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View Diary: Open thread for night owls: National Voter Registration Day, happens Tuesday, Sept. 25 (135 comments)

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  •  I think you know, Meteor Blades..., (0+ / 0-)

    ... that I respect you and care about you (or, you should, but just in case you don't already know, that is a true statement on my part).  You have my utmost admiration as one of the most brilliant people on this blog.

    Up until tonight, I don't think I've disagreed with much of anything you've ever written (or, if I did, it was something you wrote that I missed), so you and I have been on the same page about 99.9999% of the time.  Tonight, however, I have to take a position slightly different from yours.

    You said (regarding voter registration and voting):

    .... it's an insult to the men and women who lost their blood and sometimes their lives in the struggle to ensure citizens' fundamental right to choose their own leaders.
    No person, after the end of WWII, in any quasi-constitutional/legal or outright unconstitutional and illegal war based on lies for oil, has fought and died for any of my rights (or yours, or anyone else's).  Not one!  I was either too young to object or my female voice was ignored if I didn't support the others.  The military people in Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraq all fought and died for the sake of the profit margins of the military-industrial-complex, then corporations who needed a cheap place to hire slave labor, and, more recently, for the sake of oil and mercenary corporations who want the oil fields, or want to be able to put oil pipelines in another country so they have a way of getting oil from an oil field to the sea ports.  (Yeah, a very few mercenaries died, too, but they were only in the last "war" for the macho glory and the money; I can honestly say I don't give a rat's ass about them and the greed they died for - the oil corporations should have paid for their services, not our tax dollars.)

    If anyone died for my rights, it was during or before WWII, and before I was born.  I do genealogy research, remember, and I have ancestors who fought in the Revolutionary War (and one Loyalist who went to Canada).  They did, in fact, fight so they and their descendants (me included) wouldn't have to pay unfair taxes because no one represented them ('no taxation without representation,') and many first arrived on these shores to not only gain a profit to pay back their investors but so they could be free of the monarchy and government-imposed religion (and eventually gain the vote and have that right and privilege since I can't ignore the fact that I'm also a female).

    Since I was born nine months after VE Day, that would mean every person who who fought and/or died in any of these quasi-legal or quasi-constitutional wars or outright unconstitutional and illegal wars AFTER WWII (Korea, Vietnam where I lost so many friends, or this flat-out unconstitutional Bushista Folly in Afghanistan and Iraq, and the continuance of same on Obama's part) has fought and died for ANY of my rights - or yours or anyone else's in this country.  I hoped Obama was going to stop those wars (even though he very carefully selected his words just before election day '08 so I knew he could walk back from those promises); he only pulled troops out of Iraq to settle them in a "friendly" country next door where it would be easy to send them back to where they were to fight again (they're not all home yet, and Guard troops are still regularly being rotated to the Mideast in MN, so I'm assuming that's true for Guard troops in other states), and we are STILL in Afghanistan where it's more dangerous than ever (my youngest nephew refused to re-up after the second tour of duty, told the recruiter he didn't have enough zeros behind the numbers for the signing bonus; he got lucky and came home to finally be with his kids who had forgotten him), and Obama added insult to injury by starting the drone bombings in Pakistan (and goodness knows where else) before he was in office a whole week.  Then he went to collect his Nobel Peace Prize that was awarded to him for his promises and because he was not Dumbya (he certainly did nothing to earn it before he was elected, and has done nothing to earn it afterwards either); heck, he didn't even stay in Oslo long enough for the closing ceremonies and dinner and entertainment.

    We LOST our constitutional rights, thanks to Dumbya, Dickie, and their lying war criminal cohorts, AND (more's the pity) thanks to our Congre$$ Critter$ who voted to pass the Patriot Act, MCA '06 (and Obama's unconstitutional "fix" with MCA '09), and the FISA fiasco '08 (which Obama voted for); three days after Obama voted FOR the FISA fiasco in '08, he said if he were elected he'd expand and increase funding for the 'office of faith-based initiatives,' an unconstitutional office by anyone's normal standards (so much for his 'constitutional scholar' credentials).  All these unconstitutional things have been extended in the Obama years.  We STILL do not have our rights returned to us because none of our "Dear Leaders" (legislative or executive branches of government, in particular) have seen fit to repeal those erroneously-passed pieces of $h!te legislation.  Adding insult to injury, Obama is going after whistleblowers like they are the ones who are the criminals (just exactly like Dumbya and Dickie did), not the ones who are reporting illegalities by others, and the whistleblowers are the ones who are supposed to be protected by our laws!  How demeaning - and wrong - of our DoJ, Holder, and even Obama, for that matter!  So..... WHEN do you think we might expect our three branches of government to give us back our rights by repealing those unconstitutional pieces of legislation...?

    Nor, for that matter, thanks to the Citizen's United decision by $COTU$, will the American people ever be able to freely elect people to represent us because rich corporations can use money as "First Amendment free speech" and buy the votes of OUR Congress Critters - the people WE elected to represent US (corporations as people, my big fat arse; they can't vote, but they can buy politicians).  So far as I can tell, the only senator who tries to work on behalf of We The People is Bernie Sanders, and he's trying to get a bill through Congress to make Citizen's United unconstitutional.  More power to him!  (My own two Dem senators and my previous Dem rep almost always vote with the Repukes, and it is pissing me off no end.)

    Then there was the matter of health care insurance.  No one in Congress, except Dennis Kucinich, wanted a single-payer, not-for-profit, government-run health care system (Kucinich was regularly and soundly denigrated here on DK before the '08 election regarding single-payer not-for-profit health insurance).  The insurance, medical, and pharmaceutical corporations (the latter left over from the Medicare fraud perpetrated on seniors and disabled people who were forced to pay corporations for prescription insurance because of laws passed when Dumbya was in office) used their money to buy both our Congre$$ Critter$ AND Obama who sounded semi-friendly to a single-payer system before the election.  After the election, it was the same old excuse I heard "Impeachment-is-off-the-table" Pelosi and Reid whine about when Repukes had them over a barrel during those miserable gawdforsaken Bushista years: 'Well, this is the best we can do for now, so we might as well pass it and we can work to change it later.'  Bull$h!t!!!  Later came..., and yet another fucked-up $COTU$ decision that says it's constitutional for us to be forced to pay a for-profit insurance corporation since it can now "magically" be considered a tax, as can the penalty for those who don't want it have to fork over a fine if they don't want to give a corporation more windfall profits (and we all know that the next corporations to have "record-setting-profits" will be insurance, medical, and pharmaceutical corporations.  Well, isn't that precious?

    The PRACTICAL - and FAR less costly - thing to do would be to put everyone into Medicare (infrastructure is in place, it actually runs efficiently, it costs less because it's not-for-profit so there's no overhead needed to pay for executive bonuses and stockholder shares, and hiring more Americans here in this country to handle the paperwork would create new jobs - and payroll taxes).  Remember how hard diarists here on the Great Orange Satan begged us to urge, coax, then demand and beg our Congre$$ Critter$ via emails, phone calls, faxes, going to meetings when they came home on breaks, to pass a 'single-payer health care insurance plan?'  I do.  I also knew with the cement-hard passiveness that Obama and our Congre$$ Critter$ exhibited that a single-payer health-care plan administered by Medicare and handled at the government level (like civilized countries in Europe do) was the very last thing that any of them (except Kucinich) would consider.  Even Kucinich, the last hold-out, folded after a ride on AF-1.  So, now we are stuck with a ginormous financial boondoggle for health care in the future and prices will continue to go up, up, up, and up some more because not one of our cowardly Congre$$ Critter$ has the courage to put caps on their profits WE are forced to provide.

    [Oh, another "loophole" - and slick way of laundering money between pharmaceutical and insurance corporations:  One of my gout meds, the one I know works by itself with no other meds, in spite of diarrhea as a severe side effect if one takes it at full dosage during a major gout attack, is no longer going to be covered by Medicare Part D insurance in the fairly near future.  It currently costs me a few cents under $10 every three months for one of my two gout meds because they're generic; I'm poor and getting Social Security, but I can afford that.  My druggist informed me a couple of months ago that the drug companies will no longer make the cheap one (with the SAME ingredients it's had for centuries since colchicine is a known and proven remedy for severe gout attacks!)..., but instead the SAME pill will be made, with exactly the SAME ingredients, only this time it's gotten full FDA approval, it's now been trademarked/copyrighted, and the pharmacist's price he has to pay to obtain it is close to $500 for the same amount of pills.  Figure out the profit margin.  I don't even know if I will be able to get the one pill that actually works if I have another super severe gout attack in the future, but if I do, the insurance company will have to be able to fork over the money 'cuz I can't.]

    Meanwhile, the illegal wars continue, no one with half a brain gives a damn because we still want all our troops home and neither Congress nor the president are listening to us about that issue; the president has taken it upon himself (apparently) to authorize drone bombing which violates the Constitution (just like Dumbya!) since only Congress can authorize legal and constitutional wars and authorize the amount of money spent on them.  The prisoners are still at Gitmo.  WE THE PEOPLE STILL do not have our rights because those POS laws passed during Bushista's time have not been officially repealed.  Wall Street and the banks are still out of control because Gramm-Leach-Bliley has not been repealed and Glass-Steagall reinstated.... et cetera and so on and so forth.

    Obama and some Dems have fallen into calling Earned Benefits we receive with Social Security and Medicare "entitlements."  I think under Obama our political a$$hole$ of both political parties will start "fixing" both, and in so doing fix what was never broken, and all so their friendly investment bankers and bankers and Wall Street gamblers can siphon off our "surplus" money to divert it to offshore accounts (like what Enron and those felons did).

    I think the wars and (clandestine) torture will continue, and none of us will have a clue as to why they're being fought.  Already we don't know why (except for the one for oil, that is).

    I think some state legislatures will fold to the fanatic reichwingnuts and take abortion and other reproductive choices away from women and some will end up being the stereotypical 'good ol' boy's woman: barefoot and pregnant.'  When choices re taken away, severe depression sets in.  Sadly, some will die (needlessly, just like my maternal grandmother) without those choices which will again be made illegal again (the fundie churches have as much money as corporations, maybe more).

    Oh, I'll likely hold my nose and vote for evil again - "lesser of two evils" is STILL voting for evil 'cuz my choices have been taken away as long as the Congre$$ Critter$ are all taking corporate and banking and Wall Street bribes.  The only "guarantee" we have is that after election day the people WE "elected" will sure as hell NOT be paying attention to us pesky little voters.  They'll go back to politely listening just before the next election day.  (We elect the electors anyway.  They don't really have to vote for the people we tell them to.  Sometimes the electoral college works well, but I'm no longer sure we need it as long as $COTU$ can stop a vote recount, and as long as e-voting machines in other states can be rigged and do not have a paper trail for a valid recount.  Those elections can be stolen out from under us, as the 2000 and '04 elections were.)

    As far as registering?  I live in Minnesota.  Guano Loco Bachmann and her idiot supporters aside, our voting registration laws were made way back when we were mostly an agrarian economy and farmers couldn't be gallivanting higher, thither, and yon just to go register to vote; they had farms to run, cows to milk, fences to build, etc.  Hence, same/election day voter registration was the most efficient way of doing things, and no mucking about with having to do so every year; it still is.  I registered when I moved umpteen years ago.  I do not have to re-register unless I move where I'll have to vote in a different precinct.  My name shows up on the same printout every election day at the same polling precinct year after year after year after year.  I vote by filling in the ovals on a paper ballot.  When I'm done, I check to make sure I've voted for the Democrats, then take the ballot and run it through the optical scanner.  I then collect my little "I Voted" sticker and exit.  Takes all of five minutes as long as I go in the early morning when no one else is around.  (There are voter registration forms all over, including one in the phone book.  It's easy enough to re-register for a new address if/when it becomes necessary.)

    There's a stupid referendum to vote on this year about voter ID cards that the state legislature with the new Repuke majority (for the first time in over a quarter of a century) wants passed.  I will be voting against it.  After the '62 governor recount, the '08 senatorial recount, and the '10 governor recount (and a couple of smaller local races that needed recounts) where ZERO voter fraud was discovered, you'd think they know better than to waste our time like that..., but, noooooooooooooo....  Idiots!

    As long as we defeat that idiotic referendum and leave the voter registration laws AS IS, many states could benefit from following Minnesota's lead, including getting paper ballots and optical scanners.

    My original point before I got off on a tangent remains:  Since WWII ended, there's not one single person who has fought or died for my right to vote, your right to vote, or for anyone else's right to vote, or fought or died for any of OUR constitutional rights (many rights which we still, technically, no longer have since Congress has not seen fit to repeal the unconstitutional laws that were passed during the Bushista years).  All of the fighting and dying after the end of WWII was done for, and on behalf of, the military-industrial-complex and the oil and mercenary corporations and corporations who demand tax breaks so they can "create jobs" overseas and get a tax break for doing that, too.  All of that fighting and dying after WWII has put us in debt so far that it may not be paid off for more than six generations from now.

    Not one.  WWII and before, yes.  Not after.

    I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

    by NonnyO on Mon Sep 24, 2012 at 01:53:49 AM PDT

    •  Were you around im the 60's? (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Lawrence, OLinda, laurnj, Meteor Blades

      People died trying to get the right to vote, for ALL Americans, during the Civil Rights movement.

      The Voting Rights Act wasn't signed until 1965.

      With all respect, you are incorrect.

      •  I was talking about the penchant... (0+ / 0-)

        ... for people saying those in the military are fighting and dying for We The People (right to vote, freedom of speech, etc.), not the Civil Rights movement.

        Yes, I was around in the '60s.  I was a senior in high school in 1963 when JFK was shot and The Beatles appeared on Ed Sullivan a little over two months later in 1964.

        In 1965 I was busy bringing forth life.

        Under the laws of the day, I couldn't vote until I was 21 - in 1967.  Growing up it was always assumed I'd register and vote when I was old enough, just like everyone else in the family and extended family, and the neighbors where we lived.  Voting was just one of those things one was expected to do as an adult (even in the face of tragedy one voted; on the way to the funeral of my mother's next-youngest brother in 1964, my parents stopped and voted before we drove out of town for the funeral - both my parents were Democrats).

        Most of the non-military marching, fighting and dying in the Civil Rights movement happened 1500-2000 miles south-southeast of me, so it's fair to say that people in the Civil Rights movement fought and died for many other people, but voter suppression did not affect my life directly since I grew up knowing I was expected to do my civic duty and vote when I became a legal adult.

        I know others grew up in areas where voter suppression was an issue and I respect their experiences for what it was.  It just so happens I never lived anywhere where it was an issue, so it's never been a part of my life experiences.

        Have a nice day.

        I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

        by NonnyO on Mon Sep 24, 2012 at 03:48:57 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I was talking about those who died... (0+ / 0-)

      ...for equal rights (including the right to vote) in this country, not in foreign wars.

      Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

      by Meteor Blades on Mon Sep 24, 2012 at 10:15:52 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  As I told marigold above: (0+ / 0-)
        Under the laws of the day, I couldn't vote until I was 21 - in 1967.  Growing up it was always assumed I'd register and vote when I was old enough, just like everyone else in the family and extended family, and the neighbors where we lived.  Voting was just one of those things one was expected to do as an adult (even in the face of tragedy one voted; on the way to the funeral of my mother's next-youngest brother in 1964, my parents stopped and voted before we drove out of town for the funeral - both my parents were Democrats).

        Most of the non-military marching, fighting and dying in the Civil Rights movement happened 1500-2000 miles south-southeast of me, so it's fair to say that people in the Civil Rights movement fought and died for many other people, but voter suppression did not affect my life directly since I grew up knowing I was expected to do my civic duty and vote when I became a legal adult.

        I know others grew up in areas where voter suppression was an issue and I respect their experiences for what it was.  It just so happens I never lived anywhere where it was an issue, so it's never been a part of my life experiences.

        When I moved away from where I was born and raised, it was 1200 miles straight west, and it was another location where voter suppression was not an issue.

        I guess I'm lucky.

        The way my parents raised me, voting is like the seasons coming and going.  Election day comes, one does what one is expected to do and one votes.  It's just that simple.  Oh, and we had Civics class when I was a senior in high school, so that reinforced my parents' example of voting.  [Was some article I read a while back true and Civics is no longer a high school course?  That's just wrong.]

        Still, the only ones who marched, protested, fought, or died for "my" right to vote were Suffragettes for women's right to vote, or soldiers in any wars from WWII back who fought for our "freedoms" [freedoms we no longer have since our Congress Critters have not seen fit to give them back to us under Obama, but have extended the suppression of most of our constitutional rights that we lost during the Bushista years because our Congress Critters gave them up "on our behalf" just when they should have told Dumbya to go to hell - if any cause was worth fighting for, it would be that:  force our Congress Critters and the President to repeal the Patriot Act, MCA '06 & '09, and FISA fiasco '08 & modifications since then, and to disband the 'office of faith-based initiatives' - the latter could be done with a countering executive order since that's how it was created to run out of the president's office].  Post-WWII when I've been alive?  No.

        Where I have lived in the US, voter suppression was never an issue.  It was always assumed adults would register and vote.

        I find the two+ years of making mountains out of molehills no bigger than a pimple and campaigning and political positioning and strutting and knotted knickers and pearl clutching and punditocracy losing their minds and the verbal garbage they spew regularly during all that lengthy (and unnecessary) campaign blabbering disgusting beyond belief.

        I'd far rather have this temporary insanity and idiocy break out only between the national conventions and election day (approximately 90 days).  After two+ years of yapping politicians and political pundits and enough faux outrage over nothing important (like before the '08 and '10 and '12 elections), I understand election apathy and get why people don't register or vote.  By the time election day rolls around, they are bored senseless and wish politicians would just go away.

        It gets really tiresome to listen to all that faux outrage and nonsense for years and years before election day (flag lapel pins are stupid things to talk about, and including religion IN government is unconstitutional, as would be any laws passed based on religious 'values'); like a whining child or spouse, one tunes it out, or turns off the TV or radio or leaves the computer on permanent mute.

        Besides Civics classes in high school and teaching kids that it's their civic duty to vote, a partial solution to voter apathy is to ban multi-year political campaigning and limit it to not more than three months before election day.  It could save millions or billions in political fund-raising, and maybe - just maybe - our congress critters could actually stay in DC instead of campaign, attend House or Senate sessions, and get something done for those who elected them, not the corporations who bought their services with their Citizens United free speech money.  [That's either my private daydream or the funniest sentence I've ever written.]

        I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

        by NonnyO on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 02:01:08 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  "Where I have lived in the US... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          willyr

          ...voter suppression was never an issue.  It was always assumed adults would register and vote."

          I don't know exactly where you lived in the West, but voter suppression against Indians is STILL an issue in many places. It's an issue in the inner cities of Ohio against blacks in the most recent elections.

          Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

          by Meteor Blades on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 07:45:38 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  The first... (0+ / 0-)

            ... 45 years of my life across three states, I lived roughly 100-125 miles south of the Canadian border.  I'm not that much farther south of the Canadian border now.

            I read about voter suppression in other states and it feels like I'm reading about events on an alien planet.

            I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

            by NonnyO on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 09:20:41 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Well, again, since I don't know which states... (1+ / 0-)

              ...those are, let me just say that New York, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota have all had voter suppression of American Indians in the past 25 years, Minnesota as recently as eight years ago.

              Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

              by Meteor Blades on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 09:27:00 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  In the dingtoolies (0+ / 0-)

                Minnesota, Idaho, Washington.  I said up above I live in MN.

                I worked for one of the tribes for five years.  For employee meetings around election season there was always a big push to register to vote and to vote.  One of those years they favored one candidate and wanted their employees to vote for him (don't remember the issue, but it had to do with favoring something to do with gambling and tribes owning or controlling gambling in the state which would support the Indian monopoly on gambling; he was outside of my voting district but inside the area where the casino was located).

                Virtually all the tribes have casinos in Minnesota (one or more), so they are a huge contributor to the tax base because they employ both Indians and non-Indians.  They have opposed gambling at the horse racetrack down by the Cities and were successful about it for quite some time since they have a monopoly on gambling in the state.  When the state legislature wanted gambling (cards and slot machines) at the racetrack besides the horse betting so they could have an additional way of acquiring revenue to pay for those stupid stadiums they have recently built and the ones they just approved this year that will be built in the near future, the tribes blocked it (and then our Dem gov and Repuke legislature most recently "compromised" and snuck in a couple of extra local Cities' stadiums in the final bill, called a special session to vote on the stadiums we do not need, and they still have to figure out a way to pay for them).

                The tribes wield some rather large monetary clout in MN.  Probably in WI, ND, SD, and/or other states too, if the tribes have casinos.  I don't know.  I don't gamble; I only worked at a casino, didn't like it for the high stress, and employees couldn't gamble at the casino where they worked.  With that much financial clout, there's no way the tribes would stand for any kind of voter suppression - particularly not when they want their tribal members to participate in voting and they know voter registration is so easy to accomplish here.  (OTOH, each tribe does have their own constitution and each elects their own chiefs and other governing officials, and I have no idea what their tribal laws are governing registration or voting on the individual Reservations.  I know each has their own license plates.)

                Where in MN was the voter suppression supposed to be?  It's so easy to register to vote in this state, including election-day registration at a precinct (with proper ID, it's all listed on the SoS web site) that voter suppression sounds like fiction.  There are voter registration forms in the phone book, in fact, and at various city and county offices.  Once registered, if one does not move then one's name is on the printout at the local precinct for every election.  [At the last two or three recounts the Repukes tried to claim 'voter fraud,' but couldn't come up with any examples in front of the judge.  That's a different matter, but this imaginary 'voter fraud' they concocted is why they want this referendum voted on this fall for a state constitutional amendment to require voter ID cards, one of two proposed amendments to vote on this year.]  My name is on the printout at the same place every year.  They ask for my name, I sign the register.  My DL w/pix is with me, but no one ever asks for ID, just whether or not I'm the one at that address (there's another person with the same first and last name at a different address within the same precinct), I get a number, give it to the person who hands out ballots, then go vote by filling in ovals on a paper ballot, check to make sure I voted for the Democrats, then go and insert the ballot in the optical scanner, get my 'I voted' sticker and leave.  If I go early in the morning when it's not busy, it takes all of five minutes.

                Registering AND voting are both ridiculously easy in MN, but we have a history of close vote totals - hence the need for recount laws - going back to a famous governor recount in 1962 (I remember when it happened; I was a sophomore in high school - it's the same year I got interested in genealogy research as a result of a biology project), so laws governing recounts have been on the books a very long time (written before it became popular to write loopholes into laws).  The most famous recent recount was when Al Franken was elected in '08.  Two years ago, just two years after Franken was elected to the US Senate, there was another recount in '10 when Mark Dayton was elected governor (number totals were wider so his opponent conceded).

                Between easy voter registration & voting process, paper ballots, and a transparent recount process that's easy to do because of those paper ballots, many states could benefit from laws similar to what Minnesota has.

                I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

                by NonnyO on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 12:23:07 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  It was no fiction. There was a lawsuit... (2+ / 0-)

                  ...involved, which you can read about here.

                  As for South Dakota, Shannon County (Pine Ridge) has been a focal point of voter suppression efforts against the Lakota for decades. Fewer polling stations per capita and fewer early voting hours are just some of the efforts that have been made to suppress the Indian vote there.

                  This is not a imaginary problem.

                  Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

                  by Meteor Blades on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 01:04:23 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  The first time... (0+ / 0-)

                    ... I registered after moving here, I used my driver's license (picture+current address) and a utility bill with a current address.

                    There are several different ways of proving precinct residency listed on the SoS web site.

                    I note that '05 story includes the info that tribal IDs now have current address listed.

                    I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

                    by NonnyO on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 02:56:36 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                •  no fiction, read this report (0+ / 0-)

                  here.

                  here is one quote from diary i am posting later today:

                  In South Dakota’s June 2004 primary, Native American voters were prevented from voting after they were challenged to provide photo IDs, which they were not required to present under state or federal law.
                  Also, in South Dakota, general public had like 6 weeks for in person early voting, but Pine Ridge and Rosebud Reservations in South Dakota had few days only.

                  Lots of ways to suppress votes, only limitation is the disenfranchiser's warped imagination.

                  Earth provides enough to satisfy every man's need, but not every man's greed. Mohandas K. Gandhi

                  by Patriot Daily News Clearinghouse on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 01:28:51 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Do general public... (0+ / 0-)

                    ... voting rules and regs apply on their Reservations?  Or not?  Or do they overlap?

                    As sovereign nations in their own right, the tribes set their own laws for what applies on the Reservations (not sure about other places, but in MN each Res/tribe has its own vehicle license plates and have their own law enforcement officers).  Some choose to go with laws identical to state or federal laws, some don't.  That is entirely up to the individual tribes.

                    Whether a person's residence is on or off of a Reservation would make a difference.

                    I don't have a single clue about SD law or how Res laws differ or are the same as state or federal laws..., but here in MN where one votes is determined by the address of one's residence which is listed on one's driver's license (with picture) or official state ID (with picture) and evidence of that address (utility bill) - or someone vouching for one, etc. (whatever applies on that list of alternate ways of proving residency on the MN SoS web site).  There are several pages of info.

                    I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

                    by NonnyO on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 03:18:01 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  You're missing the point (0+ / 0-)

                      You said that there could be no voter suppression against Indian voters because they have too much financial clout:

                      With that much financial clout, there's no way the tribes would stand for any kind of voter suppression - particularly not when they want their tribal members to participate in voting and they know voter registration is so easy to accomplish here.
                      Minnesota, for all its great laws that you want other states to follow, is no different when it comes to voter suppression:
                      Citing requirements in a new state election law, Republican Secretary of State Mary Kiffmeyer directed that tribal ID cards could not be used for voter identification by Native Americans living off reservations. Heffelfinger and his staff feared that the ruling could result in discrimination against Indian voters. Many do not have driver’s licenses or forms of identification other than the tribes’ photo IDs.
                      Your comment also indicates that you are limiting voter suppression to voter registration, and you believe voter suppression is a fiction:
                      Where in MN was the voter suppression supposed to be?  It's so easy to register to vote in this state, including election-day registration at a precinct (with proper ID, it's all listed on the SoS web site) that voter suppression sounds like fiction.
                      Voter suppression is not just registration. Please see my earlier comment that provides two examples of voter suppression in the voting process.

                      And then you focus on your own experience with voter registration and voting, what info you need to provide at the polls. But unless you are Indian, or some other target of voter suppression efforts, your experience is not relevant.

                      Earth provides enough to satisfy every man's need, but not every man's greed. Mohandas K. Gandhi

                      by Patriot Daily News Clearinghouse on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 04:50:49 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

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