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View Diary: Backyard Science: Arthropod Diversity Part Three, Orthoptera (58 comments)

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  •  Just found this and I'm leaving in about five (10+ / 0-)

    minutes so no time to read it just now. Will definitely pull it back up and read it completely when I get back later today. Already tipped and rec'd since I know you would never put out a diary not worthy of it. Looks great and can't wait to read it. Thanks for taking the time to do this.

    Just give me some truth. John Lennon--- OWS------Too Big To Fail

    by burnt out on Thu Nov 15, 2012 at 09:59:21 AM PST

    •  I am actually quite proud of this diary (9+ / 0-)

      Diaries on the larger orders, by necessity, will be less detailed.  There is no way I can discuss every family of beetle or wasp.  I would never finish and even if I could, no one would ever read it all.

      This is a group with relatively few families and one I know pretty well so I could go wild.

      I hope you enjoy it.

      "We are normal and we want our freedom" - Bonzos

      by matching mole on Thu Nov 15, 2012 at 10:09:22 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Great job mm. Gonna hang on to this one for sure. (2+ / 0-)

        I got so inspired by it I went and ID'd a couple of Opthoptera that I hadn't gotten further than their generic names, of cricket and katydid. Took the cricket all the way down to species, Gryllus veletis , but only got the katydid to genus, Scuddeeria. Pics that I have aren't good enough to take it further.

        Thanks for doing this series, it's great.

        Just give me some truth. John Lennon--- OWS------Too Big To Fail

        by burnt out on Thu Nov 15, 2012 at 07:40:29 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  What time of year did you find the cricket? (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          burnt out

          Gryllus veletis has a look-alike 'cousin' Gryllus pennsylvanicus.  Their life cycles are out of synch so adults are never present at the same time.  Adult veletis are out in the spring and pennsylvanicus in the late summer and early autumn.

          IDing things all the way down to species can be tough.  In some cases you can only do it for one sex, usually the males.

          Glad you liked the diary

          "We are normal and we want our freedom" - Bonzos

          by matching mole on Fri Nov 16, 2012 at 04:36:37 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I found it in September but went with veletis (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            matching mole

            anyway because bug guide had no listing of penns. in Missouri. But I realize that doesn't rule out the possibility that there are none here,(probably are in fact) so I guess I should have settled with genus for that one too, shoot.

            Just give me some truth. John Lennon--- OWS------Too Big To Fail

            by burnt out on Fri Nov 16, 2012 at 05:52:28 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Distribution from Singing Insects of (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              burnt out

              North America

              http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/...

              shows quite a few records from Missouri and a probable range throughout the state for pennsylvanicus.  I think Bugguide has rather spotty distribution and shouldn't be regarded as comprehensive for range information.

              You might also want to look at Gryllus rubens which is a southeastern species with a record in Missouri and Gryllus vernalis which has a couple of records.

              For crickets and katydids, Singing Insects is really an outstanding resource.

              "We are normal and we want our freedom" - Bonzos

              by matching mole on Fri Nov 16, 2012 at 11:21:22 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

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