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View Diary: Who gave employers these rights? (37 comments)

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  •  People who don't like working for others (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    VClib

    are free to start their own businesses and work on their own terms. I know a woman who will travel to your home to give manicures and pedicures.  Or a plumber operating as a sole proprietor.  Or a man who cut lawns and did gardens for a living -- he cut the lawn and did the garden at my parents' (who were pretty solidly middle class) home for years..  Or someone who will come to your house and detail your car. Or any other service that people are willing to pay for.   Nothing says you have to be someone else's employee.  

    If you don't want to work for someone else, the solution is simple.  Get a skill that people will pay for, and start your own business.  

    •  I don't think the issue was being told what to do (1+ / 0-)
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      tikkun

      at work. It is the increasing tendency of employers to tell you whom to vote for, what to post on social networking sites, and so on.

      Where are all the jobs, Boehner?

      by Dirtandiron on Wed Nov 21, 2012 at 04:19:57 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Again, if someone doesn't like that (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        VClib

        they have choices:  (1) find another employer; (2) work for themselves where they have no "employer"; or (3) make themselves so valuable, or in demand, that they can have more bargaining leverage in negotiating their terms of employment.  

        When we hire someone with a very specialized, in-demand skill, we are far more likely to make the concessions a candidate wants than when we hire a for a position that is easy to fill.  If a position is easy to fill, and candidate A doesn't like the terms we are offering or the working conditions, we say "thank you for your time" and move on to the next candidate.  

        No one OWES somebody a job on terms the employee wants.   An employer makes a job offer on terms that (assuming they comply with the laws) the EMPLOYER wants.   The prospective employee can either accept those terms, seek another job, or -- if the employee has some particular skill, experience, or credential that gives the employee leverage in the job negotiation -- attempt to negotiate a better deal.  

        Nobody forces an employee to work in a job if they don't like employer.

        •  Why should an employer be able to tell me who to (1+ / 0-)
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          mamamorgaine

          vote for? Why do they need to read my private Facebook messages? I think people have a reasonable expectation to keep their personal life private. And to be allowed to have their own beliefs. If you are not free to vote for the candidate of your choice, you are not free, period.

          Where are all the jobs, Boehner?

          by Dirtandiron on Wed Nov 21, 2012 at 05:29:09 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I think that it depends. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            VClib

            I would never ask an employee, or a potential employee, for a password.  However I would, and have, let someone go at least in part for things that person posted on Facebook -- and we didn't need any passwords to see the postings.  (Facebook is not private -- it is like telling 200 people, or however many friends you have, something and then retaining some ridiculous notion that they won't tell anyone else.)  

            Let me give you an example.  Suppose you work for a company that provides services to other businesses, and you go on Facebook, or some other internet location (on your own time), and trash the clients of your company.  Or suppose you go to big parties and routinely trash the clients of your company. Of COURSE you would -- and should - be let go for that.  So, yes, sometimes what  employees do on their own time IS the employer's business.

            And nobody has the right to MAKE you vote for anyone.  That's illegal.  But an employer is completely free to tell you his/her politics, and to tell you what he/she thinks that certain policies will do to the business. (There's SCOTUS precedent for that.)  If you don't want to listen to what the person paying you money is saying, that's fine -- politely explain that you'd prefer not to hear, and if they continue to tell you and it's that important to you, quit. Go find another job, or work for yourself.  

            Nobody OWES someone else a job on the employee's terms.  Again, the only thing that, as an employee, someone is entitled to is that the employer (1) comply with the law; and (2) comply with whatever agreement was made when the job was offered and accepted.  An employee has no "right" to dictate the conditions of the employment beyond that; if an employee doesn't like what his employer says or does, the employee's option is to quit. (If you are easily replaced, the employer won't care; if you are not easily replaced, the employer WILL care and is far more likely to change so that you'll stay.)  

            Nobody can force an employee to work for someone he/she doesn't want to.  But no one can force an employer to keep an employee he/she doesn't want to (with the sole exception of the reasons protected by the civil rights laws).  

        •  That attitude is the reason (3+ / 0-)
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          mamamorgaine, Dirtandiron, Uncle Moji

          we need unions.  One person who is abused by his boss hasn't the clout or the money to hire the necessary lawyers to deal with the company.  Collectively workers do have the clout to protect themselves.

          Newt 2012. Sociopath, adulterer, hypocrite, Republican.

          by tikkun on Wed Nov 21, 2012 at 09:04:32 PM PST

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