Skip to main content

View Diary: Puppy mill dogs to be shot by Amish in Ohio (130 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  are you talking about the puppymillers here? (5+ / 0-)

    Or Amish in general?

    What exactly are Amish folks supposed to do with horses that are too old to work?

    Keep them as pets?

    Do you think that farmers keep most old cows and hogs around when they have reached the end of their productive life?

    •  Can't speak for "most farmers," (3+ / 0-)

      But, yes, our old work horse laid down and died nice and peaceful of old age in our beautiful pasture.

      And we definitely treated her like a pet. Us little kids used take her fresh carrots every day, and pet her for awhile.

      WE NEVER FORGET Our Labor Martyrs: a project to honor the men, women and children who lost their lives in Freedom's Cause. For Nov: Voting Rights Martyrs

      by JayRaye on Tue Nov 13, 2012 at 05:13:10 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I have no problem with keeping an old animal. (0+ / 0-)

        I don't know of any who haven't kept a favorite workhorse, dairy cow, or sow past their prime for sentimental reasons.

        But hay is not cheap.  Particularly in a drought year like this.

        To expect Amish folks, many of whom are very thrifty by nature out of economic necessity, to run retirement homes for old horse strikes me as strange.

        I have no problem with a horse being sent to slaughter if it was cared for during its productive life.

        •  actually our hay was free (0+ / 0-)

          only labor involved

          sending a horse to slaughter is like sending a dog to slaughter in my book

          horses bond just like dogs

          WE NEVER FORGET Our Labor Martyrs: a project to honor the men, women and children who lost their lives in Freedom's Cause. For Nov: Voting Rights Martyrs

          by JayRaye on Tue Nov 13, 2012 at 10:09:18 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  PS. every farmer I've ever know is thrifty (0+ / 0-)

            my grandfather built our barn with his own hands, also the outhouse, the chicken coop, and the work shed

            not asking anyone to run a "retirement home for horses" that sarcasm was unnecessary.

            But the horse that has served a family all of their lives, deserves a good retirement. Horses give a lot of love and deserve love in return.

            Our horse was a big work horse, but us kids did sometimes ride her, and with only a bridle. I fell off once and got the wind knocked out of me. She stopped and nuzzled me, then when I was able to stand up, she walked me back to the barn nudging my shoulder all the way. I was maybe 7 at the time, so had no authority over her & was not leading her with any reins either. She did this out of love.

            No one should be sending an animal like that to slaughter.

            WE NEVER FORGET Our Labor Martyrs: a project to honor the men, women and children who lost their lives in Freedom's Cause. For Nov: Voting Rights Martyrs

            by JayRaye on Tue Nov 13, 2012 at 10:40:24 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  That really wasn't sarcasm. (0+ / 0-)

              You seem to be judging others for not sharing the same type of affection you have for an animal.

              I'm not denying that people can develop special bonds with draft animals.  But I'm not going to judge those that don't as long as their horses are well cared for.

              I've also seen non-Amish folks sink an incredible amount of money into veterinary care for horses that it would be more humane to euthanize.

              Horses eat a lot of hay. I don't think many of my neighbors could really afford to be sentimental and feed a lame or old horse hay when that could be going to a cow that generates some income.

              There was a very interesting piece on the radio last week about a college in Vermont that has chosen to slaughter a pair of oxen that have been used on the college farm and are sort of icons of the program.  It was very interesting.

          •  Hay is never free. (0+ / 0-)

            Hay is grown on land that could be producing something else - which means there is an opportunity cost.

            Making hay requires twine, wear and tear on farm machinery, and fuel (whether oats for horses or diesel for the tractor).

            And most farmers need to get a return on their labor.

            I'm not criticizing someone choosing to keep an animal for sentimental reasons - but it is important to note that it is still an economic choice.

            •  Haystacks do not require twine. (0+ / 0-)

              Ours was a back woods farm and produced almost everything we needed.

              I'll admit, we were lucky that way, altho most people don't see being without electricity or indoor plumbing as being lucky.

              It would never cross our minds not to keep our old horse. We didn't see it as a sentimental choice, but as a duty. One we were willing to sacrifice for.

              That's where we differ.

              WE NEVER FORGET Our Labor Martyrs: a project to honor the men, women and children who lost their lives in Freedom's Cause. For Nov: Voting Rights Martyrs

              by JayRaye on Tue Nov 13, 2012 at 01:57:21 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

  • Recommended (156)
  • Community (71)
  • Elections (44)
  • Environment (42)
  • Bernie Sanders (42)
  • 2016 (40)
  • Hillary Clinton (35)
  • Spam (34)
  • Culture (33)
  • Republicans (31)
  • Climate Change (31)
  • Media (31)
  • Civil Rights (27)
  • Labor (27)
  • Congress (24)
  • Science (24)
  • Education (24)
  • Law (23)
  • Barack Obama (22)
  • Trans-Pacific Partnership (22)
  • Click here for the mobile view of the site