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View Diary: Education Alternatives: Credentials (29 comments)

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  •  I've been amazed at how much this changes from (7+ / 0-)

    state to state.

    In TX, nothing was needed.

    In Alabama, no credentials but we were supposed to register with a church school (what about separation between church and state, hey).

    In California, you just register as a private school.

    In Nevada, we filed a curriculum but no credential needed.

    In Washington DC, you have to have a high school diploma or proof of equivalent smarts. I guess someone could vouch for you if you couldn't find your diploma somewhere?

    •  In Oklahoma, (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      angelajean, Chi, FloridaSNMOM

      our state constitution gives us the right to homeschool.

      All knowledge is worth having. Check out OctopodiCon to support steampunk learning and fun. Also, on DKos, check out the Itzl Alert Network.

      by Noddy on Sun Oct 14, 2012 at 09:58:51 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

        •  No credentials needed (0+ / 0-)

          Section 4, Art. 13 was created specifically to allow homeschooling for at least 180 days a year. It does not require parents to use certified teachers, or use state-approved curricula. Students may not be tested by the state to verify education unless the parents seeks to place the child into public schools after homeschooling.  State and local officials may not inspect the home or visit to prove homeschooling.

          In Sheppard v. Oklahoma, 306 P.2d 346 (Okla. Crim. App. 1957), the court emphasized "it was incumbent on the state to offer proof" that "no other means of education was provided." The court indicated further that, if the state finds other means of education are being provided, then they must prove that the means of education is not "adequate and comparable" to instruction in public schools. Since the state provided no avenue for "adequate and comparable", there is no equivalency possible, which makes proving it difficult.  The best they can do is prove that "homeschooling" is used as an excuse for truancy, but if there's even the merest amount of homeschooling provided, that ends that claim.

          No teacher qualification of parents is required.  No standardized testing of homeschooled students is required.

          However, public schools can require that students attending public schools not be homeschooled.  It's not a state decree, but an individual school district issue - students attending pubic school may not be homeschooled during public school hours and students may not miss public school for homeschooling opportunities. Some school districts allow it, some don't.  Most will count homeschooling field trip absences as unexcused and suspend or expel the student - some wait until the maximum number of unexcused absences and some will do so as soon as they suspect the student is being homeschooled.  It used to be much stricter than it is now, but it goes in waves.  Homeschooling has a higher degree of acceptance right now.

          All knowledge is worth having. Check out OctopodiCon to support steampunk learning and fun. Also, on DKos, check out the Itzl Alert Network.

          by Noddy on Sun Oct 14, 2012 at 07:08:56 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

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