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View Diary: Ragequitting Your Country is Easier Said Than Done (12 comments)

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  •  As One Who Started to Emigrate From US, (4+ / 0-)

    snagged by family obligations, most Americans probably can't get into any country they'd want to live in.

    Other countries invest in their citizens with policies such as national health, labor rights, cheap or free education and so on. They protect that investment against being harmed by waves of immigrants coming in.

    For Canada where we were applying, you had to have a job waiting for you that a Canadian couldn't fill. THat's a very high hurdle. And they don't take self-employers either, as I understood the requirement, unless it's in some type of activity relating to Canadian cultural heritage.

    If you're bringing in a business that will hire Canadians, they're more interested, but that's not most Americans.

    You also have to pass FBI background check, and you must never have had a DUI.

    You'll also have to demonstrate some fluency in --gasp!-- French.

    I forget whether you need to know Canadian history. I can imagine wingers choking on the part about Canada winning the War of 1812.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Wed Nov 14, 2012 at 10:45:00 AM PST

    •  Canada's "regular immigration" rules are (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      True North, PSzymeczek

      quite strict. Most people who emigrate there, do so on the basis of family already residing in Canada, or as refugees from the more miserable parts of the world, as the criteria are relaxed considerably in those cases.

      Visit Lacking All Conviction, your patch of grey on those too-sunny days.

      by eataTREE on Wed Nov 14, 2012 at 11:06:35 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Ways other than "regular immigration" (0+ / 0-)

        Canada's regular immigration rules can be quite strict, though if you happen to be an American neurosurgeon your odds are pretty good.

        But over the years Canada has looked for ways to facilitate entry of people whose skills are needed.

        One of the methods for doing that is that all the provinces except Quebec—which runs its own immigration program—have provincial nominee programs. Provincial governments make the decisions about which immigrants they are keen to attract. The skills in high demand in one province may be in lower demand elsewhere.

        The provincial nominee program determines whether a particular aspiring migrant is someone it wants, and, if so, the program asks the federal government to accept that person.

        All the standard rules for medical and security screening apply, but not the screening for the person's skills or job prospects. By putting this person's name forward, the provincial program has covered the question of whether he or she is needed or not.

        If accepted by first the PNP and then by Canada Immigration, the person enters as a landed immigrant—not as a temporary foreign worker.

        There is an important catch: someone who wants to apply by way of a provincial nominee program has to start there. Someone who has already applied to CIC cannot switch to the provincial system. (At least that's the way it was the last time i checked.)

        As noted, Quebec runs its own immigration program. Applicants fluent in French often find it far easier to be accepted by Quebec. Applicants who have young children are especially appreciated—the more the better.

        I've heard it said that it is a lot easier for a francophone Moroccan secretary to be accepted by Quebec than for an English-speaking secretary from just about anywhere to be accepted by the federal government.

    •  Shhh. (0+ / 0-)
      Other countries invest in their citizens with policies such as national health, labor rights, cheap or free education and so on. They protect that investment against being harmed by waves of immigrants coming in.
      We wouldn't want any Americans getting such crazy ideas.

      "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity, and I am not sure about the universe." -- Albert Einstein

      by Neuroptimalian on Wed Nov 14, 2012 at 04:21:29 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

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