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View Diary: An Unfortunate Truth About the Keystone XL Pipeline (22 comments)

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  •  Did you read the asterisk at the bottom of the (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Bob Love, Quicklund, sockpuppet, corvo

    page?

    *Not every ounce of refined oil is used to make gasoline. A very small percentage is used to create other products.
    •  That's not quite the same thing (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skohayes, sandbox, Egalitare, carver

      Crude oil is fractionally distilled (IIR the term correctly) which results in a spectrum of products from that one barrel of oil. (As O112358's link shows.) The non-gasoline portion of the spectrum taken together amounts to more than the gasoline portion, not just a "small percentage" of it.

      The 'small percentage' reference means some of the material that would ordinarily be turned into gasoline is instead turned into other specialty products.

    •  Actually, all the oil is used to make other produc (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Quicklund, carver

      products. A barrel is 42 gallons of crude. Of that, about 20 gallons becomes gasoline (there is a little variation in that #.)
      9-10 gallons becomes diesel, fuel oil, jet fuel. At the bottom of the vat you get asphalt, with various lubricants in between. With further refining you can turn some of the asphalt into more gasoline.
        Due to the fact that most refinery products have a lower specific gravity than crude, there is a "refinery gain," meaning that the volume of product is greater than the volume of crude and feedstock.
         Tar sands are a substance called bitumin. Tar sand oil is extra heavy crude and contains more asphalt compounds and paraffins than light crude.
         Exploiting the Canadian tar sands involves strip mining and various water intensive processes. The high CO2 emissions from tar sand use is due to the extraordinary amount of processing required to obatin a useful product.

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