Skip to main content

View Diary: “Catholic Church revving up its ‘beat-down the Democratic vote’ operations” WITH GOV'T FUNDS (96 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  Calling discrimination something else... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Magenta, VClib

    ...makes it no less discrimination. In this case, your proposal appears to be based not on any sound legal principle, but rather on your own animus toward religion.

    Not for having religious ties, but for being religions.
    Here's your first challenge: Provide an operative definition of how we could determine what organizations qualify as "religions."
    And "discriminating against religion" is hardly unconstitutional if one discriminates against all of them equally.
    Sure it is... it would, in effect, be an establishment of "no religion" as a state religion, in that nonreligious nonprofit interest or affinity organizations would enjoy a tax break while religious organizations (which are nonprofit interest or affinity organizations whose interest or affinity is religion) would not.
    Furthermore, denial of a privilege is not "discrimination."
    So you wouldn't think it was "discrimination" if a state decided that they were only going to issue drivers' licenses to men? After all, a drivers' license is a privilege, not a right, as the drivers' ed instructors remind us so often; denying women that privilege, by your own reckoning, would not be an act of "discrimination."

    "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

    by JamesGG on Tue Oct 02, 2012 at 02:11:17 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  Your last comparison is ludicrous; (0+ / 0-)

      if you can't obtain a driver license, you can't legally drive.  But you can operate a church even if you don't have a tax exemption.  

      As for the "establishment" of "no religion" as a state religion on the basis of not granting tax exemptions, well, that's funny.  As in chuckle-provoking.  Would nonbelievers be getting tax exemptions for being nonbelievers?

      •  Okay, let's try another example then. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        VClib
        if you can't obtain a driver license, you can't legally drive.
        Since you see a tax exemption as a "privilege" whose granting is inherently unable to be an act of discrimination, would you call it "discrimination" if the federal government decided tomorrow that all men would get a $2,000 tax credit, but no woman would get it? I know I sure would.
        Would nonbelievers be getting tax exemptions for being nonbelievers?
        Functionally, yes. Irreligious organizations would get tax exemptions for not talking about religion or professing any religious beliefs. Making religious discussion off-limits for nonprofit organizations that want to remain tax-exempt is, in effect, codifying discrimination against religion.

        "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

        by JamesGG on Wed Oct 03, 2012 at 05:58:16 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

  • Recommended (157)
  • Community (73)
  • Elections (44)
  • Environment (43)
  • Bernie Sanders (42)
  • 2016 (41)
  • Hillary Clinton (35)
  • Spam (34)
  • Culture (34)
  • Republicans (33)
  • Media (32)
  • Climate Change (32)
  • Civil Rights (28)
  • Labor (27)
  • Education (24)
  • Science (24)
  • Congress (24)
  • Law (23)
  • Barack Obama (22)
  • Trans-Pacific Partnership (22)
  • Click here for the mobile view of the site