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View Diary: Indiana GOP Sen Candidate Mourdock: G-d Intended Rape Pregnancies to Happen (300 comments)

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  •  If god is all knowing and all poweful (8+ / 0-)

    isn't that the only logical conclusion?

    You can't invoke free will, because god knows exactly what choice you're going to make before creation, and he engineered people to make those choices anyway. God is more powerful than Satan, and created Satan as well in any case, so the existence of Satan cannot absolve god of his responsibilities. Free will is also not a defense - god could always stop situations from occurring without defying free will - for instance he could decide that Hitler gets killed in WWII (like millions of others) and Nazi Germany never happens. But god doesn't.

    I don't believe in god, so I don't have to worry about it.

    But it's not crazy, if you believe that god intervenes in human affairs to help you find your keys or help your sports team win on Sunday, that could intervene and stop rapes if he wanted to.

    I think the answer is less religion in the public sphere, not "the right religion" in the public sphere.

    When we stop putting leaders from the past up on pedestals and ignoring their flaws, we can start seeing our present leaders for what they really are.

    by PhillyJeff on Tue Oct 23, 2012 at 06:12:41 PM PDT

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    •  Just a quick note: (5+ / 0-)

      I'm not saying that all or even most religious people believe this.

      However, I do think that it is logically consistent if you have a fundamentalist worldview.

      This is one of the reasons IMO we can't (at least privately) say that religious beliefs are all great and private and they shouldn't be an issue in elections etc.

      Believing certain religious tenants really does make an impact on your ability to govern.

      When we stop putting leaders from the past up on pedestals and ignoring their flaws, we can start seeing our present leaders for what they really are.

      by PhillyJeff on Tue Oct 23, 2012 at 06:15:09 PM PDT

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      •  the crazy fundie part of this (0+ / 0-)

        is the "ergo, we should do nothing" part. Like I've said above, if you follow this twisted logic to its extreme essentially all forms of helping anyone is sinful and bad, and suddenly you're completely ignoring a lot of stuff Jesus said.

        Good Samaritan? Should've left that victim to die in the street obviously. I guess the Priest that ignored his plight and walked past him had the right idea.

        "I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, a stranger and you welcomed me"? sorry, can't possibly interfere with God making you hungry and thirsty.

        "See? I'm not a racist! I have a black friend!"

        by TheHalfrican on Wed Oct 24, 2012 at 12:10:38 AM PDT

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    •  But gee, (11+ / 0-)

      if God already knows that a woman will have an abortion (which an all-knowing God will know), making her pregnant can't really intend that the baby be born, because God knows there's going to be an abortion.

      Really, their position makes sense only if you believe that God always wants more children to be born.  Which is demonstrably false, due to the high incidence of early miscarriages.  

      (Miscarriages occur in about 15–20% of pregnancies. Most occur in the first 13 weeks of pregnancy. Some miscarriages take place before a woman misses a menstrual period or is even aware that she is pregnant.)  

      •  I just said basically the same below (9+ / 0-)

        The god's will theory of life has always been too flimsy to stand up to any logical argument. Essentially you'd believe that god wills people to be born that he knows will do heinous things and end up suffering for eternity in a hell that he created. Sounds kind of sadistic to me actually.

        48forEastAfrica - Donate to Oxfam "Compassion is the radicalism of our time." ~ Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama -7.88, -6.21

        by Siri on Tue Oct 23, 2012 at 06:45:48 PM PDT

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      •  I don't have to follow the logic - I don't believe (0+ / 0-)

        I'm pointing out that we celebrate the "religious faith" of our candidates, and we don't even bother to investigate what the implications of that religious faith might be. We're not allowed to talk about it - they can say "it's my faith" and we're supposed to shut up.

        Then when someone actually believes what the book says we're supposed to believe "he's not a real christian" and he just made that stuff up out of nowhere. That's my only point.

        When we stop putting leaders from the past up on pedestals and ignoring their flaws, we can start seeing our present leaders for what they really are.

        by PhillyJeff on Tue Oct 23, 2012 at 08:00:10 PM PDT

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    •  I saw somewhere recently... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DSPS owl

      If the right wants religion in politics (and governing), churches should be taxed.

      "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil, is for good men to do nothing."

      by Philly526 on Tue Oct 23, 2012 at 08:43:33 PM PDT

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      •  Yep, the diary was... (0+ / 0-)

        from 6/17/2012 and covered a study that estimated the lost revenue from church tax exemptions. The diary was here. And I made similar arguments to what you are saying in the thread here and here. Really, the two comments I made could easily be turned into it's own separate diary, and I considered it, but never had the time and the moment passed...haha.

        Blogs: http://mediadeconstruction.com/ Twitter: realsteveholt

        by steveholt on Wed Oct 24, 2012 at 08:02:27 AM PDT

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