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View Diary: Romney disavows 47 percent remark despite repeatedly defending it (151 comments)

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  •  Correction: "go borrow $10,000 from your parents" (2+ / 0-)
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    Jakkalbessie, Janet 707

    Romney probably sincerely wishes every member of the 47 percent would just go into entrepreneurship!

    BTW, serious correction about 'don't pay taxes'....It's INCOME TAX .....working poor still pay PAYROLL TAX and Lord knows how much we all pay in sales tax, etc. etc.

    I think we need to quote FDR's big picture to counteract Romney because facts don't matter .........Faith, emotions, viscera overwhelm the thinking part of the brain.

    Some thoughts......

    I especially value FDR's phrase about

    "Private enterprise, indeed, became too private. It became privileged enterprise, not free enterprise."
    http://en.wikiquote.org/...

    Speech to the Democratic National Convention (1936)
    Speech in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (27 June 1936)

    SNIPPETS:

    It was natural and perhaps human that the privileged princes of these new economic dynasties, thirsting for power, reached out for control over government itself. They created a new despotism and wrapped it in the robes of legal sanction. In its service new mercenaries sought to regiment the people, their labor, and their property. And as a result the average man once more confronts the problem that faced the Minute Man.
    The hours men and women worked, the wages they received, the conditions of their labor — these had passed beyond the control of the people, and were imposed by this new industrial dictatorship. The savings of the average family, the capital of the small-businessmen, the investments set aside for old age — other people's money — these were tools which the new economic royalty used to dig itself in. Those who tilled the soil no longer reaped the rewards which were their right. The small measure of their gains was decreed by men in distant cities. Throughout the nation, opportunity was limited by monopoly. Individual initiative was crushed in the cogs of a great machine. The field open for free business was more and more restricted. Private enterprise, indeed, became too private. It became privileged enterprise, not free enterprise.
    SNIP
    For too many of us the political equality we once had won was meaningless in the face of economic inequality. A small group had concentrated into their own hands an almost complete control over other people's property, other people's money, other people's labor — other people's lives. For too many of us life was no longer free; liberty no longer real; men could no longer follow the pursuit of happiness.
     Against economic tyranny such as this, the American citizen could appeal only to the organized power of government. The collapse of 1929 showed up the despotism for what it was. The election of 1932 was the people's mandate to end it. Under that mandate it is being ended.
    These economic royalists complain that we seek to overthrow the institutions of America. What they really complain of is that we seek to take away their power. Our allegiance to American institutions requires the overthrow of this kind of power. In vain they seek to hide behind the flag and the Constitution. In their blindness they forget what the flag and the Constitution stand for. Now, as always, they stand for democracy, not tyranny; for freedom, not subjection; and against a dictatorship by mob rule and the over-privileged alike.
    The brave and clear platform adopted by this convention, to which I heartily subscribe, sets forth that government in a modern civilization has certain inescapable obligations to its citizens, among which are protection of the family and the home, the establishment of a democracy of opportunity, and aid to those overtaken by disaster.
    Message to Congress on Tax Revision (19 June 1935)
    if a government is to be prudent its taxes must produce ample revenues without discouraging enterprise; and if it is to be just it must distribute the burden of taxes equitably. I do not believe that our present system of taxation completely meets this test. Our revenue laws have operated in many ways to the unfair advantage of the few, and they have done little to prevent an unjust concentration of wealth and economic power.

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