Skip to main content

View Diary: "I thought it was a good idea, until I learned it was Obama's" - addendum (220 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  I loved this about Bloomberg in NYC (8+ / 0-)

    - that he mandated calorie counts be posted for food service operations of a certain category.

    I have literally stopped in my tracks and changed my mind because of having that information in front of me at a moment of decision.

    Of course, then he went a little nuts with the 16 oz soda ban thing.

    Obesity is such an issue behind so many of the health problems that cause rising costs today.  Obesity is definitely the enemy - and education is the best solution.

    However...

    There's a huge difference between giving people info so they can make an informed choice - and making their choices for them.

    "When a man tells you that he got rich through hard work, ask him: 'Whose?' Don Marquis

    by hopesprings on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 09:07:00 AM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  I really wish they'd pass the soda tax (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      nuclear winter solstice, BachFan

      and make it national.

      Of course, it will never happen, but I can wish.

      I really think there are 2 things fueling the obesity crisis in our kids - parents who won't let them play outside/not enough exercise, and too much soda and fast food.

      In some neighborhoods I totally understand not letting the kids play outside. It's just not safe.

      That's not the majority of neighborhoods though.

      And kids' diets are just atrocious. Really bad. Mine is bad, but mine is light years better than most of the kids I see. Tons of soda, chips, grease, sugar, not a veggie or fruit in sight.

      An Olympic athlete would stand a good chance of being overweight on that diet.

      •  she called it "tonic" but she meant soda pop when (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        hlsmlane, BachFan

        my Grandma used to say, "It's hummingbird food. Are you a hummingbird?"

        Earlier today a friend and I were reminiscing about being a kid when you might be asked to share a ten ounce bottle of coke (real sugar, though) with a sibling, and a small at McD's was 8 ounces.

        "Had we gone the invasion route, the US could conceivably still be an occupying power in a bitterly hostile land." -- George H. W. Bush, "A World Transformed," 1998 memoir (explaining why the US did not occupy Iraq in the 1991 "Desert Storm" war)

        by nuclear winter solstice on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 10:33:35 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  A soda tax would have been much more effective (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        hopesprings, BachFan

        in NY than the 16 oz limit, IMO.

      •  Not just soda though. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        wonmug

        Soda gets a bad rap. Sure, it's empty calories which certainly don't help. But the problem doesn't lie with soda

        The culprit is the combination of fat, salt and sugar. These together are almost impossible to put down. Think of most of the junk food that people crave. Now read the ingredients. You'll see these three in large amounts (the higher on the ingredients list, the more  there is). Even where you don't expect them -- "healthy" baked potato chips, anyone? -- there's sugar.  Lays figured out how to make plain ole potato chips MORE addictive and market them as MORE healthy.

        Most candy bars are salty. Most chips are slightly sweet. Read the ingredients on ready-to heat and eat foods at the grocery store.

        Virtually all fast food and low/mid-level chains (Chilis, Applebees, Olive Garden, etc) highly process their food to create this blend.

        Why? because you crave it, so you come back. So you eat more, so you buy more.

        Highly palatable" foods -- those containing fat, sugar and salt -- stimulate the brain to release dopamine, the neurotransmitter associated with the pleasure center, he found. In time, the brain gets wired so that dopamine pathways light up at the mere suggestion of the food, such as driving past a fast-food restaurant, and the urge to eat the food grows insistent. Once the food is eaten, the brain releases opioids, which bring emotional relief. Together, dopamine and opioids create a pathway that can activate every time a person is reminded about the particular food. This happens regardless of whether the person is hungry.
        David A. Kessler, the Harvard-trained doctor, lawyer, medical school dean and former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration....

         is best remembered for his investigation of the tobacco industry and attempts to place it under federal regulation while he was FDA commissioner from 1990 to 1997. Although he was appointed by George H.W. Bush, Kessler became popular among Democrats for his tough regulatory stance.
        /snip

        After he was elected in 1992, President Bill Clinton asked Kessler to continue to run the FDA.

        /snip

        Kessler, 57,sees parallels between the tobacco and food industries. Both are manipulating consumer behavior to sell products that can harm health, he said.

        http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

        There should be hearings on Capitol Hill about this stuff. Obesity is killing Americans as fast as tobacco ever did.

        Of course, we need to stay the hell out of these restaurants on any sort of regular basis, and as you say, stop buying processed food (which IS junk food, even if it looks like a healthy lasagne dinner) especially for our kids.

        © grover


        So if you get hit by a bus tonight, would you be satisfied with how you spent today, your last day on earth? Live like tomorrow is never guaranteed, because it's not. -- Me.

        by grover on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 01:21:15 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I think the 16 oz limit is a bit too far (5+ / 0-)

      Is there any consumer that says "hmmm this 48 oz drink can't have any more sugar in than this 16 oz drink. I'll just take the 48 oz one". No. At this point we are telling consumers they are too stupid to make their own decisions so government will make those decisions for them. It is a caricature of what the right thinks Democrats stand for in public health.

      •  Yeah, but (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ahumbleopinion

        some people ARE too stupid to make some of these decisions. Should we punish all for the stupidity of the few? I'd rather see the soda tax take effect, and have it scale based on soda size so that the larger sized cups are still available, just at "treat" status instead of "everyday."

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site