural speech that investment in research and education is suffering

          Just to name a few

          •  Germany has structural problems. The UK has... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Pescadero Bill

            ...structural problems. France has structural problems. The U.S. has structural problems.

            Name a country that does not have structural problems.

            The case against Assange debunked: http://www.nnn.se/nordic/assange/suspicious.pdf

            by expatjourno on Tue Sep 11, 2012 at 10:27:47 AM PDT

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          •  Is it different in the USA (0+ / 0-)

            As I look at NY State, I say no. I see the same things here.

            Trouble is, the number of gov't workers in Greece is smaller than it is not only in the eurozone, but also the USA, by proportion.

            Yet all the blame goes to the little people. Few look at the massive corruption at the top. And the racist stuff is mere distraction.

            There are two kinds of people in this world. The kind who divide the world into two kinds of people, and the kind who don't.

            by upstate NY on Tue Sep 11, 2012 at 08:32:08 PM PDT

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        •  Why do people differentiate between... (0+ / 0-)

          huge debts racked up by the private sector and huge debts racked up by the public sector?

          In both cases, we have easy money creating asset bubbles. It happened in Spain, it happened in Greece. Why valorize private debt over public debt, especially when the common occurrence is for private debt to become private debt.

          Spain began this debacle with 40% debt to GDP. They are at 95% now in 2 short years, and rising fast. So why valorize private debt when it has all been made public debt? Same with Ireland.

          We need to look at total amounts of debt, realize that this debt was used to stoke demand and give the appearance of hot economies (Spain and Greece were being lauded for growth as recently as 2008).

          The key thing to look at is malinvestment. if you're squandering your money on military weaponry (Greece) or on asset bubble construction (Spain) you will be left with a big headache.

          Our experience is that private debt becomes public debt, therefore we should not differentiate too much between both forms of malinvestment. The private sector can be as spendthrift as the public one, if not moreso.

          There are two kinds of people in this world. The kind who divide the world into two kinds of people, and the kind who don't.

          by upstate NY on Tue Sep 11, 2012 at 08:36:19 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

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